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  1. #1
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    SS - wheels - hubs - freewheels

    In selecting a wheelset for a new SS frame, i've seen many different products and haven't been able to figure something out. Would I have to go for a SS wheel set like this one, or could I just buy a regular wheel set like this one and add a free wheel like this ?

    Provided, they will fit my 135mm rear spacing. If or if they don't work, could someone explain why?

  2. #2
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    bump for great justice!

  3. #3
    Steamroller
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    I'd get SS cassette hubs

    IMHO SS cassette hubs are better in many ways..... chainline adjustability, price of cogs and ease of changing cogs for starters. You should be able to find a decent set for about the same price. These are $189 per set for example http://www.irocycle.com/id81.html I have a set on one of my bikes but, they are too new to tell how they hold up long term. I have high end hand built wheels with cassette hubs on my other SS bike.

    I don't see myself going back to a thread on freewheel cog for MTB use. I'd use that type for a road SS though.
    [SIZE=2]Two Wheeled and Too Big[/SIZE]

  4. #4
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    I guess i don't understand the difference between a freewheel and a single speed cog. Could someone explain?

  5. #5
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    freewheel
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    MySpace.com/DansJustChillin
    MySpace.com/DirtyBobbysBikes

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by dansjustchillin
    freewheel
    ok. All I'm looking for is a wheel in the back, attatched to a hub, attatched to some sort of chainwheel for SS. How will a freewheel like the one in that picture be different than what Mattman was saying about SS cassette hubs

  7. #7
    Steamroller
    Reputation: Mattman's Avatar
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    cassette

    Quote Originally Posted by cjh_mtb
    ok. All I'm looking for is a wheel in the back, attatched to a hub, attatched to some sort of chainwheel for SS. How will a freewheel like the one in that picture be different than what Mattman was saying about SS cassette hubs
    The freewheel Dan showed has the rachet mechanism inside the unit that screws off, if you change the gear you also change the rachet at the same time. This can be good if say you want to change your ratio and upgrade the performance of the mechanism at the same time.
    There are little notches and engagement pawls inside, better freewheels have more of them and hence more engagement points. More engagement points equals less turn of the crank before the wheel starts moving. Generally speaking faster engagement is the sign of a better freewheel. This same thing applies to freehub bodies on cassette hubs only with a cassette hub this mechanism is part of the hub and only the actual gear is removed. The freehub body is servicable and replaceable if needed on many hubs.

    You can put a good quality freewheel on a mediocre hub, or vice versa. Freewheels range from about $8-$80. The same applies to a cog for a cassette hub and they range from about $6-$45. You pretty much get what you pay for here.

    There is no problem using a regular MTB wheel with cassette style hub that origionally held an 8 or 9 speed gear cluster, you will just have to use more spacer to fill in the extra space. This also makes for a theoretically weaker wheel but in reality it should be fine. It may be much more economical to go this route especially if you already have a set.

    Did I explain this well?

    Here are a couple pics of hubs I have.
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    Last edited by Mattman; 07-20-2005 at 08:43 AM.
    [SIZE=2]Two Wheeled and Too Big[/SIZE]

  8. #8
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    I will try to explain it for you. Option 1 is to use a regular 9 speed cassette hub for your singlespeed, but you will need the following: a singlespeed cog (not a freewheel) and a bunch of spacers. The cog has a splined pattern just like a cassette and the spacers are used to take up the space that is usually occupied by the other cigs of a typical cassette. Option 2 is a threaded singlespeed hub, like the Surly one on first the link you posted. In order to use that wheel you also need a singlespeed freewheel, like the third link you posted. The third option is a Singespeed Cassette hub, like a Chris King or Nashbar one. These usually come with a cog and 2 spacers. For options 1 and 3, the freewheel mechanism is built into the hub, for option 2, the hub has no freewheeling mechanism, which is why a seperate freewheel/cog is required. There are pros and cons of each option, look at the FAQ and do some searches for more info.

    Mark

  9. #9
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    I get it now!

    thanks mattman and bikeny

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by max-a-mill
    one thing you might wanna consider if your bigger (like me) is with a dedicated siglespeed wheel (not a homebrew cassette wheel), your hub is wider at the flanges (where the spokes go) and that leads to a stronger, more laterally stiff, wheel than with the narrower spacing at the flanges you'd get with a cassette hub.

    that said i commuted on homebrew cassette hubs for a long time and they work great! probably cheaper to build and cheaper when it comes to replacing or changing your gearing. if your not hard on wheels you could definitely save a little money going this route.

    me however, as i build a wheel specifically for off-road use; i am going with a dedicated SS hub in hopes it will result in a stronger wheel.
    I will be going with the surly 1x1 hubs... an 16t freewheel on one side and a 20t on the other. Webcyclery has this hub with rhyno lite wheels front and rear for under $220. Just gotta save up for it.

  11. #11
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    one thing you might wanna consider if your bigger (like me) is with a dedicated siglespeed wheel (not a homebrew cassette wheel), your hub is wider at the flanges (where the spokes go) and that leads to a stronger, more laterally stiff, wheel than with the narrower spacing at the flanges you'd get with a cassette hub.

    that said i commuted on homebrew cassette hubs for a long time and they work great! probably cheaper to build and cheaper when it comes to replacing or changing your gearing. if your not hard on wheels you could definitely save a little money going this route.

    me however, as i build a wheel specifically for off-road use; i am going with a dedicated SS hub in hopes it will result in a stronger wheel.

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