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  1. #1
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    Small ss freewheel - english threads?

    has anybody here seen any single-speed freewheels that are less than 16t with english threading?

    i busted myself up pretty good recently & the doc ordered me to stay off the trails for quite awhile. this time i am going to listen to him. i plan to ride this bike on the pavement for the time being but it is sooo flat here that it is too spinny. have been looking for a smaller freewheel to give it better road manners but everything i find under 16t is metric. i want to change as little as possible & thought this would be easier than swapping to a bigger chainring. can anyone point me to any smaller freewheels that i can just screw onto my english threaded hub?

    thanx for any suggestions...

  2. #2
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    What is english threaded hub? Is that different with other threaded hub?

    I've seen somewhere on this forum 14T freewheel I believe it's shimano.

  3. #3
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    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/freewheels.html

    Type Inch Metric
    Italian 1.378" x 24 tpi 35 x 1.058 mm
    U.S.A. 1.375" x 24 tpi 34.92 x 1.058 mm
    British 1.370" x 24 tpi 34.80 x 1.058 mm
    French 1.366" x 25.4 tpi 34.7 x 1 mm
    Metric BMX 1.181" x 25.4 tpi 30 x 1 mm

  4. #4
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    you need a BMX flipflop hub for smaller freewheels. there is no way to get the bearings and pawls inside a freewheel smaller than 16t, so the threaded part of the hub needs to be smaller.



    this hub has standard threads for 16t+ freewheels on one side and smaller threaded area for 13-15t freewheels. Odyssey, ACS, Dicta, KHE, and a few other companies make I small freewheels, but don't know if anyone makes a hub that accepts 13t freewheels with 135mm spacing. they are mostly 110mm spacing for BMX bikes. a 110mm spaced bmx hub will not work on your mountain bike if it's a standard mountain bike.

    DK made a limited run of 12t freewheels, but they were notorious for shattering. avoid.

    the easiest, cheapest thing to do would be to get a larger chainring and a longer chain.
    Last edited by mack_turtle; 11-03-2010 at 06:48 PM.

  5. #5
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    thanx for the info mack_turtle!
    was hoping against hope but kinda figured that was the case.
    can i get that hub?
    since i'm hoping this is a temporary situation & i really like my ring & chain...
    after doing some checking, it looks like if i can learn myself to ride fixie, there are smaller fixed cogs that will fit onto my hub.
    i have always been a big advocate of expanding one's horizons, so maybe i should give it a try, hmmm?
    unless there are any other suggestions?
    ok...wish me luck...

  6. #6
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    the hub i posted is a BMX hub, it will not work on a mountain bike. most of the hubs that will accept smaller freewheels are also bmx, so i doubt you will find one that will fit on a mountain bike. you need something with 135mm spacing, but bmx hubs are 110mm.

    you could also try a regular mountain bike hub that has a freehub instead of a SS freewheel. get a small ss cog and some spacers for it. the question is: do you love your chainring enough that you would rather buy a whole new wheel instead of a chainring? replacing the chainring (temporarily, until you can ride trails again) would be a lot cheaper than a whole new wheel.

    also, if you want to go fixed, you can put a track cog and a bottom bracket lock ring on it, but this is what is known as a "suicide hub." try riding one in traffic without brakes for a little while you'll find out why! a proper fixed/track hub has a reverse-threaded lockring.

    if you have a disc brake, you can bolt a Tomicog onto your hub and make it fixed that way too.
    Last edited by mack_turtle; 11-03-2010 at 07:14 PM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle
    if you have a disc brake, you can bolt a Tomicog onto your hub and make it fixed that way too.
    But it'll still be limited to 16t.

    Just get a new chainring.

  8. #8
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    i had a 14t for english threads back in the mid 90's. It was an ACS, and it was even rare back then.

  9. #9
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    just found this:
    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...3#ht_500wt_922
    looks like 15t freewheel is as small as anything comes for english threads & i am sick of searching.
    i wonder, is a 1 tooth difference worth it?
    guess i'm going chainring shopping this afternoon...
    Last edited by markaitch; 11-04-2010 at 12:13 PM.

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