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  1. #1
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    Single speed in the city questions.

    The first two paragraphs are just talk.
    Just bought a bike (a Schwinn Ranger) the other day. I'm 33, and this is the first bike I've had since I was a kid. I'm a physical person, so I've been taking the bike out and beating on it pretty hard. Whether or not this bike is meant for this kind of treatment is a matter of perspective. My perspective is that $120 bicycles are meant to be thrashed. If it cost more than $1k, I'd be scared to take it out of the garage.

    So, the thought occurred to me that since I haven't bothered switching gears on it at all anyway and the chain slips off the gears sometimes when I ride off of something more than curb height, I'd look into what I thought would be the simple process of switching it to a SS bike. That's how I found this place. The conversion looks like a real PITA, so I've decided to wait and see how much riding I do over the next few months and just build a SS from scratch if I'm still interested.

    Onto the ??s
    I live in Houston. No hills, no wrist-wrecking trails, just an occasional slam into or off of something. Are there inexpensive frames out there for this kind of casual use? Most of the guys on this site seem like hard-core racers.

    Will my chain stay on better?

    Can a guy put one of these together for a few hundred bucks without a bunch of jerry-rigged parts? I want something I'm not afraid to break.

    -Shay

  2. #2
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    The off the shelf Walmart, Target, etc bikes will last about a year less if your doing aggresive street or DJ their just not designd to take that kind of abuse. You might want to look into the Specialized P series bikes and you can pick on up on eBay for a few c-notes.
    We're not all hard-core racers, we're just bikers.

  3. #3
    i ride bikez!!11!
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    A Monocog with some slicks and taller gearing would suit you well.

  4. #4
    meh... whatever
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    +1 for the monocog
    "Knowledge is good." ~ Emil Faber

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by txcowboy
    The off the shelf Walmart, Target, etc bikes will last about a year less if your doing aggresive street or DJ
    Looks like I've got my work cut out for me , because I am in love with that Monocog (definitely with the slicks). I knew there had to be something like that out there.

    Thank you all very much.

    -Shay

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by txcowboy
    The off the shelf Walmart, Target, etc bikes will last about a year less if your doing aggresive street or DJ their just not designd to take that kind of abuse.
    Two weeks.

    My rear wheel is destroyed. I'm really bummed about it. I didn't treat it that roughly. Looks like biking is a more expensive hobby than I realized it would be. I'm on a budget until October (Wife's student loans), so I'm bike-less for the Summer.

    I've got a blessing/curse. I don't get much pleasure out of owning things. I've got N-1 disease. Makes it less rewarding to commit financially to recreation. But I do miss my bike.

    -Shay

  7. #7
    (Ali)
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShayAllen
    I'm on a budget until October (Wife's student loans), so I'm bike-less for the Summer.
    If you don't ride now, your health expenses in the future will be far more than your wife's current loan payments. Buy the bike before paying off loans.

    Ali

  8. #8
    ravingbikefiend
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    I've built my SS and fixed gear bikes on a pretty limited budget and they have held up wonderfully.

    For urban riding and commuting an old road bike can be converted very cheaply and easily.
    I ride with 65'er...he's a mountain goat....But then again, we need to throw him in the mud and pack his pockets with lead shot before a scale will read him. - Psycho Mike

    -Environmental stickers don't mean shite when they are stuck to CARS!-

  9. #9
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    My sentiments exactly. My first SS commuter was an early eighties Univega I snagged on Craigs list for $120. It had already been converted to SS and was in great running condition.

    Obviously, you can't be crashing into curbs on a road bike, but for your average city commuting, you really shouldn't need anything more than that. If you really think you need a mountain bike, cruise craigs until you find an old Trek or Specialized. They may not be shiny or new, but at least they're made to last.
    All the Dude ever wanted was his rug back.

  10. #10
    ravingbikefiend
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    You shouldn't be crashing into curbs on anything...it tends to mess up the wheels.

    I just converted my Miyata 215 ST road / touring bike into an SS as it wasn't flipping my switch as a gearie... of the bikes I own (11), more than half (6) are singlespeeds or fixed gear bikes.

    The Miyata runs out pretty nicely with the 48:18 gearing I set it up with and is rigged and rugged enough for some cross country riding as well as an urban commute.
    I ride with 65'er...he's a mountain goat....But then again, we need to throw him in the mud and pack his pockets with lead shot before a scale will read him. - Psycho Mike

    -Environmental stickers don't mean shite when they are stuck to CARS!-

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