Results 1 to 29 of 29
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    41

    ss front chainring advice ?

    hello
    recently converted my pivot les 29" to ss. i am putting a new crank on it and need to buy a chainring for it. curious to hear some thoughts on front chainring size.

    assuming i would select a rear cog to maintain something close to my current ratio (1.578), what is the difference in choosing a 34, 32, or 30 front ring? i climb a lot on most of my rides.

    also, i was planning on buying wolf tooth stuff, which i notice say run a 10 or 11spd chain. it was advised i should run a 8 or 9spd chain.

    i currently run a 30/19, ride rocky (sw pa similar to central pa), and hilly (steep) terrain. im 210lbs.

    thoughts?

    cheers

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    36
    I ran a 32 for years but recently went to a 34 as I feel it gives me a wider range of gearing options. I do some gravel races were I was putting on a 32x15 and still could have used more gear inches. I like the 34 as I can cover all the types of riding I do from extremely hilly to flat and fast. With your hilly and steep terrain you could run a 34x20 or 22 perhaps. I run 8 speed chains as I have never had one snap so have just stuck with it. I also run an absolute black oval but that is another discussion.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    46
    If you ride rocky terrain, you could consider getting a bashguard and the smallest ring you can find, for more BB clearance. Your ratio is quite low. You could go as small as 22T, which can be geared as high as 22-12 (1.83) or as low as you want. 22-14 would get you 1.57 ratio, same as what you are using now. Few less links on the chain and a few grams saved from smaller cog/ring to offset the added weight of a bashguard.

    Here is the ring I just got for Sram direct mount, with integrated bash guard.

    https://www.tartybikes.co.uk/bash_ri.../c1p13344.html

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ARandomBiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    1,937
    I run 28x18 normally, its a weird choice, but it works out to be just between 32x21 and 32x20, or very close to 34x22. It's spinny but I hate walking, have never been able to 'mash' big slow cadence, and often ride with geared riders who granny-down at hills so I stall out on 32xteens.

    I have never had an issue with wear (RF rings and Surly cogs), or throwing the chain. It also fortuitously works out that I can pull the sliders way forward, vs 34x22 where they're way back.
    ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Yeah, why not?

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,822
    Quote Originally Posted by MidnightFattie View Post
    If you ride rocky terrain, you could consider getting a bashguard and the smallest ring you can find[/URL]
    politely disagree; ditch the bashguard! the chain will slide over most stuff it makes contact with just fine. but if your hitting your ring a lot i'd say work on your technique. only time my chainring hits is when i mess up. That said our terrain is more big logs less big rocks...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jS1Lv3Bv94
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9v2AHjhUrPc

    granted my skill set is firmly planted at about vid#1 but i aspire to vid#2

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: RajunCajun44's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,767
    i don't understand why folks replace old cranksets for a 1x conversion... you can simply buy a narrow wide ring with the same bcd and screw it on... I have that setup on two of my bikes (one of those bikes is gone now) and it worked with no issues...

    as far as the ring size I would suggest whatever is the best deal in the range 30T-34T

  7. #7
    wanna ride bikes?
    Reputation: *OneSpeed*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    3,782
    Quote Originally Posted by MidnightFattie View Post
    If you ride rocky terrain, you could consider getting a bashguard and the smallest ring you can find, for more BB clearance. Your ratio is quite low. You could go as small as 22T, which can be geared as high as 22-12 (1.83) or as low as you want. 22-14 would get you 1.57 ratio, same as what you are using now. Few less links on the chain and a few grams saved from smaller cog/ring to offset the added weight of a bashguard.

    Here is the ring I just got for Sram direct mount, with integrated bash guard.

    https://www.tartybikes.co.uk/bash_ri.../c1p13344.html
    Terrible idea IMO. I'm not a fan of micro-drive. Higher chain tension, faster wear, less chain retention, etc. I also agree the bashguard is unnecessary.

