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  1. #1
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    stamped vs. machined cog, and why

    so obviously the stamped cogs are alot cheaper, and the machined cogs look pretty. but do i REALLY need to drop the money? i kinda want to buy a couple to experiment with sizes but why spend $100 if i don't have to? talk me out of going with a pyramid/cyclepro cog and give answers that appeal to functionality not bling ss snobbery. thanks guys.
    no chain no gain.

  2. #2
    I have red hair
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    I bought a surly cog (actually I bought four) and never looked back. Top notch, wide, and will last forever, and they're affordable. You'll be happy you bought one

  3. #3
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    Not sure about all the excitement for designer cogs. I use a cheapie (bmx?) stamped steel cog on my SS. Replaced it after 6 years only because I was replacing the chainring and it seemed like the nice thing to do.

  4. #4
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    I bought stamped cogs because I was able to get a bunch of different sizes dirt cheap when I was just starting SS

    I still use those stamped cogs because they are steel and don't wear out, and because my hub shell is steel and hasn't notched

  5. #5
    I always bleed like this.
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    People like variety.
    A lot of hub shells are AL so the thinner stamped Cogs damage them.

    They work just as good as any other cog and do last a good long time but I am not going to put one on the Hadley that I ordered.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoorBehavior
    A lot of hub shells are AL so the thinner stamped Cogs damage them.
    This is the reasoning behind going with a machined cog. They are usually thicker, so they are less likely to gouge or otherwise damage your hub. If you're sure you have a steel freehub body, then go ahead and use the stamped ones, but if your freehub is aluminum I would recommend a cog with a wider base. Not sure what size? Get a few cheap stamped ones and when you decide what size is for you, then buy a good one (I like the surly's for the money, they are nice and wide and have big burly teeth).
    NEMBA Freetown VP

  7. #7
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    At $4 each I've been buying the stamped ones until I find the right ratio for me and the trails I ride. I don't like compromise so I've got 3 bikes to ensure the right gearing/handling for the different trails we've got around here. Once I'm confident I've got the right ratio then I'll order some nice surly cogs to prevent the wear on my freewheel. When I go to ride unfamiliar trails I'll likely carry the stack of stamped cogs along for the ride in case my normal gearing doesn't work out.

  8. #8
    I always bleed like this.
    Reputation: PoorBehavior's Avatar
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    At niagra cycles they have a redline AL cog for $8 . I picked up a couple just to wear out until I decide what size Boone I want to live with.

  9. #9
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    Like others have said, the main reason behind a machined cog is for the wide base spline so they will work on an aluminium freehub body.

    Shimano heat treated chromed stamped cogs are probably the longest lasting cogs I've ever used, and they are cheap. But they damage aluminium freehub bodies.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arkmage
    At $4 each I've been buying the stamped ones until I find the right ratio for me and the trails I ride. I don't like compromise so I've got 3 bikes to ensure the right gearing/handling for the different trails we've got around here. Once I'm confident I've got the right ratio then I'll order some nice surly cogs to prevent the wear on my freewheel. When I go to ride unfamiliar trails I'll likely carry the stack of stamped cogs along for the ride in case my normal gearing doesn't work out.
    This is exactly what I did. I got the SS conversion kit from Performance, and it came with a 16, 18 and 20T cog. Once I found the ratio I liked, I ordered a better cog from Surly. It is stronger, quieter and just looks better.
    '12 Soma Analog SS
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    '89 Fuji Saratoga
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  11. #11
    endlessgirl
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10speedbiopacefreewheel
    so obviously the stamped cogs are alot cheaper, and the machined cogs look pretty. but do i REALLY need to drop the money? i kinda want to buy a couple to experiment with sizes but why spend $100 if i don't have to? talk me out of going with a pyramid/cyclepro cog and give answers that appeal to functionality not bling ss snobbery. thanks guys.
    Though I understand that the Chinese need to eat too, most of the stamped as well as the Surly cogs seem to be made there, I prefer to support my country's economy. EndlessBikeCo's cogs are made in the USA by avid cyclists I believe the King cogs are made here too. Just a thought.

