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  1. #1
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    Running a Surly steel drivetrain? Happy?

    I'm looking to upgrade the stock alloy chainring and stamped steel cog on my Kona Unit. My main priorities are durability & reliability. And, of course, I don't want to spend more than I need.

    It looks like the Surly stainless ring and steel cog would be a good choice. I especially like the wide base on the cog to save my freehub body a little wear & tear, since the stock cog did it no favors.

    Does anyone run this setup? If so, are you happy with it?

    Thanks.

    Steve

  2. #2
    Rohloff
    Reputation: bsdc's Avatar
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    I'm running a Surly chainring and cog and it's working well. It should perform just as you want.

  3. #3
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    Yep same here, surly chainring and cog with a new 8spd kmc chain. Check ISAR's stuff if you want to add a little bling.

  4. #4
    Did I catch a niner+?
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    I run a 33T front chainring from Surly and it does quite well for the few rides I had on it. It replaced a 32t XT composite/steel ring. The rings are durable there is no question about that but they are heavier then most I have used/felt.
    Mr. Krabs: Is it true, Squidward? Is it hilarious?

  5. #5
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    I have a chainring. It seems to be lasting forever.

  6. #6
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    Running Surly 34T with a Surly 21T cog with a sram 850 or 870 chain. No problems I have gone thru several chains but same ring/cog.

  7. #7
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    I've run Surly chainring/cogs for many miles with zero issues. Good durability. Highly recommended. This season, I'm trying out ISAR's stuff.

  8. #8
    Drinking the Slick_Juice
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    if you have a 5 bolt crank arm you wont have a problem (i have this setup), if you have a 4 bolt crank arm you might have the infamous tacoed ring.
    "If women don't find handsome , they should at least find you handy."-Red Green

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by nuck_chorris
    if you have a 5 bolt crank arm you wont have a problem (i have this setup), if you have a 4 bolt crank arm you might have the infamous tacoed ring.
    I've only used a 4-bolt and have not had any issues. I've read where others have, but whether that's product or user fault, who knows. I think it makes sense to keep the 4-bolt chainrings to 33-32T.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by p nut
    I've only used a 4-bolt and have not had any issues. I've read where others have, but whether that's product or user fault, who knows. I think it makes sense to keep the 4-bolt chainrings to 33-32T.

    I'll be using mine with a 4-bolt, 104mm Shimano XT crank.

    My current gearing is 32/18. But, I'm moving to 33/18 with the Surly setup. I was considering 32/17. But, I'd rather have to buy an additional cog than another chainring if I want to make another jump to a harder gear. The 32t alloy chainring seemed to be fine. So, hopefully, a 33t stainless chainring will not be any weaker.

    Are the tacoed Surly chainring reports from hitting things (logs, rocks, etc.), or simply a matter of the chainring folding under heavy load? If the latter, are they being replaced under Surly's warranty?

    Steve

  11. #11
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    Both. You can just bend it right back but I scrapped mine after I folded it on the first ride. They're made of too soft of a stainless to be functional as a chainring.

  12. #12
    aka "SirLurkAlot"
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    I have been running 4 bolt surly chain rings (32) with surly cogs for years on both of my bikes. I have never bent one but I also don't beat on my equipment. I can't imagine that aluminum would fare any better.

    I haven't had any issues so ....

    I just ordered a 5 bolt for my new build because they just work.

  13. #13
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    I once bent a 36t Surly ring on a 4 bolt crank, but my current 110mm 5 bolt 36t Surly Stainless ring has been doing fine for over 2 years.
    Ride more!

  14. #14
    Fixed and single.
    Reputation: mordecai's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nuck_chorris
    if you have a 5 bolt crank arm you wont have a problem (i have this setup), if you have a 4 bolt crank arm you might have the infamous tacoed ring.
    +1. They are less tolerant of being dinged on rocks and logs(user error).
    "Those are some good humans."

  15. #15
    Teen Wolf
    Reputation: cr45h's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nuck_chorris
    if you have a 5 bolt crank arm you wont have a problem (i have this setup), if you have a 4 bolt crank arm you might have the infamous tacoed ring.

    ding... i'm not a big or powerful guy (5'8" 150lbs wet) and taco'd mine within a month or 2 of owning it. the cogs are great, i wouldn't buy another chainring from them though after the last one barely lasted.

  16. #16
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    I have the 32T cog and the thing is a tank. i cant really see that thing wearing out anytime soon!

  17. #17
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
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    I would not get a stainless ring. The yield strength of 300 series stainless (what Surly uses) is REALLY low, much lower than aluminum. This means it'll bend really easily.
    I tacoed one after a short period of time, and i didn't hit anything either. I was just climbing a hill. Before that happened, it would bend the teeth over 90 degrees on a regular occurance. I'm guessing the frame had a little flex, allowing the chain to jump around a bit under load and it probably caught a tooth the wrong way and bent.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
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    so just get a bash

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