Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    7

    information overload

    you guys do a great job of helping anyone who has a question!!! so much so, that i have been taking in so much information, i have succeeded in completely confusing myself. when i started out, my original question was "i have a 1995 or so Diamondback Sorrento and want to convert it to a fixed gear bike. what is easiest way to accomplish this?"

    i need to replace EVERYTHING on this bike except the fork, handlebar and frame. i have already removed the derailer, brakes, etc. Not looking for the cheapest solution, just the easiest. hope question makes sense!! thanks guys.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    540
    Wow... it could definitely wind up being easier, simpler, and cheaper to just buy a new fixie than trying to convert the Diamondback. Sentimental value?

    The biggest obstacle is going to be finding a 26" fixed wheelset. You'll need to have one built around a fixed hub or use a newer mountain wheelset with disc hubs and a bolt-on cog like a TomiCog. A google search may reveal some pre-built 26" fixed wheels, make sure you check the dropout spacing.

    Keep in mind that the bottom bracket spindle length will most likely need to be different in either case, narrower for the fixed hubset, and wider for the disc cog setup.

    The easiest solution, if $ is not an issue, would be to go with a wheelset built around White industries ENO hubs, which will give you a 47.5mm chainline, and you can then use the WI crankset which will match perfectly.

    Alternatively, use a square taper crankset with the appropriate BB spindle length. For example, I used a Sugino XD-2 crank with a 113mm bottom bracket to give me a 47.5mm chainline.

    If you have semi-horizontal dropouts on that frame, you are golden. May want to look into axles with nuts instead of quick releases though. If they are vertical, then you need some way to tension the chain, which for a fixed gear, means going with the ENO eccentric.

    If you are going to ride it offroad, you might consider putting on a decent V brake on the front, or if you are getting a disc compatible fork, a fixie with a front disc brake is a GOOD thing.
    For me, riding bikes is not a hobby, it is a way of life.
    http://natureofmtness.blogspot.com

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    2,959
    does that bike have a derailleur hanger built onto the dropout or just a slot?

    this will work with a normal track hub:

    because it allows some movement of the axle to tighten the chain.

    this will not:

    because there is only one position for the axle to be, so unless you find a "magic gear" ratio that fits the chainstay of the bike perfectly without a chain tensioner, it won't work. you cannot put a bolt-on chain tensioner on a bike with dropouts like this for a fixed-gear setup, that only works on a standard single-speed (coasting, not fixed) setup.

    this is a 26" bike, do you plan to put 700c wheels on it? they will probably fit, in case you were wondering. the problem will be tensioning the chain. you can built a wheel with a White Industries Eno hub, the one with track hub type threading on one side and 135mm spacing, or get a Forward Components Eccentric Bottom Bracket. either of those will be rather expensive for making a fixie out of such an old, inappropriate bike.

    let us know how much you are willing to spend on this.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    2,959
    I just read post #2 and yes, a disc hub run "backwards" with a Tomicog (look those up) would work, but there's still the problem of chain tension.

    does the crank have three rings all bolted together with bolts or are they all riveted together? or are you just getting new cranks? if they have chainring bolts, you can take the rings off and replace them with one single-speed ring.

    all that said, I agree that buying an entry-level fixie would probably be cheaper, easier, and work a lot better.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    540
    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle
    this is a 26" bike, do you plan to put 700c wheels on it? they will probably fit, in case you were wondering.
    And the bike would probably handle like crap as well. Bottom bracket ends up being too high, and the trail numbers go through the roof because the fork doesn't have enough offset for the larger wheel size. Result is a tippy bike with lots of wheel flop.

    Just FYI.
    For me, riding bikes is not a hobby, it is a way of life.
    http://natureofmtness.blogspot.com

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    2,959
    true, and getting a front brake of any sort of front brake to work will be a royal pain in the butt.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by sunset1123
    Wow... it could definitely wind up being easier, simpler, and cheaper to just buy a new fixie than trying to convert the Diamondback. Sentimental value?

    The biggest obstacle is going to be finding a 26" fixed wheelset. You'll need to have one built around a fixed hub or use a newer mountain wheelset with disc hubs and a bolt-on cog like a TomiCog. A google search may reveal some pre-built 26" fixed wheels, make sure you check the dropout spacing.

    Keep in mind that the bottom bracket spindle length will most likely need to be different in either case, narrower for the fixed hubset, and wider for the disc cog setup.