    I run 34:20 with lots of punchy climbing, previously on 32:18. I'm also a big fan of oval chainrings so if your going with Wolftooth, give the oval version a try. I've also had good luck with Surly cogs, though I'm about to try two Endless cogs very soon.
    Rigid SS 29er
    Fat Lefty
    SS MonsterCross
    SS cyclocross
    all steel

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    41
    Quote Originally Posted by RajunCajun44 View Post
    i don't understand why folks replace old cranksets for a 1x conversion...
    i have a stages power meter (XT crank) on another mtb that i would like to also use on this SS rig. the SS bike shipped with a race face crank. thanks for the response!

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    41
    those videos are cool! i def dont want to go lower than a 30 or 32 in the front. i suppose i am going to go with a 32x20. the 34/22 might be slightly too much and suspect i will spin out faster, a 34/20 is too tall. i think ill live out the rest if the season on a 32/20. wolf tooth does not appear to make a 21. i know there are other brands but ill keep it all the same this time.

    i considered an oval ring. i guess its one of those things i just need to try for myself. does the oval affect chain tension at all?

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: RajunCajun44's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,767
    Quote Originally Posted by jayzoll View Post
    i have a stages power meter (XT crank) on another mtb that i would like to also use on this SS rig. the SS bike shipped with a race face crank. thanks for the response!
    well that explains it... thanks... makes sense... but yeah... I don't think tooth size matters, but I have heard smaller rings wear slightly faster... 30t-34t will work

  11. #11
    wanna ride bikes?
    Reputation: *OneSpeed*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    3,782
    Quote Originally Posted by jayzoll View Post
    does the oval affect chain tension at all?
    Not enough to matter.
    Rigid SS 29er
    Fat Lefty
    SS MonsterCross
    SS cyclocross
    all steel

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  12. #12
    eri
    eri is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: eri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    368
    My focus, pick the ratio you want, then choose the pair of gears that lets you use the shortest chain (shortest chainstays). For me that is 34x23.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dbhammercycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    2,644
    I like my Absolute Black 34T oval and my 18 tooth WI freewheel, no guard, for a ratio that is good enough for the road and can be challenging at times on the trail. There is minimal change in the tension and the chain line is good, never dropped a chain.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    Terrible idea IMO. I'm not a fan of micro-drive. Higher chain tension, faster wear, less chain retention, etc. I also agree the bashguard is unnecessary.

    I run 34:20 with lots of punchy climbing, previously on 32:18. I'm also a big fan of oval chainrings so if your going with Wolftooth, give the oval version a try. I've also had good luck with Surly cogs, though I'm about to try two Endless cogs very soon.
    I guess it just depends on how you ride. I enjoy trying to trials my way over burly rocks and other obstacles, and having no bashguard limits what I'm able to comfortably attempt. If you are the type of rider that hike a bikes over hard stuff or avoids it entirely, hitting the chain ring is not really a concern so you don't need a bashguard.

    I suppose there is merit to the argument that the microdrive will wear out your chain and cogs a little faster. It makes sense from a physics standpoint, but I have yet to see this. I set the chain tension the same on either setup, and if your chainline is straight and chain tensioned, you should have no dropped chains, ever, unless your frame is just too flexy. The benefits of this setup are more BB clearance and less weight. Again, if you don't attempt challenging stuff where hitting the chainring is a possiblity, you probably are find with a standard 32t ring and no guard.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by max-a-mill View Post
    politely disagree; ditch the bashguard! the chain will slide over most stuff it makes contact with just fine. but if your hitting your ring a lot i'd say work on your technique. only time my chainring hits is when i mess up. That said our terrain is more big logs less big rocks...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jS1Lv3Bv94
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9v2AHjhUrPc

    granted my skill set is firmly planted at about vid#1 but i aspire to vid#2
    Those are cool videos, and precisely the reason why you would want a bashguard. If you are into challenging yourself and want to try surmounting larger obstacles, or weaving your way through large rock gardens, hitting your chainring happens. If you are not riding that challenging of stuff and never hit your ring, you are fine without.

