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Thread: School me on SS

  1. #1
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    School me on SS

    So I've deciced to pull my dad's old Peugeot (early 80's) road bike out of the garage and turn it into a SS commuter.

    What do I need to get to turn it into a SS.

    Ive been looking at different sites for parts but i'm lost with all the stuff thats out there.

    I've looked at kits, pieced together, ive even seen conversions on MTB/Road bikes where they just get a smaller chain and keep it on one pair of sprockets eliminating having to swap out sprockets.

    I'm getting back into riding and forgot the fundamentals of bikes. Chain sizes, etc...man I've gotta get back on the bandwagon and gather the facts.

  2. #2
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    You need to determine the following (pretty much all of this can be researched here) :

    The exact model you have, and where it was originally sold. Big difference between 70s and early 80s models being sold in France vs. exported to UK/US. There is some info on that here.

    Chainring BCD

    Front chainline

    Wheel size (before around '85 lots of imported euro bikes used 27" wheels, not 700c)
    - If not 700c, you may want to consider having a new wheelset built up. It would be
    easy enough to get a SS specific wheelset, you would have a broader range of
    tires available, etc. You would have to modify the brakes and/or their mounting
    points in order to do this.

    Rear hub make (is it the original, or a campy / shimano replacement?)
    -based on the above, determine how to remove the gear cluster and replace unused
    gears with spacers. I can think of at least one instance where it is actually going to be
    easier to just have a new rear wheel built.

    Then, consider the following:

    Run 3/32" chain on 3/32" chainring and sprocket.

    Use the formula: (rear hub spacing)/2 - (distance from sprocket to dropout) = front chainline to get your setup just right.

    Depending on what gearing you choose, get you chain the right length to place the wheel in the dropouts where you want it. You may need a half-link to do this. Definitely get a chain tool.

    Disassemble the entire bike until you cannot take anything else apart easily. Clean, lube, and take the opportunity to learn everything about the bike.

    Re-assemble. Leave off everything that doesn't serve a useful purpose.

    If you really want to see the advantages of SS, do it right. Remove all that extraneous stuff. Simpler, cleaner, lighter.

    Good luck! These old bikes were/are really good.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunset1123

    Wheel size (before around '85 lots of imported euro bikes used 27" wheels, not 700c)
    - If not 700c, you may want to consider having a new wheelset built up. It would be
    easy enough to get a SS specific wheelset, you would have a broader range of
    tires available, etc. You would have to modify the brakes and/or their mounting
    points in order to do this.

    Rear hub make (is it the original, or a campy / shimano replacement?)
    -based on the above, determine how to remove the gear cluster and replace unused
    gears with spacers. I can think of at least one instance where it is actually going to be
    easier to just have a new rear wheel built.

    .
    First off, Thanks for the useful info !

    1) Came with 27" rims/tires.Original still. Why should I look into switching over to 700c ?
    And when you say a SS specific wheelset, is there a difference between building a wheel to be SS as opposed to buying SS specific ?

    2) The rear hub is original Milardo? Mildrano ? forgot the name right now as i'm not near the bike....French.

    Am i going to run into problems swapping stuff over ? Should I just look for a normal vintage that will end up costing me less to be SS in the long run ????

    Thanks again!

  4. #4
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    Yeah... 27" wheels, with the Malliard hub. If it's an early one, it could be of the Heliocomatic type. No issues there, if you want to keep it original, but these parts are incompatible with modern replacements. I've never actually taken apart a Heliocomatic freehub, but I'm guessing you could just dissasemble the cassette and keep one sprocket and use spacers as necessary. The advantage of a modern freehub (shimano splined, for instance) is the ease by which you can get a replacement, and the widely available cogs and spacers.

    Add this to the fact that with a shimano freehub you do not need a cassette body at all, whereas with a Heliocomatic type, you will need to retain the cassette body due to the spiral shaped 'threads.'

    The primary reason for 700c, is again the widely available range of tires and rims. By all means, keep the 27" if you are after an authentic restoration, but be prepared to hunt around a bit more for parts as they wear out.

    If cost is the primary concern, then keep what you have if it works. It shouldn't be too difficult to SS it if the cassette is amenable to being modified.

  5. #5
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    Eh.

    I'll just restore this one (just clean it up, tune up) and start shopping for a vintage already setup for SS.

    I want this to be as smooth as possible. And not hurt my pocket too much.


    Thanks for the heads up!

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