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Thread: Surly cogs

  1. #1
    Neg reppers r my biatches
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    Surly cogs

    Any reason not to think the new Surly cogs are a killer deal? Seems to make a lot of sense over the higher prices alternatives.

  2. #2
    Neg reppers r my biatches
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    thanks for that! i will order a few as you suggest. now all i need to do is figure out what sizes as this will be for a 29er and i want to keep the gearing relative to what i have now.

    cheers

  3. #3
    HIKE!
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    solid value indeed

    I'd say the Surly cogs are a good deal. All sizes from 13-22 in one tooth increments allows for gear options galore (as things come and go in QBPs stock), useable on older cassette hubs, new bling bling alloy freehub bodies, and the current crop of SS cassette hub and BMX cassette hubs. Seem solid and long wearing. No flex, as I've witnessed a riding partner consistently throw his chain off a pricey Boone Ti cog, a swap to a Surly and no more chain drop (all chainline and tension issues addressed, the Surly cog cured it)

    I've personally loaded up on stainless Surly rings in the tooth and bolt patterns I llike, and a handful of Surly SS cogs as a hedge against scarcity years down the road. An all stainless steel Surly ring and cog combo is a winner. Use them, you will not be disappointed.

  4. #4
    drev-il, not Dr. Evil!
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    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    Any reason not to think the new Surly cogs are a killer deal? Seems to make a lot of sense over the higher prices alternatives.
    No, but like most things Surly, they are heavy. They seem indestructable and should last a long time. Another nice thing about them is that they aren't centered over the base, so you can flip 'em to adjust your chainline.
    "Keep your burgers lean and your tires fat." -h.d. | bikecentric | ssoft

  5. #5
    HIKE!
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    neat things possible:

    do a 'google' search for Sheldon Brown's Gear Calculator at Harris Cyclery, you can figure out lots of neat things (MPH at a given RPM, Gain Ratio, Gear inches) of any given wheel size, crank length, and gear combination. Fun and informative.

    I'm going to set up a bike with a 4 tooth difference front and rear (like a White Industries system that uses a 3 tooth diff)..... for example:

    34, 38 front rings, and a 18,22 cogs in the back. 34x22 for steep rugged riding, and the 38x18 for flatter rides, getting to the trailhead. Same chain length, and chainlines should be just right in either combo. Or some other gearing depending on the situation.....

    Good possibilities abound. Now I suppose no "shifting" during a ride, or it is not a SS anymore, eh?

  6. #6
    Neg reppers r my biatches
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    thanks. how much weight are we talking about? While percentage wise I am sure they are relatively heavy to others but in absolute terms I can't imagine the weight added is much....please advise if you do you know as you have me curious.

    cheers

  7. #7
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    thanks. how much weight are we talking about? While percentage wise I am sure they are relatively heavy to others but in absolute terms I can't imagine the weight added is much....please advise if you do you know as you have me curious.

    cheers
    Dunno the exact weight, but my 22T is noticeably bulky, enough for me to say "eeesh!" I bought the Surly because it was available to me that day, but I think the Boone is worth the extra $20 for both decreased weight and aesthetics.

  8. #8
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    I have 14, 18 and 22T Surlys on the way. Would have liked a 25 or 26T.

    Good price and they should outlast the Ti and aluminum cogs. I am not worried about the weight.
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  9. #9
    but Diggin the 1 x 14 too
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    Caution;  Merge;  Workers Ahead! spare cogs...

    [SIZE=2]...if anyone needs... i have 2 Brand new spare cogs, a SURLY 21t STEEL and an ENDLESS 22t ALUMINUM cog... both BRAND new, PM me![/SIZE]

  10. #10
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    Built to last

    Surly cogs are nice and thick with long teeth. The King cog teeth are shorter and not as thick. IMO the Surly and the Endless are a little smoother than the King. I know that I won't be wearing one out anytime soon. That said, my 18t Endless cog hardly shows any wear after half a season of riding. It's hard to wear stuff out at 140 lbs;P
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  11. #11
    dirty hippy mountainbiker
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    alloy

    I'm worried about using one on my laserdisc light hubs. Are we sure they're ok for super soft alloy hubs?

    Shiggy: what DOES worry you?

    -M
    Mike Henderson, Dirty Hippy Mountain Biker and part owner of Jet Lites.

  12. #12
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfy
    I'm worried about using one on my laserdisc light hubs. Are we sure they're ok for super soft alloy hubs?

    Shiggy: what DOES worry you?

    -M
    The Surly cogs have a wide base for use on aluminum and Ti cassette bodies.

    DIY tubeless worries me. Not much else.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drevil
    ...Another nice thing about them is that they aren't centered over the base, so you can flip 'em to adjust your chainline.
    They aren't centered on the base because its cheaper to make them that way!
    -Marshall Hance
    EndlessBikeCo.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sideways
    They aren't centered on the base because its cheaper to make them that way!
    ...how about both

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by speedoxc
    ...how about both
    Using a flip flop cog to adjust chainline doesn't make much sence in the face of 1mm spacers existing. Once the chainline is dialed in, its nice to simply flip the cog to get extended life instead of having to reconfigure the chainline with spacers simply to account for an off center cog.
    -Marshall Hance
    EndlessBikeCo.

  16. #16
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    [QUOTE=Sideways]Using a flip flop cog to adjust chainline doesn't make much sence in the face of 1mm spacers existing. Once the chainline is dialed in, its nice to simply flip the cog to get extended life instead of having to reconfigure the chainline with spacers simply to account for an off center cog.[/QUOTE

    I agree with you, and like I said "both". Perhaps if one doesn't want to fiddle with chainline when flipping a cog they should buy a kick ass cog...

  17. #17
    drev-il, not Dr. Evil!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sideways
    Using a flip flop cog to adjust chainline doesn't make much sence in the face of 1mm spacers existing.
    Cool. Who makes a 1mm spacer, especially one that won't buckle when it's side-loaded? Thanks.
    "Keep your burgers lean and your tires fat." -h.d. | bikecentric | ssoft

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drevil
    Cool. Who makes a 1mm spacer, especially one that won't buckle when it's side-loaded? Thanks.
    I've seen some mangled stamped spacers from the wheels manufacturing brand, which I carried prior to producing USA made machined spacers. Regretfully I don't know of a brand other than my own that makes a quality spacer in smaller sizes.
    -Marshall Hance
    EndlessBikeCo.

  19. #19
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sideways
    I've seen some mangled stamped spacers from the wheels manufacturing brand, which I carried prior to producing USA made machined spacers. Regretfully I don't know of a brand other than my own that makes a quality spacer in smaller sizes.
    Out of curiosity, why does it cost less to make an asymmetrical cog?

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    Out of curiosity, why does it cost less to make an asymmetrical cog?
    Machine time=$
    When there are fewer step in the process not fliping the part, finding the depth, and runing a program, the part costs less money.
    -Marshall Hance
    EndlessBikeCo.

  21. #21
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sideways
    Machine time=$
    When there are fewer step in the process not fliping the part, finding the depth, and runing a program, the part costs less money.
    I'm not familiar with the manufacturing process. Is the flat side of the Surly cog one surface of a sheet of metal, and the shaped side the surface that has been machined down from original thickness?

  22. #22
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    $$$

    what do these new Surly cogs reatil for????

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by disco
    what do these new Surly cogs reatil for????
    $30 for 17t+, $24 for the smaller ones.
    [SIZE=1]"The mouth of justice contemplates wisdom."[/SIZE]

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