    For me, having no bashguard means reluctance to attempt anything that may result in a hitting the ring if I don't nail it, so it limits my riding. Even with a bashguard, I try not to use it, but it gives peace of mind that it's ok to go for it. Also, hitting logs is not nearly as likely to bend your ring or damage your chain than hitting rocks.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,822
    i hit my chain/chainring all the time (granted more on logs than rocks) never had a problem with the chain or a folded ring. you swap the chain out a couple times a year anyhow...

    for me a bashguard is a solution for a non existent problem (think about it; how many of the new 1x bikes come with a bashguard).

    they were useful in the olden days when you had a multi-iring setup and could get the chainrings teeth caught on something if you were not in the largest front ring. that will destroy a chainring fast (and send you into the dirt the bars when the teeth bite into a soft log and stop you in your tracks).

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ARandomBiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    1,937
    Bash guards were helpful to me when I was on a 2x or 3x with soft stamped steel rings. those bent like butter with a decent smack on a granite boulder.

    With a chain protecting a stout N/W ring I've not had a problem.
    ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Yeah, why not?

  18. #18
    wanna ride bikes?
    Reputation: *OneSpeed*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    3,782
    Quote Originally Posted by MidnightFattie View Post
    I guess it just depends on how you ride. I enjoy trying to trials my way over burly rocks and other obstacles, and having no bashguard limits what I'm able to comfortably attempt. If you are the type of rider that hike a bikes over hard stuff or avoids it entirely, hitting the chain ring is not really a concern so you don't need a bashguard.

    I suppose there is merit to the argument that the microdrive will wear out your chain and cogs a little faster. It makes sense from a physics standpoint, but I have yet to see this. I set the chain tension the same on either setup, and if your chainline is straight and chain tensioned, you should have no dropped chains, ever, unless your frame is just too flexy. The benefits of this setup are more BB clearance and less weight. Again, if you don't attempt challenging stuff where hitting the chainring is a possiblity, you probably are find with a standard 32t ring and no guard.
    Your so enduro bro!

    You clearly don't understand what I mean by tension on the chain, I'm not going to bother explaining it to you.
    Rigid SS 29er
    Fat Lefty
    SS MonsterCross
    SS cyclocross
    all steel

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    Your so enduro bro!

    You clearly don't understand what I mean by tension on the chain, I'm not going to bother explaining it to you.
    Not sure what you mean there. Please share your infinite wisdom on a pleb like me.

    As far as the microdrive causing more wear, sure the rollers have to move a little more to make it around the smaller gears. But does this cause any more added wear than a chain snaking back and forth through a derailleur? I just don't see this as being much of a concern. Like the other poster above mentioned, I change chains fairly often at $20 a pop, which is pennies in this hobby.

    Then of course there is the skipping concern. Last time I checked, most street BMX guys are running 25-9 or similar, without any issues...is this really a concern on a proper single speed setup? If it were, they wouldn't use it, because a skipping chain could cause serious injury when attempting their stunts. And you can be sure that they put bursts of well over 1000 watts into their drivetrain, frequently. It's a non-issue with proper chain tension.

    I see you and many others are strongly opposed to bash guards as being unnecessary, or perhaps even for less skillful riders.

    Here's some kids who have leagues more bike handling skill than 99.8% of the posters on this forum will ever have. They ride single speed, no 3x drivetrain to protect, and every last one of them has a bashguard.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2VQIH-AqppI

    Again, it comes to how you ride. If you are a road-centric XC racer who likes to sit and spin like a madman and hikes over the tough stuff (or avoids it entirely), you are fine without. If you are more of a hard charger/adventurous type and like to attempt harder stuff where you might hit your ring if you don't execute perfectly, it's good to have. Of course there are several shades of gray between these two, but calling a 22t ring with integrated bash guard is a "terrible idea" may be just from your perspective and riding style.

  20. #20
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    2,309
    I dunno, I prefer to have more teeth than a 12, you really only have like 5 teeth actually engaged with the chain and a lot of force; I run an 18.
    "I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by." -Douglas Adams.

