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  1. #1
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    micro drives and longevity

    I'm making a chainring and cog set for my friend's bike which is to be showcased at the SS World Championships this year. I'm considering making a micro drive for him just to be a little different. His ratio would typically be a 32/20 for this race, but a 24/15 would be the exact same ratio and a buttload smaller/lighter. Now my question is, has anyone noticed a huge decrease in longevity with this size of drivetrain? I'm expecting some premature wear, but i dont want to go that route if it's going to be alot worse. He's running a 3/32" chain and it will be on a Siren 29er with eno cranks.

  2. #2
    Beware the Blackbuck!
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    Look through the new singlespeed thread for the 14 lbs all ti bike... He's got 24/12 on there or something, and every time his bike gets posted people point out all the things that are going to break if he looks at it wrong (micro drive, wheelset). He claims that he rides the crap out of it, and it doesn't really reduce the lifespan all that much.

    Try searching for "sweetwings," or I think the poster's handle is "mattcock" or something like that.

    Edit: Nevermind, here's the thread:

    My NEW WW Bike!!! YEAH!!

    So it was "mattkock," close enough... I don't know for certain if that's the thread where he mentions the lifespan not being too bad, but it's a starting point (or someone to PM.)
    Last edited by ShadowsCast; 08-18-2009 at 07:22 PM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ISuckAtRiding
    His ratio would typically be a 32/20 for this race, but a 24/15 would be the exact same ratio and a buttload smaller/lighter
    Interesting. Can you detail what exactly "buttload" is in grams? (no seriously)

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wish I Were Riding
    Interesting. Can you detail what exactly "buttload" is in grams? (no seriously)

    a buttload is aprox 119.65g
    Quote Originally Posted by thefuzzbl
    aluminium has a tendency to fail when you need it most. i.e. you end up with a bad day.

  5. #5
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    thanks for the replies guys. I'm not sure quite yet what the weight difference will be with my setup, but i'm sure it will be fairly signifigant.

  6. #6
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by scooter916
    a buttload is aprox 119.65g
    Guess you haven't seen my wife.

  8. #8
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    Umm... I think this has been covered. The weight savings do not make up for the deficiency in chain/cog engagement or drivetrain smoothness. Longevity isn't an issue if setting up that way for a race, but I'd hate to be cranking up a hill while skipping the chain over the cogs... or hearing that lovely snap/crack sound that the drivetrain makes while under the kind of tension a setup like this would require.

  9. #9
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    If he only expects to use it for a couple races and use a regular drivetrain for all the riding inbetween, then I don't see why not. It probably wouldn't wear fast enough to fail during one or a few races.

    36x20 has been a revelation in smoothness for me. Damn the weight, it feels good. But I understand how those racer boys are

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