    The easiest solution, if $ is not an issue, would be to go with a wheelset built around White industries ENO hubs, which will give you a 47.5mm chainline, and you can then use the WI crankset which will match perfectly.

    Alternatively, use a square taper crankset with the appropriate BB spindle length. For example, I used a Sugino XD-2 crank with a 113mm bottom bracket to give me a 47.5mm chainline.

    If you have semi-horizontal dropouts on that frame, you are golden. May want to look into axles with nuts instead of quick releases though. If they are vertical, then you need some way to tension the chain, which for a fixed gear, means going with the ENO eccentric.

    If you are going to ride it offroad, you might consider putting on a decent V brake on the front, or if you are getting a disc compatible fork, a fixie with a front disc brake is a GOOD thing.
    definitely a little sentimental value!!! after reading suggestions from other members on this site, i recently bought a specialized hardrock sport disc 29. and i love it. but i was hoping to turn my first mtb into a bike i could ride around the neighborhood and on trails with my son. sounds like i will either be riding my new bike or a different new bike!!! lol. thanks for the input to all who responded. makes it alot easier to make a decision, when knowledgeable people are so willing to help!!!

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SeaBass_'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,397
    Are you confusing fixed gear with singlespeed?????

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by SeaBass_
    Are you confusing fixed gear with singlespeed?????
    well, not from the definition of the two. i know you can't coast with fixed gear. however, i may have been incorrect in assuming that it would be easier to switch to fixed gear vs singlespeed.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    29
    If your current wheel has a Shimano freehub, you can get one of these with a track cog and lockring. Probably cheaper than a new wheel. These other guys are right about tensioners though. You CANNOT use one with a fixed gear.
    "She may not look like much but she's got it where it counts kid. I've made a lot of special modifications myself."

  11. #11
    ilmfat
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    858
    SS conversion is way easier and cheaper. fixed is almost impossible, and alot more expensive.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by ilmfat
    SS conversion is way easier and cheaper. fixed is almost impossible, and alot more expensive.
    lol. well like i said i got pretty confused!!! i am not against the SS conversion. would love to make use of the bike if possible. i will check to see if it has the Shimano free hub as suggested above.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    2,959
    but if you put a Surly Fixxer on it, you still won't be able to tension the chain for it to work. a single-speed conversion would be easy and there is tons and tons of info about that in the SS FAQ link on the main page of this sub-forum. making it into a fixed-gear conversion will be almost impossible or at least cost prohibitive and foolhardy.

    your bike most likely has a shimano freehub because the original had 11-28 cassette, and and Altus hub. http://bikepedia.com/QuickBike/BikeS...ento&Type=bike putting a single-speed cog and some spacers and tensioning it with a Surly Singleator or a DMR Tesnion Seeker on it would be easy.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    79
    Easiest eh? Bring to the LBS and tell them you want it convert to a SS. No information overload just pay the cash.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: fiddlr40's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    299
    If you have vertical dropouts, a White ENO hub will work for chain tensioning, and you can get it flip-flop to run fixed/free. Not the easiest or cheapest, but it is possible.


  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    7
    thanks for all the help guys!! i do have the shimano free hub, so i am going to convert it to a SS and see how that goes. i agree taking it to the LBS would be the easiest, but i wanna have a little ownership of the job. lol. just to make sure i got it right, going with SS means i don't need to worry about the type of dropout. Correct? Thanks again!!

  17. #17
    Bro
    Bro is offline
    Where I do my thinking
    Reputation: Bro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    4,287
    Quote Originally Posted by itzgotti
    thanks for all the help guys!! i do have the shimano free hub, so i am going to convert it to a SS and see how that goes. i agree taking it to the LBS would be the easiest, but i wanna have a little ownership of the job. lol. just to make sure i got it right, going with SS means i don't need to worry about the type of dropout. Correct? Thanks again!!
    Well, you still need to tension the chain. And that depends on the type of dropouts you have. It's simple either way, but still. With horizontal/semi-horizontal dropouts you can tension the chain simply by moving the wheel, but if you have vertical dropouts you'll need some other tensioner. Eccentric bottom bracket, Singleator, etc etc and et cetera.
    I've made some bad decisions like taking the gears off my bike. So here's the warning: Do not as I say, nor as I do.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •