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  1. #1
    rocky iv style
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    New question here. mid-90's trek dropouts...

    my brother recently moved from chicago to phoenix and decided that instead of taking his 1995(?) trek 800 with him he would leave it with me and buy something else instead of transporting a "worthless" bike.
    i got bored. so i'm restoring it. i just started removing the paint and got looking at the dropouts as i plan to ss it. it seems to have forward facing, almost horizontal dropouts. i plan to ss it and give it back to him as a commuter.
    is anyone familiar with these dropouts, do i need a singulator or is there enough dropout to tension the chain, if he only uses it to commute will he have a problem with the wheel slipping forward, and if so how do i fix that problem?
    sorry no pics, can't do 'em at work.
    thanks
    Last edited by ShockStar; 04-16-2004 at 11:00 AM. Reason: typing issues

  2. #2
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShockStar
    my brother recently moved from chicago to phoenix and decided that instead of taking his 1995(?) trek 800 with him he would leave it with me and buy something else instead of transporting a "worthless" bike.
    i got bored. so i'm restoring it. i just started removing the paint and got looking at the dropouts as i plan to ss it. it seems to have forward facing, almost horizontal dropouts. i plan to ss it and give it back to him as a commuter.
    is anyone familiar with these dropouts, do i need a singulator or is there enough dropout to tension the chain, if he only uses it to commute will he have a problem with the wheel slipping forward, and if so how do i fix that problem?
    sorry no pics, can't do 'em at work.
    thanks
    From the sounds of it, it seems like you would have enough room to play with the tension, thus eliminating the need for a tensioner. Since it's an earlier bike, the quick release is probably steel so you can crank down hard on the QR so as to keep the wheel in place.
    A good friend will come bail you out of jail.
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  3. #3
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    You might be able to get away with cranking down on the QR, but for safety's sake you probably want to use a bolt-on hub.
    --- FeelsGood

  4. #4
    all hail der Fuhrer Bush
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    answers

    use a hub with serrated steel locknut faces, and a quick release skewer with steel end faces and the wheel will not slip. that's how it was speced originally when it was a gearie bike, no reason subtracting cogs would cause it to slip.
    you should be able to tension the chain, it's ok if the axle is fully forward if necessary, somethere along the length of the dropout the chain should be tight enough. probably can't run a flipflop hub with two different size cogs, however.

  5. #5
    paintbucket
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    That's probably a semi-vertical dropout. You can see pictures here.

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/singlespeed.html#vertical
    When the going gets weird its bedtime.

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