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  1. #1
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    Need some assistance

    Okay, first post here so be easy on me.

    I have a Trek 4 series frame and have hopes of turning it into a SS mtb. My question is, is it possible to do it on this frame? Someone told me that it is not possible to convert this frame into a SS. If it is possible, can someone please tell me what I would need for the hub and chain, etc that I would need to use.



    As of right now, it is purely a bare frame. I need to get everything to complete this build. I really want to build this bike up myself. Any help is appreciated.


    I have been researching this like mad and have come to a point where I am stuck. The FAQ page here is very informative btw.

  2. #2
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    You have a couple of options actually. But in sort, yes, you could convert it.

    1. You can buy a conversion kit that will normally come with a rear cog, spacers, and a tensioner pulley to help keep the chain tension where it needs to be.

    2. You could buy an eccentric rear hub (say a White Industries Eno eccentric-www.whiteindustries.com) and a freewheel for it.

    Don't think you can run an eccentric bb with this frame though due to bb sizing of frame.

  3. #3
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    Where can I find the conversion kit?

    Is this a stupid venture? I was hoping to build a nice budget SS since I already had a frame handy.

  4. #4
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    I know that performance has a kit that is fairly cheap but remember that you get what you pay for. I know that Surly also makes the rear cog/spacers and you can also find them on ebay if you do a search while under mountain bike parts for "single speed" I am sure you can also do a search on here for ss conversion and will find something as well.

    You can do this on a budget. That is the whole beauty of it all.

  5. #5
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    a COG , SPACERS and a TENSIONER would be very inexpensive.

    From my own experience with my FIRST SS, I would advise you to either use a 2-pulley tensioner like a MELVIN (http://www.paulcomp.com/melvin.html) or use an old deraileur as a tensioner ......... lots of us have had problems with insufficient chain wrap/ chain slippage issues when using cheap, down-pull tensioners

  6. #6
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    Man, I am confusing the hell out of myself with this stuff.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big_Hidu
    Man, I am confusing the hell out of myself with this stuff.
    Take a look at the <a href="http://www.mtbr.com/ssfaqcrx.aspx"> FAQ </a>. You are going to need a way to tension your chain. The cheapist, and one of the best ways is to use an old derailleur, ala the FAQ:

    There are a couple ways to set up an old derailleur as a tensioner.

    The 1st method is to totally remove the cable, then adjust the inner & outer set screws to set the derailleur in a fixed position.

    The 2nd method is to insert a short section of old cable into the derailleur's barrel adjuster from the rear (so the cable end rests in the adjuster). The normal cable fixing bolt is used to lock the cable in place. The barrel adjuster can then be used to fine-tune the chainline.


    Once you get the chain tension thing worked out, you'll need to deal with the rear wheel.

    It's all in the FAQ.

    Brad
    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

  8. #8
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    Thanks for your help so far guys.

    aka brad, I have been reading the FAQ as if it were the bible, ha. I am still iffy on quite a few things. I am trying my best to learn everything about SS bikes.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big_Hidu
    Thanks for your help so far guys.

    aka brad, I have been reading the FAQ as if it were the bible, ha. I am still iffy on quite a few things. I am trying my best to learn everything about SS bikes.
    Okay, lets look at tensioners. Most the tensioners attach to your derailleur hanger. The first and most common is spring loaded, then you have non-spring loaded and dual pulley. Most of these push the chain down and that can be problematic on some drivetrains. Because the tensioner is attached so close to the rear cog, pushing the chain down actually reduces the amount of teeth the chain comes in contact with; this can cause the chain tension to overcome the tensioner and skip teeth while pedaling up hill. The answer is to use a tensioner the pushes the chain up. Surly is the only spring loaded tensioner that includes a second push up spring for that purpose. Most tensioners require you shorten the chain as much as possible before using the tensioner and are not designed to accommodate more than one cog. If you want to have several different size cogs available (referred to as a dinglespeed), you will need to use a dual pulley tensioner or a derailleur. Finally, one option not shown is the <a href="http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=408510&highlight=yess+etr-b"> Yess ETR-B </a>which monogod spent some time evaluating.

    Does this clear things up a bit?
    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

  10. #10
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    I don't know if it is worth it. A fork, headset, seatpost clamp, tires, tubes, wheels, brakes, saddle... You could probably nab a monocog for that money, or find a used mtb on craigslist and strip it down.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by aka brad
    Okay, lets look at tensioners. Most the tensioners attach to your derailleur hanger. The first and most common is spring loaded, then you have non-spring loaded and dual pulley. Most of these push the chain down and that can be problematic on some drivetrains. Because the tensioner is attached so close to the rear cog, pushing the chain down actually reduces the amount of teeth the chain comes in contact with; this can cause the chain tension to overcome the tensioner and skip teeth while pedaling up hill. The answer is to use a tensioner the pushes the chain up. Surly is the only spring loaded tensioner that includes a second push up spring for that purpose. Most tensioners require you shorten the chain as much as possible before using the tensioner and are not designed to accommodate more than one cog. If you want to have several different size cogs available (referred to as a dinglespeed), you will need to use a dual pulley tensioner or a derailleur. Finally, one option not shown is the <a href="http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=408510&highlight=yess+etr-b"> Yess ETR-B </a>which monogod spent some time evaluating.

    Does this clear things up a bit?
    Thank you very much, that was extremely helpful. I just learned the gearing ratios and such and just need to figure out what I feel like riding.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by umarth
    I don't know if it is worth it. A fork, headset, seatpost clamp, tires, tubes, wheels, brakes, saddle... You could probably nab a monocog for that money, or find a used mtb on craigslist and strip it down.
    You think I should sell the frame and put it towards a factory SS mtb? The more I research, the more it does seems impossible (for me at least).

    I am broke as hell and in college. Really wanted a decent;y priced project.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big_Hidu
    You think I should sell the frame and put it towards a factory SS mtb? The more I research, the more it does seems impossible (for me at least).

    I am broke as hell and in college. Really wanted a decent;y priced project.
    It is a tough call. If you are willing to sit on a project you can build it up cheap and well. But you have to know equipment. I'm in school too, and culmination of my efforts is a 650b'ed Monocog. Nothing fancy, and I've bought things, pulled a part and then turned them. I have about 300 in my bike and I feel like that is minimal...

    The flip side is that I spent the entire of last summer on an 89 Rockhopper. And it was great. You could find something similar for 100 bucks and get it ready to ride SS for another 50 and it would do you well...

    It will all hinge on your mechanical know-how and decision making.

  14. #14
    one chain loop
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    buy a complete bike, it will be cheaper and less hassle. you wont be getting much from that frame either, if you can find a buyer who is looking for an XL frame, 30 bucks the most. maybe save the cranks for your next project.
    everything sucks but my vacuum cleaner.

  15. #15
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    Yeah, I think I am just going to scrap this project. It seems too much hassle at the moment. I am moving soon anyway, no use trying to build this frame up.

    I think though that I will convert my current mtb to a single speed. It's an '09 Giant Boulder. It's a complete bike, so that's a plus!

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