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  1. #1
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    Bonking ... not feelin' well I think I made a bad decision going ss.

    I started a thread a few weeks back maybe longer explaining what I was looking to do which was convert my geared bike into a ss. Everyone here gave me great advice and good suggestions and I think I have accomplished what the bike should look like with the chain and tension. I took my bike to another bike shop where they fixed the chain tension to where it should be but the only thing now is I think I might need a bigger chain ring so I feel more power. It feels like it's too easy to pedal. Another thing that crossed my mind was doing away with the ss and just getting an alphine 8. If I keep playing around with the cogs and chainset, and chain tension, I might never be satisfied.

  2. #2
    The need for singlespeed
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    What universe do we live in where this guy has more rep power than me?

  3. #3
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    Give it time, and you will end up with a ratio that works for you 90% of the time. I always have a 34 ring and change between a 16 and 18 cog depending on trail/fitness/conditions. Since you mentioned you have a tensioner, you might consider a dingle setup for a while- easy to do with a tensioner.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by bwheelin View Post
    they fixed the chain tension to where it should be
    Glad to hear you got it straightened out!

    Quote Originally Posted by bwheelin View Post
    the only thing now is I think I might need a bigger chain ring so I feel more power. It feels like it's too easy to pedal.
    As I think it was explained in the other thread, switching cogs is both easier and cheaper than switching chainrings.


    Quote Originally Posted by bwheelin View Post
    If I keep playing around with the cogs and chainset, and chain tension, I might never be satisfied.
    You'll eventually find the right gear combination for your riding style and terrain; but keep in mind that on a singlespeed, you'll be in the "wrong" gear a lot of the time, and you have to compensate with your legs -- you'll spin on the downhills and mash on the climbs -- that's just the nature of the beast. It takes some getting used to, but is ultimately quite satisfying, IMO. Don't throw in the towel on SSing until you give it a fighting chance to win you over.

  5. #5
    fresh fish in stock...... SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by zaskaranddriver View Post
    What universe do we live in where this guy has more rep power than me?
    i'll give you some *luv*

    +rep
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  6. #6
    I like mud
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    Hi bwheelin. I followed your posts during your conversion as I was converting at the same time.

    First of all, good for you for making this leap of faith - because that's what is. It's hard to imagine that going ss is in any way beneficial.

    But I just did it and I just "got it". I couldn't be happier. I blast past others up hills spinning in granny (usually). And I suck at hills. But now with my ss bike hills are where I excel.

    You got off to a rough start, and now it seems that your gearing might be off. Me, I just took a guess on the gearing. I am on 32:18 and just bought a 16 to see how that feels.

    Do the same. Test a few cogs out. Now that your bike is set up you should be able to change the cog yourself and just experiment.

    Don't give up now! Not after all this. Give it a chance and I think you will be glad you did!
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  7. #7
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    Going SS....not that big of a deal....seriously

  8. #8
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    What is your gearing right now? What kind of terrain do you generally ride? It sounds like you'd like a taller gear, and your thinking is correct that a larger chainring will do it. Changing the cog is a lot cheaper, and easier than swapping chainrings.

    I have some stamped steel single speed cogs sitting around. If you can tell me what you're running right now I may have a higher gear I could send you. It doesn't get cheaper than that. Also, since you have a tensioner it was mentioned that you could run a dingle, and since you have a cassette hub it's super easy to just add another cog with your ideal chainline splitting the difference between the two.

  9. #9
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    Ehh......Just GTFO.

    And I mean that in a Loving-Father-with-a-35-year-old-son-still-living-in-the-basement kind of way.

  10. #10
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    This is why I learn to do things on my own. There is almost nothing on a bike a competent adult shouldn't be able to handle with the right tools.
    All of the true things I'm about to tell you are shameless lies.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by False View Post
    This is why I learn to do things on my own. There is almost nothing on a bike a competent adult shouldn't be able to handle with the right tools.
    agreed.

  12. #12
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    i'm going to stick with it and play along with an 18 cog when i get a chance.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by p nut View Post
    Ehh......Just GTFO.

    And I mean that in a Loving-Father-with-a-35-year-old-son-still-living-in-the-basement kind of way.
    hey thanks for chiming in. have a nice day!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patterson View Post
    Hi bwheelin. I followed your posts during your conversion as I was converting at the same time.

    First of all, good for you for making this leap of faith - because that's what is. It's hard to imagine that going ss is in any way beneficial.

    But I just did it and I just "got it". I couldn't be happier. I blast past others up hills spinning in granny (usually). And I suck at hills. But now with my ss bike hills are where I excel.

    You got off to a rough start, and now it seems that your gearing might be off. Me, I just took a guess on the gearing. I am on 32:18 and just bought a 16 to see how that feels.

    Do the same. Test a few cogs out. Now that your bike is set up you should be able to change the cog yourself and just experiment.