  21. #21
    eri
    eri is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: eri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    368
    The only time i broke a chain it was 20 minutes afterr scraping over a rock. Now im lots more carefuland walk stuff when i'm doubt. Never tried a bashguard and now I'm tempted.
    the truth is always a gift because it offers the recipient of that information the chance to change the outcome - Grace Choi

  22. #22
    NedwannaB
    Reputation: JMac47's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    10,504
    Anyone using a N/W chain ring notice any more drag on the chain vs a non dropstop ring?
    Wait whuuut, who did he tell you that!?!?....

  23. #23
    meow, meow.
    Reputation: J. Random Psycho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,379
    My setup since 2013 is: Shimano Zee crankset, cheap steel chainring (Truvativ 32T), bashguard sized for 32T (e13 Turbocharger). I'm on a 26" though.

    I think micro drive starts to suck (clearly accelerated chain wear and lower efficiency) when you go below 14T on the cog. That's not going to happen with most bigger wheeled singlespeeds.

    The reasoning behind my choice of parts:

    1. The crankset is cheap and bulletproof. Forged, solid arms shaped so as to slow down fatigue cracks. Tabs are one piece with DS crank arm and they are beefy enough to carry loads from bashguard hits. Steel pedal thread inserts.

    2. Minimalist, dedicated, reversible, cheap chainring, the only purpose of which is to hold up to wear from chain. Value is through the roof.

    3. Dedicated (separate) bashguard to protect ring and chain, and add confidence for trying to get over hard obstacles. Just like what MF said. No matter how much I practice there's always a good chance to fail on a familiar obstacle.

    4. The size of chainring. Minimum that 104 BCD can run without resorting to expensive chainrings, while letting the cog still be above micro drive size. A balance of ground clearance, efficiency, and value. And (thanks to frame design) I get the lowest effective chainstay length this way, too!


    As an experiment (as in, I knew that steel ring with bashguard is better for me, but decided to risk it for the last time) I ran Truvativ AKA crankset with 28T MRP aluminum ring, which was the beefiest one I could find back in 2011, on the same bike. It was fine, except for chainring wear, until I messed up bunny hopping a boulder, and bent the ring.

    These days though there's a 28T, thick, heavy, steel X-Sync ring being made by SRAM. I've got one waiting for a build.
    26" rigid SS 4130 BB7 nylon-flats ESI latex-tubes non-lubricated-8spd

  24. #24
    wanna ride bikes?
    Reputation: *OneSpeed*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    3,782
    Quote Originally Posted by JMac47 View Post
    Anyone using a N/W chain ring notice any more drag on the chain vs a non dropstop ring?
    They're definitely noisier, drag may be a little more but not enough to bother me.
    Rigid SS 29er
    Fat Lefty
    SS MonsterCross
    SS cyclocross
    all steel

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  25. #25
    NedwannaB
    Reputation: JMac47's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    10,504
    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    They're definitely noisier, drag may be a little more but not enough to bother me.
    Wasn't thinking about noise since no crosschaining like on my 1x geared fs. Plus side is it will eliminate the need to give other riders an "on your left" as I motor on by...
    Wait whuuut, who did he tell you that!?!?....

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sfgiantsfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    1,458
    Quote Originally Posted by MidnightFattie View Post
    Not sure what you mean there. Please share your infinite wisdom on a pleb like me.

    As far as the microdrive causing more wear, sure the rollers have to move a little more to make it around the smaller gears. But does this cause any more added wear than a chain snaking back and forth through a derailleur? I just don't see this as being much of a concern. Like the other poster above mentioned, I change chains fairly often at $20 a pop, which is pennies in this hobby.

    Then of course there is the skipping concern. Last time I checked, most street BMX guys are running 25-9 or similar, without any issues...is this really a concern on a proper single speed setup? If it were, they wouldn't use it, because a skipping chain could cause serious injury when attempting their stunts. And you can be sure that they put bursts of well over 1000 watts into their drivetrain, frequently. It's a non-issue with proper chain tension.

    I see you and many others are strongly opposed to bash guards as being unnecessary, or perhaps even for less skillful riders.

    Here's some kids who have leagues more bike handling skill than 99.8% of the posters on this forum will ever have. They ride single speed, no 3x drivetrain to protect, and every last one of them has a bashguard.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2VQIH-AqppI

    Again, it comes to how you ride. If you are a road-centric XC racer who likes to sit and spin like a madman and hikes over the tough stuff (or avoids it entirely), you are fine without. If you are more of a hard charger/adventurous type and like to attempt harder stuff where you might hit your ring if you don't execute perfectly, it's good to have. Of course there are several shades of gray between these two, but calling a 22t ring with integrated bash guard is a "terrible idea" may be just from your perspective and riding style.
    I see a couple of bikes without bash gaurds in that video. They also don't have seats or front brakes
    I'm sick of all the Irish stereotypes, as soon as I finish this beer I"m punching someone

  27. #27
    eri
    eri is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: eri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    368
    Quote Originally Posted by MidnightFattie View Post
    Not sure what you mean there. Please share your infinite wisdom on a pleb like me.

    As far as the microdrive causing more wear, sure the rollers have to move a little more to make it around the smaller gears. But does this cause any more added wear than a chain snaking back and forth through a derailleur? I just don't see this as being much of a concern. Like the other poster above mentioned, I change chains fairly often at $20 a pop, which is pennies in this hobby.

    Then of course there is the skipping concern. Last time I checked, most street BMX guys are running 25-9 or similar, without any issues...is this really a concern on a proper single speed setup? If it were, they wouldn't use it, because a skipping chain could cause serious injury when attempting their stunts. And you can be sure that they put bursts of well over 1000 watts into their drivetrain, frequently. It's a non-issue with proper chain tension.

    I see you and many others are strongly opposed to bash guards as being unnecessary, or perhaps even for less skillful riders.

    Here's some kids who have leagues more bike handling skill than 99.8% of the posters on this forum will ever have. They ride single speed, no 3x drivetrain to protect, and every last one of them has a bashguard.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2VQIH-AqppI

    Again, it comes to how you ride. If you are a road-centric XC racer who likes to sit and spin like a madman and hikes over the tough stuff (or avoids it entirely), you are fine without. If you are more of a hard charger/adventurous type and like to attempt harder stuff where you might hit your ring if you don't execute perfectly, it's good to have. Of course there are several shades of gray between these two, but calling a 22t ring with integrated bash guard is a "terrible idea" may be just from your perspective and riding style.
    There is increased friction as cog sizes decrease. I had a chart once but can't find it. Use the nine if you need it but you'd be better off if you just ride with a larger chainring.


    https://cyclingtips.com/2010/04/the-...cal-advantage/
    the truth is always a gift because it offers the recipient of that information the chance to change the outcome - Grace Choi

  28. #28
    Armature speller
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    2,320
    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    They're definitely noisier, drag may be a little more but not enough to bother me.
    Drag should only be slightly more if the chain line isn't perfect and the inner chain plates constantly touch the chainring.
    Mine is pretty quiet, but I haven't run anything other than N/W on my single speeds.
    Actually, my CX bike had a 38t normal ring, but the Singulator transmitted chain noise to the frame

  29. #29
    wanna ride bikes?
    Reputation: *OneSpeed*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    3,782
    ^ yeah, if you started with a NW you may not really notice it as it's very minor in both cases. I only noticed it because it was a bike I was very familiar with and the only thing that changed was the chainring.
    Rigid SS 29er
    Fat Lefty
    SS MonsterCross
    SS cyclocross
    all steel

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-05-2015, 06:23 PM
  2. XX1 chainring vs Wolftooth/RaceFace chainring?
    By Alias530 in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 06-03-2015, 06:39 AM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-06-2014, 07:46 AM
  4. Chain jumping from small chainring to middle chainring
    By menusk in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 04-07-2013, 10:31 PM
  5. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-04-2011, 07:02 PM

Members who have read this thread: 99

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •