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  1. #1
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    SS hub/wheel options

    I have a Monocog that I am considering purschasing a new set of lighter weight wheels for. Is there any disadvantage to just using a standard geared rear wheel? They seem to be more plentiful with more pre-built options out there. To do this, I realize I need to purchase the Surly adapter washers for my chain tensioners so they will work with a QR as well as spacers for the cog. I also realize the dish of the wheel will be more more severe for a standard 9-spd free-hub body hub compared to the short free-hub on the Redline hubs. Any other issues I should be aware of or is this what most people do? I can build my own wheels but don't want to spend the $$ on the fancy SS-specific hubs - ~$300 would be my max on these wheels and that is probably pushing it with the cost of the bike. Any other good options (completes or hubs for a build)? I am thinking thet ~$200 set on Pricepoint with Mavic rims and XT hubs looks ok.

    Thanks
    Last edited by TiGeo; 05-05-2010 at 05:52 AM.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

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  2. #2
    holy schfincter..
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    I am in the same boat, planning on building up a SS specific 29er. Prebuild SS specific wheels are pricey and hard to find. especially for a 29er.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by TigerRider
    I am in the same boat, planning on building up a SS specific 29er. Prebuild SS specific wheels are pricey and hard to find. especially for a 29er.
    A geared hub allows for a greater range of adjustability for the chain line, but the ss hub can be lighter and a bit stronger. I have been running race x lite geared hub since 07 and it has never failed. PLus if you have geared ride, you can swap out.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by TiGeo
    I am thinking thet ~$200 set on Pricepoint with Mavic rims and XT hubs looks ok
    Those XT hubs (M756) can be easily and cheaply converted to a nutted solid axle. I think the axles run about $10-15 each or your LBS should be able to do it for not much more. Plus you won't have to buy the tuggnutt washers

    I wouldn't worry about dish. I'm not convinced the difference in stiffness could be noticed by most people under most riding conditions. And look at how many geared wheels are out there being ridden hard with all that dish!

  5. #5
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    surly hubs with stans rims. can't go wrong.
    Ride & Smile

  6. #6
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    to stay in the 200$ range, you best bet is what boomn recommended, convert the xt hub to a nutted axle. i just built a set of wheels for my MC using hope pro2's (bolt on rear hub) and velocity P35's. parts were 425$. the rims aren't any lighter than the stockers, but the 35mm wide rims are sweet. made a big difference in ride/handling with large volume tires.

  7. #7
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    I run geared wheels with QR and have no issues at all. However, i wouldnt change to a bolt on axle unless it was hollow. I tried converting my old shimano hubs to bolt ons and i bent about 3 axles before i gave up and went back to QR. They all were heat treated alloy axles, so i dont think it was a quality issue. Solid axles bend much easier than hollow axles. Still not sure how i got away with solid on the BMX.

  8. #8
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    Ebay baby! I have seen a ton of 29rs on there. Basically because I am looking for a 26er set up and all I keep finding is 29's. Right now there is a set of (26") WTB Laser Disc rims with Surly SS hubs on there going for $99 and a buy it now price of $199. Not a bad deal really but I know me. I want something custom and higher end which means that I am going to have to pay so my stock wheels will have to do for now while I sock some money away.

  9. #9
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ISuckAtRiding
    They all were heat treated alloy axles, so i dont think it was a quality issue. Solid axles bend much easier than hollow axles. Still not sure how i got away with solid on the BMX.
    This is similar to a common misconception in car fabrication that solid rod if weaker than tubing. If it's the same material, it's absolutely not true. Basic stress calculations will prove it (and yes, the calculations have been proven by years of experimentation). As for strength to weight ratio, tubing is way better as most of the stress is handled at the outer circumference of the rod/tubing...you just remove that middle material that doesn't do a whole lot for bending strength.

    However......you can have the same material that has been cold worked (drawn over a mandel or known as DOM tubing) to make a much harder material. This is why tubing may be stronger than solid rod in many circumstances, as solid rod isn't usually cold worked but tubing is.

    Anyway...I suspect something else was up with your thru axle. It was ether different material, drawn differently, or just something else was up.

    Either way...you found what works for you, and that's what matters. Just wanted to debunk the solid vs hollow strength myth.

    -Nick

  11. #11
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    QR will be fine. I'm using QR without a tug and have been for a bit and it does fine. With a tug, which is my preference (I just can't run it in the current configuration) the tension remains perfect until I flat. The bonus is that I don't have to take a 15mm everywhere.

    And since I'm dispensing crap, I might as well mention that a 200 dollar wheelset on a Monocog is perfect. I have one too. On occasion I strongly consider buying some part or another to lighten it up (carbon fork? Schwalbe RR?) I remember it still is a brick. Which has never really been a bad thing....

  12. #12
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    How old is the Monocog? Early models had 110mm hub spacing on the back wheel (bmx size) where as MTB spacing is 135mm which is on the later models. Ask me how I know....grrrr what a PITA to find a 26" wheel with a 110mm freewheel/hub.

  13. #13
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    I thought the old ones were 120mm. Not that would be easier to find.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by umarth
    I thought the old ones were 120mm. Not that would be easier to find.
    nope, 110mm is correct. The 'Cog evolved out of Redline's strong BMX foundation where 110mm is the standard

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