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  1. #1
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    Seat posts, am I fat???

    Ok, so some of you may have read some of my other posts and are aware that I have bent 2 different seat posts since this spring. First one was the stock EC30 Easton, second was an Ebay Ti post. I then moved on to a Thompson laid back but didn't care for the angled look so I picked up a Ritchey WCS. I like it because the bore in the post itself is similar to the Thompson with the front and back being thicker. But I want something Ti!

    I know there are a few of you out there with some nice posts. I have sent an email to BlackSheep and am waiting to hear back. Here is my question/concern.

    I am 5'9" and weigh right about 180-84 lbs. I would not say that I am fat or even look fat at all. I spent the past two years up to this part March in the gym. It was a nice change from riding all the time but I burned out. But not before putting on about 25 lbs. I was up to 195 and since riding this spring dropped back down about 15 lbs. But my seat posts still don't seem to like it.

    I am riding a steel GT that has a 27.2 post. Part of me thinks that the frame required a larger post, I probably wouldn't have this problem. But I don't have the funds to swap out my frame just yet so I want to find a post.

    I swear though, I have been seeing a bunch of posts discussing frames and guys throwing out their height/weight and I am starting to feel fat or that I am border line Clydesdale! Am I really that frickn big? Hard to believe that could be the case. I mean, I am seeing guys at 6'1" weighing 180 or 5'9" weighing 153!

  2. #2
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    Just to clarify, looking for a laid back or offset post in a 330-350mm at 27.2mm. Lynskey for example appears to only come in a straight post and a 31.4. I might at that it looks almost identical to the one that I bent. Oh, I have about 9.25" of post showing out of the frame.
    Last edited by 1SPD; 09-18-2010 at 09:51 PM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1SPD
    I have about 9.25" of post showing out of the frame.
    sure, if you measure it from the taint.



    Everyone is built differently, i dont believe in "you should weigh this much if you're this tall".

    I'm 6'1-6'2, 180ish and i dont bend my seatposts (probably because i use a zero offset post, so less stress there), but i do break all my frames at the seat tube/top tube weld. I broke my last 3 fames there, all within a year per frame. If you ride in saddle more often than not, and you ride on slightly bumpy terrain, **** tends to fail.

  4. #4
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  5. #5
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    im 5'9" and weigh 200 pounds and I have bent my original post as well. moved on to a sinz bmx seatpost that is working like a champ
    "If women don't find handsome , they should at least find you handy."-Red Green

  6. #6
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    I started back into riding in June and I was 260 then, all I ran, until now, was the Thomson Elite posts and I never bent one. If you are bending seat posts are you not getting out of the saddle on descents and when you ride over things?

  7. #7
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    you are way to fat you should quit riding right away


    lol

  8. #8
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    I would look more at your riding style. If you are encountering any types of roots or bumps, you need to be off the seat, especially on a hardtail. Your legs will absorb shocks much better and your weight will be able to transfer much easier allowing for less weighting of the rear wheel as you hit the bumps. That is going to translate into carrying more speed through bumpy sections. The only time you should be on your seat is during flat, spinny sections.
    Just my thoughts,
    Jesse
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  9. #9
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    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by orion_134
    I would look more at your riding style. If you are encountering any types of roots or bumps, you need to be off the seat, especially on a hardtail. Your legs will absorb shocks much better and your weight will be able to transfer much easier allowing for less weighting of the rear wheel as you hit the bumps. That is going to translate into carrying more speed through bumpy sections. The only time you should be on your seat is during flat, spinny sections.
    Just my thoughts,
    Jesse

    What he said X2. What size frame on your bike? Are you close to the minimum insertion line? The more seatpost that is exposed gives more leverage to bend it. Also the proper fore/aft position of the seat on the post matters as well. Lets see a picture or two of your setup before we make too many ASSumptions.

  10. #10
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    Ok, let me clarify, I have an 18" frame and am about 1" shy of the minimum insertion line on the post (330mm). My fore/aft position is set up fine which is why I need the offset post.

    Now, I have been riding for many years. I raced for over 13 years as a roadie (with about 8 of that as a CAT 3). I have been off and on mtbs for at least 15 years now. I have also been into bmx bikes so I understand standing up to ride, jump, grinds...

