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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Replaced chain too late. Do I have to replace my cog and chainring as well?

    I've been a little neglectful with checking my chain wear and finally got to it this winter. The chain had been on for 2 seasons and had about 800 miles on it. It was cooked. I put on a PC-1 because it was cheap and headed out for my 1st ride this week. Soft pedalling felt fine but when I stood to climb it felt/sounded like alot of grinding was going on with my drive train. I didn't drop a chain and the tension was good. The cog(surly) and chainring didn't look to be excessively worn. My previous chain was an 8 speed kmc. Is this just a PC-1 thing? Should i just ride until it stretches quiet? Thoughts?

  2. #2
    Retro Grouch
    Reputation: aka brad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RMcjd
    I've been a little neglectful with checking my chain wear and finally got to it this winter. The chain had been on for 2 seasons and had about 800 miles on it. It was cooked. I put on a PC-1 because it was cheap and headed out for my 1st ride this week. Soft pedalling felt fine but when I stood to climb it felt/sounded like alot of grinding was going on with my drive train. I didn't drop a chain and the tension was good. The cog(surly) and chainring didn't look to be excessively worn. My previous chain was an 8 speed kmc. Is this just a PC-1 thing? Should i just ride until it stretches quiet? Thoughts?
    A little grinding is natural even if you replaced the chain earlier; any stretching of the chain at all will change the profile of the teeth so your new chain will need to seat itself by grinding a new profile. What you want to be aware of is any snapping noises, which is usually the result of "shark finning". A Dremal tool can be used to even out the teeth, which will make the snapping stop, but you will need to decide if you want to get new drivetrain parts or not.
    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the reply. After an hour, it was a little quieter. No popping noises to be heard. I think i'll replace the chainring and chain next time. Would you recommend changing the cog as well?

  4. #4
    backwoods and backwards
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    I run pretty cheap/durable stuff so changing out the whole drivetrain at the same time makes good sence. LX type 26t ring= $12, surly 14t cog=$20 XT chain= $30.

    If you run bling bling parts, then shame's on you for not taking better care, but keep in mind that running a new chain on worn parts forces the chain to fit the same way your old blown-up chain did. Yes the dremmel will work... sometimes just advancing the chainring 90degrees on the crank ( or even flipping it over) can buy some time. None of the tricks come close to the quality of just throwing down for the new parts. peace K.
    MERCY! MERCY! MERCY!

  5. #5
    Retro Grouch
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    Quote Originally Posted by RMcjd
    Thanks for the reply. After an hour, it was a little quieter. No popping noises to be heard. I think i'll replace the chainring and chain next time. Would you recommend changing the cog as well?
    Steel cogs last a long time, usually longer that a chainring. You'll just have to eyeball the cog and as long as the tooth profile looks good, stay with it. Here is an old Suntour 1/8" fixed cog I wore out; you can see that sharkfins..
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Replaced chain too late. Do I have to replace my cog and chainring as well?-cog.jpg  

    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

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