Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    132

    Steel V.S. Aluminium frame for SS??

    Hi,

    I am very much interested in turning my old Steel Chrom double butted KHS (Crest) into a SS . Commuting and eventually trail riding. I was wandering though – Material wise, if the Steel is not to flex for SS?
    Must I Look for a stiffer aluminium frame? Or maybe there Are advantages I'm missing out on this classic and xc frame design… I know there are Steel SS intended frames out there, but aren't those Extra Strong to prevent flex?( unlike my sweet KHS frame)

    Any Info and Advise Are Absolutely Welcome.

    Thanks,

    E.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    The magnitude is in the Details...

  2. #2
    glyphic bacon
    Reputation: Ziggy-Stardust's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    305
    Steel gives a better ride and is somewhat more compliant, dampening trail chatter. It won't cause any problems with rigidity or stiffness for SS-ing, some of the very best SS rides are steel (and people pay premium prices for custom steel frames too). If you have a nice steel frame that you like, then by all means go for it and convert it for SS. Alumimum frames tend to be a bit lighter plus they are inexpensive...but they usually give a somewhat harsher ride.

    Bottom line: convert and ride what ya got, steel is real man!

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    220

    ss frame

    Keep It Steel!!!

  4. #4
    still lurking
    Reputation: Sp*rky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    73
    Quote Originally Posted by RARES
    I was wandering though � Material wise, if the Steel is not to flex for SS?
    Must I Look for a stiffer aluminium frame?
    I've never heard of anyone looking for a stiffer ride on any type of bike. I've heard of people going with a stiffer frame because it was a lighter material, or the price, or some other feature, but never a stiffer frame just for the sake of being stif. I'm just curious about where you're reasoning comes from. I've never heard that before. But then again I'm not all that cutting edge.
    [SIZE=2]We all have monsters. But mine are scarier than yours. - MNS interpretation[/SIZE]

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Sideways's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    173
    Stiff is good.
    Compliant is good.
    Steel is good.
    Aluminum is also good.
    -Marshall Hance
    EndlessBikeCo.

  6. #6
    brother on a mission
    Reputation: Greenfix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    553
    Go for it.

    I too have a KHS, but it was purpose built as a single speed. Just build it up and see what you think. Here is a publicity photo from the khs site. I think theymay sell the frame alone, or there is one for sale in the classifieds here

  7. #7
    get down!
    Reputation: cjh_mtb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    325
    Quote Originally Posted by Sp*rky
    I've never heard of anyone looking for a stiffer ride on any type of bike. I've heard of people going with a stiffer frame because it was a lighter material, or the price, or some other feature, but never a stiffer frame just for the sake of being stif. I'm just curious about where you're reasoning comes from. I've never heard that before. But then again I'm not all that cutting edge.
    it works like a car (im sure not as effective, though). the stiffer the frame, the less bending and warping under higher pressures... this leads to more predictable handling and performance, and a tighter turning feel (especially on lean-in).

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SoloWithOthers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    216
    Quote Originally Posted by cjh_mtb
    it works like a car (im sure not as effective, though). the stiffer the frame, the less bending and warping under higher pressures... this leads to more predictable handling and performance, and a tighter turning feel (especially on lean-in).
    So... how do skis work?

    My steel frame is compliant... and predictable. And we can get along all day. Aluminum just passes too much shock to my body.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    132

    The reasoning:

    Quote Originally Posted by Sp*rky
    I've never heard of anyone looking for a stiffer ride on any type of bike. I've heard of people going with a stiffer frame because it was a lighter material, or the price, or some other feature, but never a stiffer frame just for the sake of being stif. I'm just curious about where you're reasoning comes from. I've never heard that before. But then again I'm not all that cutting edge.
    This is my reasoning:

    The stiff quality of a frame is welcome attribute in means of "less energy lost when pedalling". That is - energy lost into bending and flexing the frame rather than where we want it.

    But – its only reasoning ya know

    E.
    The magnitude is in the Details...

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    132
    Quote Originally Posted by cjh_mtb
    it works like a car (im sure not as effective, though). the stiffer the frame, the less bending and warping under higher pressures... this leads to more predictable handling and performance, and a tighter turning feel (especially on lean-in).
    Intresting - i'v thought of only in "wasted energy" terms but it seems you got better terms - Thanks!!
    E.
    The magnitude is in the Details...

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    842

    Just go ahead and do it

    and have fun riding. It's all good.

    Quit worrying about the flex/stiff

  12. #12
    still lurking
    Reputation: Sp*rky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    73
    Quote Originally Posted by RARES
    This is my reasoning:

    The stiff quality of a frame is welcome attribute in means of "less energy lost when pedalling". That is - energy lost into bending and flexing the frame rather than where we want it.

    But � its only reasoning ya know

    E.
    Ah! That makes sense.
    [SIZE=2]We all have monsters. But mine are scarier than yours. - MNS interpretation[/SIZE]

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SoloWithOthers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    216
    This is the same reasoning I ride a rigid fork. ;-)

  14. #14
    dirty hippy mountainbiker
    Reputation: wolfy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    1,150
    Seems to me like most of the energy loss due to flex in a mountain bicycle is in the tires/wheels. My steelie feels like aluminum with 60 psi, my alu feels like a steelie with 35 psi...

    But on SS you sure do put WAY more torque on the bars... Maybe that's where you lose some energy.

    -M
    Mike Henderson, Dirty Hippy Mountain Biker and part owner of Jet Lites.

  15. #15
    Des(s)ert Rat
    Reputation: screampint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    4,978
    I love my steel ss. I rode an AL HT for a year and a half, hated the ride, even though it was top of the line, I went back to steel. The only AL bike (out of 7 or 8) I have is my FS that is ridden by my son; and in an fs AL makes sense, no extra flex in the suspension is a good thing.

    However, when a frame is small enough to fit me, it will be inherently stiff. Shorter tubes flex less, offering a stiffer ride. Short AL tubes are just harsh.

Similar Threads

  1. What did my 88 Fat Chance sell for new?
    By mojo in forum Vintage, Retro, Classic
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-20-2005, 02:26 PM
  2. Steel is Real, What exactly does that mean?
    By Boise_pedaler in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 60
    Last Post: 04-04-2005, 05:50 AM
  3. comparison of ProPedal, Float and ALPS on same frame
    By ccm in forum Shocks and Suspension
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-15-2004, 08:37 AM
  4. So whats the BIG difference b/w Steel and Aluminum frames?!
    By Carlosantana in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 04-22-2004, 02:50 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •