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  1. #1
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    Pay now, pay later?

    Since having decided that I need to get a SS after my first year of riding trails, and having read so many accounts of how often the other bike(s) takes a backseat after this happens I think I should probably have one I really like and am proud of.

    Just trying to do the math the last 4-5 weeks on what I need to save. Do I get a complete bike and then upgrade? Say a Redline and then 7 or 8 hundred in new stuff like wheelsets, bar, seat, cranks, and brakes. How about a Kona and then almost as much?

    Do I keep saving and looking for a package that's closer and then personalize? Guess the money is going to get spent one way or the other, huh?

  2. #2
    AZ
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    It is rarely cheaper to buy a bike and then upgrade everything.

  3. #3
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    Look for a slightly used one, that could save you a few bucks.
    Pedal Dammit!

  4. #4
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    Either a used one closer to what you want or buy it all in pieces. There is an awesome deal going on the Vassago Jabberwocky frame right now at $366 @ hucknroll. Then again you can just buy a complete, start riding it, realize how much more fun it is and sell your geared bike. Use the funds from that to upgrade all your parts.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS View Post
    It is rarely cheaper to buy a bike and then upgrade everything.
    This is true. I'd recommend buying a less-expensive used singlespeed perhaps off craigslist, ride that thing w/out worrying about upgrades, and save up for the nicer bike while you're riding the cheaper one. You could also occasionally upgrade the cheaper one (say, with a nice wheelset), and then transfer the upgrade(s) to the newer/nicer bike you get down the road.

  6. #6
    Oaktown Honkey on Strava
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    Agree, buy complete bike now

    I like 29er single speed to go along with my 26 inch full suspension gear bike. This combo doubles the number of trails in the USA. 2 totally different styles of riding. $20 temporary fix by using tensioner/cog on current bike?

  7. #7
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    Have you done the "don't shift" technique on your current ride? Or can you convert your current bike? Might give you some time to save up for a good ride.

  8. #8
    Oaktown Honkey on Strava
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    That is funny! don't shift.

    I did this once. I had so much fun I pretty much migrated to single speed 80%. After summer dusty 2 hr ride on my gear bike, the 32 front and 18 rear on 26er was clean/oily and the rest of the bike looked like a dust ghost. awesome sight. bought 2 s.s. in the last 2 yrs. I 2nd the "don't shift". It takes Vulcan like concentration to NOT shift for a few hrs.

  9. #9
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    Hey Glynn, I just remembered that I posted in this other post you started. By all means get an SS!!

    Pondering a switch to SS

    And I agree with AZ.MTNS, that you will spend more money upgrading a complete bike.

  10. #10
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    Yeah, I ride without shifting pretty much all the time now. I go 44/12 when I do my gravel road ride and 32/18 on the trail. Daylight savings time has shot all but my weekend rides and lately the holidays have taken those.

    I read here that riding a geared bike without shifting isn't the same as SS and I'm sure that's true. Thinking about putting the geared bike up for sale to speed up the cash gathering process, just hate not to have a bike and also think I might wish I still had it later for some reason. Have done that with some possessions before.

    If I start with a 3 to 4 hundred dollar frame and build it on paper I usually wind up in the 1500.00+ range. If I start with a Kona at 8 or 9 hundred and change hubs, bars, saddle, whatnot, I can keep it below that initially and have a bike to ride while doing it.

    Not much of a plan right now but to save and keep watching for something similar to the Kona, Vassago, built or not that they want to sell to fund their new project.

    Thanks all for your time and links,
    Glynn

  11. #11
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    I've had several "glitzy" SS's, however the ones I had the most fun on were the stock ones that I owned. Monocog Flight and GT Peace 9r! If I ever have a bike custom built the geometry will likely be very similar to the GT's.

  12. #12
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    If you are new to the singlespeed world either go cheap or buy something that can convert to geared. You don't want to end up being one of those guys that hates riding singlespeed and is stuck taking a bath after spending mucho $$ on a baller singlespeed.

    On that note...I've had my $500 Monocog for almost four years now and love it. Sure it is heavy, the components aren't the greatest, and I've thrown a few hundred into it in brakes/drivetrain but I absolutely love this bike. You don't have to spend a ton of cash to have a ton of fun.
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