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  1. #1
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    The monster chain!

    So much power!

    So many miles!

    Can any bicycle chain handle the abuse?

    Enter the MONSTER chain!

    Last edited by febikes; 11-04-2012 at 12:35 PM.
    Mark Farnsworth, Raleigh, NC
    http://farnsworthbikes.com

  2. #2
    High Gravity Haze
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    D.I.D. 420 chain?

  3. #3
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    Actually it is an HKK motorcycle chain.
    HKK Chain
    Mark Farnsworth, Raleigh, NC
    http://farnsworthbikes.com

  4. #4
    High Gravity Haze
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    What size of chain? HKK 25? I've thought about doing this before. 100 mi on my current SS chain and stretch is already an issue.

  5. #5
    CB2
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    Jam Econo
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    I'm glad I'm too weak to merit a motorcycle chain.

  6. #6
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    It is going to destroy your chainring and cog.

  7. #7
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    From what I understand, motorcycle rings were used instead of normal bike rings. Take a look at the ring in the picture, that's gotta be 3/16" or maybe even 1/4" thick ring.

  8. #8
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    I bet that's thing adds a little weight

  9. #9
    Single Speed Junkie
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    Frame weight 4.8#
    Chain 6.2#
    Chain ring and cog 1.1#
    30,000 mile on the drive train and no signs of wear priceless

  10. #10
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    I understand the reasoning and the convenience... but i couldnt bare to add that much weight to my bike and im no weight weenie. My SS weighs like 23 lbs.

  11. #11
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    i would consider this for my commuter bike. would be nice to not have to worry about the chain at all. and since im already hauling all my crap anyways whats a few extra lbs right.

  12. #12
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    Yes, I ride 12 miles to work most days so it's 24 miles total and then on the weekends plus I tend to go long and like the idea of setting this up and forgetting it. My route has a mix of on and off road and is sometimes sloppy in the winter plus I rarely clean the bike so the chain gets a fair bit of abuse.

    It is not light. I did not weigh the parts but I imagine they are fairly heavy. My race bike setup will be generally be lighter so for me I don't really mind training on a heavier bike.

    The idea came from my friend Terry and he did all the fabrication work for the parts. Getting better chain wear will be nice but the big reason I wanted to do this was that it looks totally BAD ASS in that monster truck way. The chain rides really nice as well and I swear the entire drive train feels smoother and power delivery seems absolutely rigid. No joke, a new chain with proper tension always feels great compared to my worn setup but this one feels extra smooth. It could be placebo but so far I like it.
    Mark Farnsworth, Raleigh, NC
    http://farnsworthbikes.com

  13. #13
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    Let's see the cog

  14. #14
    Always in the wrong gear
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    If it's an I ring style chain it will last longer also.

    It looks cool but I couldn't push that much weight.

  15. #15
    one chain loop
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    you want strong? just do like Erik Noren does best..

    Last edited by fishcreek; 11-03-2012 at 07:20 PM.
    everything sucks but my vacuum cleaner.

  16. #16
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    The cog is based on motorcycle 22 tooth sprocket. The ring is 36 tooth so I have my normal ratio.
    Mark Farnsworth, Raleigh, NC
    http://farnsworthbikes.com

  17. #17
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    I like it. Got somemore pics?
    Ride more!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by asphaltdude View Post
    I like it. Got somemore pics?
    The size of the chain is such that it is hard to grasp the scale of it unless you have seen motorcycle chains compared to a bicycle chain.


    I have a lot of pictures on my blog.
    Mark Farnsworth, Raleigh, NC
    http://farnsworthbikes.com

  19. #19
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    And I thought my KMC Z410HD was beefy...

  20. #20
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    I think the idea is really ****ing dumb, but I love seeing it. Good work! For added bonus, you are going to trigger any light you stop at.

  21. #21
    Poacher
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    Nice post!

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by umarth View Post
    I think the idea is really ****ing dumb, but I love seeing it.
    No, THIS is dumb (but cool).
    That monster chain setup is just cool.

    BTW, febikes, how did you attach the cog to the hub body? Did you machine splines in the cog, or did you add some splined thingy to the cog?
    Last edited by asphaltdude; 11-09-2012 at 04:27 AM.
    Ride more!

  23. #23
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    My friend Terry fabricated all the parts.

    For the cog he took two normal shimono cogs and attached them to each side of the motorcycle cog so the rear cog is supported by bars that span the two shimono cogs and pass through the motorcycle cog.
    Mark Farnsworth, Raleigh, NC
    http://farnsworthbikes.com

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