    I ride a fully rigid 26er w/ Race King 2.2 tires (tire height on these tires is very close to a 2.4) I stand up when ever I go over stuff unless I don't see it. I bunny hop over logs and make it a point to clear them without hitting my chainring or banging my rear wheel into them. I try to stay seated when climbing as long as possible. I have 24" quads for crying out loud and 15" calfs and stand an astounding 5'9" on a good day!

    I think it is basically a leverage issue at this point. Below is a quick video in my first and only mtb race from about a month ago. I was stuck in traffic as you can see so I was seated a fair amount of time. But typically when out riding, if I am seated and am pretty light in the saddle and frequently stand or rise out of the saddle for smaller bumps.



    I currently have a post that I am not having problems with short of it being on the heavier side of things. But I may simply be to heavy for anything lighter at this point.

  11. #11
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    I'll agree with the guys who say RIDING STYLE.
    I bent a post on my first REAL mountain bike years ago, a good RACE FACE post.
    Over time my riding style developed, becoming more reactive, taking more weight on my feet and less on the seat when things get rough
    There are lots of situations where you unweight your saddle to deal with rocks,logs.ruts, hikers ect. Size and weight certainly shouldn't be an issue for you
    Last edited by scyule; 09-19-2010 at 08:16 AM.

  12. #12
    The need for singlespeed
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    You'll bend fewer posts on the 16t. =)

  13. #13
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    Is that you in the yellow? If so, you are hunched over way too much in IMO.

    I've had some issues with Easton posts, never with a Thomson straight. I run Thomson posts and stems on all my bikes, never had one issue. I'm 5'10" 170lbs.

  14. #14
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    Then I don't get it, if you are light on the seat, never seated on bumps, how do you bend it? You are just peddling along with no extra weight applied and the seat bends with 180# of pressure?
    Jesse
    '08 GF Montare
    '10 Rockhopper SS
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    02-10 SSGT of Marines
    (Most) always down for a ride in the Gville area

  15. #15
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    1SPD that looks like a nice trail . Good video but it looks more like a slow casual ride with friends rather than a "RACE".

  16. #16
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    that was painful watching you behind that one guy in red on the bike with reflectors.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1SPD
    First one was the stock EC30 Easton,
    You probably meant EA30. An "Easton EC30" is a carbon fork for road bikes.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


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  18. #18
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    Sorry, yes it was an alu so EA30.

    I know I am bent/hunched more than what most guys ride now days. I guess I am a bit old school in that regard. My seat is about 3" higher than my bars. I tend to ride with a fairly flat stem angle (parallel to the ground). Perhaps this is from my days of road racing and it simply feels more comfy to me. I feel awkward when I have my hands higher like most set ups of today.

    I will admit, I do ride in the saddle a fair amount (it's more efficient). So, I guess the little bumps are what are doing it.

    I know we were going slow there. It was horrible. They combined the juniors and the 34 and unders and started them 2 minutes ahead of us. We caught them and got stuck behind them. The majority of the race was this way. I was third for the entire race as the first two guys road away from us at the start. I caught up with them twice but lost them both times due to traffic. The worst part is that these guys would not get out of the way and our passing them had not impact on their placement in their class. In the end I think my 3rd place time was equal to their 5th place time and that was with them having a 2 minute head start so I had to be moving at some point.

    As for the reflectors, man, I saw all sorts of crap out there that day!

  19. #19
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    Yes, that was me in yellow btw. A buddy I met on here just happened to be racing and recorded the whole race. He downloaded this portion for me on youtube. I have the entire race though I got away from him at some point so there is quite a bit of footage that does not have me in it.

    I can get away with a straight post as long as I can slide the seat all the way back. It feels a little short for my legs if you will but I can deal with it. I think that might be the only way I can get away with a carbon or ti at this point. So far I have had no problems with my Ritchey WCS. Just as nice as the Thompson though I like the machine work on the Thompson more. I just don't like the design of the Thompson laid back post.

    On second though, the ti post I bent was a straight post and looks very similar to the Lynskey (the clamp looks almost identical) but the wall thickness is pretty thin. You can't slide the seat back very far with that clamp design either.

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