  12. #12
    HTFU!
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    Found some WTB cogs online for just over $14. They seem pretty solid. I have aluminum hubs and the stamped cogs were tearing them up...they gotta go.

  13. #13
    one chain loop
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    Quote Originally Posted by IMHO
    Found some WTB cogs online for just over $14. They seem pretty solid..
    pictures are deceiving. stay away from WTB's.
    everything sucks but my vacuum cleaner.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by fishcreek
    pictures are deceiving. stay away from WTB's.
    Could you elaborate with some specifics as I cannot find any negative reviews...any reviews actually.

  15. #15
    one chain loop
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    i personally bought one because it is (yes) cheap and it looked like a Chris King knock-off. i returned it right away because it didn't fit my cassette hub and to be honest i've never seen any cog that was poorly made like that. go for Surlys or if you really like cheap, like itsdoable recommended, Shimano DXR cogs for $6, make sure the cassette body is steel though.

    here's a review with a disturbing picture too.
    which ss cogs to get
    everything sucks but my vacuum cleaner.

  16. #16
    NardoSS
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    If hub shell is ALUMINUM then thin stamped cogs will damage them over a few weeks or months.

    If hub shell is STEEL then stick with the cheap ones because then it doesn't matter.

    A lot of people have nice bikes but a lot of people are also really slow on them. Spend where it matters. Just ask around, I bet you'll find people with spares to try out. I've had superb wear with a rear ti cog over two years. Hope this helps.

  17. #17
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    thanks everyone

    this is good info and makes sense, cheapies for intial gearing and steel freehubs, machined for less freehub damage. got it.
    no chain no gain.

  18. #18
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    I have stamped cogs and just found out about this problem. I don't know if my rear hub is steel or aluminum, it's a 2008 Stumpjumper comp 29er. the 2009 model has this "Custom Shimano M525 SL, alloy QR, 32h"
    __ o
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by aKore
    I don't know if my rear hub is steel or aluminum, it's a 2008 Stumpjumper comp 29er. the 2009 model has this "Custom Shimano M525 SL, alloy QR, 32h"
    Steel.
    Ride more!

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by asphaltdude
    Steel.
    cool, how do you know this?
    I went on shimano's website and looked at the deore rear hubs, all of them are aluminum.
    __ o
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    (_)>(_) .

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by aKore
    cool, how do you know this?
    I went on shimano's website and looked at the deore rear hubs, all of them are aluminum.
    I checked this page
    "Freehub Body Material steel "

    Shimano doesn't make aluminum freehubs, at least for mountain bike hubs. Even the newest XT has a steel freehub. XTR jumps up to a titanium freehub

  22. #22
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    I checked the same page, I thought what mattered was the hub shell.
    "Hub Shell aluminum/anodized"
    __ o
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    (_)>(_) .

  23. #23
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by aKore
    I checked the same page, I thought what mattered was the hub shell.
    "Hub Shell aluminum/anodized"
    Hub shell is the main body of the hub, the single piece that the disc mounts and flanges are a part of

  24. #24
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    ok cool, it looks like I wont need to shell out $23 for a surly then

    Thanks boomn
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  25. #25
    I know nothing
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    I checked this page
    "Freehub Body Material steel "

    Shimano doesn't make aluminum freehubs, at least for mountain bike hubs. Even the newest XT has a steel freehub. XTR jumps up to a titanium freehub

    Boomn, you have an Inbred, don't you? Do you know if the wheel (supplied when you buy a complete bike from them) has the soft or the hard hub? It says Planet X on it. Pretty bad pic attached.

    Here's what they say about the wheel on their site: "Our brand prebuilt wheelsets that are in stock now and ready to ship. Used on our complete bike packages, these wheels are based around a Reetard 29er disc or V rim with a Centrelock type disc mount hub, running on catridge bearings. Takes an 8 or 9spd cassette..."



    No point asking On-One since they rarely answer e-mails.

    I bought this Dimension 20t cog and I want to know if I can use for two weeks or two years. Pic from bike shop attached.


    Thanks
    Onkel
    Attached Images Attached Images

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