    Don't give up now! Not after all this. Give it a chance and I think you will be glad you did!
    sounds good and thanks for the suggestions.

  15. #15
    President of the Internet
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    IMO, there is no "perfect gear." You can get BMX cogs for like $5. I'm more into running a smaller gear in back so I can ride faster. Have to push up some steep climbs tho
    Sometimes you eat the trail, sometimes the trail eats you.

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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by False View Post
    This is why I learn to do things on my own. There is almost nothing on a bike a competent adult shouldn't be able to handle with the right tools.
    Textbook example of begging the question. Competence is the ability to handle things given the right tools ;-)

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by zaskaranddriver View Post
    What universe do we live in where this guy has more rep power than me?
    LMAO! Since you almost had me spraying my beer at my monitor, I will do my part to get this universe right by reppin you. Just don't forget to rep me for repping you.

  18. #18
    singletrack bound
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    Quote Originally Posted by zaskaranddriver View Post
    What universe do we live in where this guy has more rep power than me?
    + repped just because I can.........
    Sorrel Seeker !!

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by bwheelin View Post
    i'm going to stick with it and play along with an 18 cog when i get a chance.
    you have a 16t cog right now. if you switch to an 18t cog, it will be easier to pedal.

    READ THE SS FAQ SECTION

  20. #20
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    I followed Bwheelin's other thread too.
    Just wondering if you did the "ride your bike in one gear" thing, before deciding on going SS.
    In my case, I bought a KHS Solo One from someone who had it set up as a 1x9. I tried riding it in one gear without shifting before setting it up SS. I rode like this for months to get my leg strength up. I learned pretty quickly that standing was the best way to climb the steeps. Also that I would have to get used to spinning out on the flats.

    I guess what I am asking is. What made you take the SS leap?

  21. #21
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    to second what others have said, an 18t rear makes a difference. I was running a 16t before, and while it gave you a taller ratio, which was good for going down hills/in town, I found it wasn't ideal for a lot of trail riding. I sacrificed some speed for more low end with the 18t cog, but imo, for all the hills and sweet single track around here, it was worth it. I love my junker SS as much as I love my big 29er K-monkey. SS's are a lot of fun once you warm up to them. Don't bail on them just yet!
    -Eric
    Keeping the hardtail dream alive, one ride at a time.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by esundell90 View Post
    to second what others have said, an 18t rear makes a difference. I was running a 16t before, and while it gave you a taller ratio, which was good for going down hills/in town, I found it wasn't ideal for a lot of trail riding. I sacrificed some speed for more low end with the 18t cog, but imo, for all the hills and sweet single track around here, it was worth it. I love my junker SS as much as I love my big 29er K-monkey. SS's are a lot of fun once you warm up to them. Don't bail on them just yet!
    i currently have a 16t and will continue to ride it and experiment but at the moment it feels like i don't have enough power. i'm using the bike for on road, occasional off road, biking around town and to the store type.

  23. #23
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    well to get more torque (AKA "power") you'd need to run something like an 18t rear. This will give you the ability to have a more useable powerband lower down, however, you won't be able to cruise at as high of a speed as you will with the 16t. But you won't have to hammer up hills as hard. If you use yours more in town, I don't see anything wrong with the 16t.
    -Eric
    Keeping the hardtail dream alive, one ride at a time.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by esundell90 View Post
    well to get more torque (AKA "power") you'd need to run something like an 18t rear. This will give you the ability to have a more useable powerband lower down, however, you won't be able to cruise at as high of a speed as you will with the 16t. But you won't have to hammer up hills as hard. If you use yours more in town, I don't see anything wrong with the 16t.
    I understand what you are saying, but your premise isn't right. If my memory serves:

    Torque x Speed = Power.

    So, it's true that if you are looking for more mechanical advantage you would want more torque, and less speed, but in that scenario, the mechanical advantage is the desired outcome, and the power has remained the same.

    If you look at the rest of the thread it seems like he doesn't want to spin out as much when he is riding on the roads. In this case he is looking for more Speed, and less Torque, still he could end up with the same amount of Power. So an 18 isn't really what he wants. And, it sounds like a taller gear than a 16 is what he wants, like maybe a 14/15.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by jtrops View Post
    I understand what you are saying, but your premise isn't right. If my memory serves:

    Torque x Speed = Power.

    So, it's true that if you are looking for more mechanical advantage you would want more torque, and less speed, but in that scenario, the mechanical advantage is the desired outcome, and the power has remained the same.

    If you look at the rest of the thread it seems like he doesn't want to spin out as much when he is riding on the roads. In this case he is looking for more Speed, and less Torque, still he could end up with the same amount of Power. So an 18 isn't really what he wants. And, it sounds like a taller gear than a 16 is what he wants, like maybe a 14/15.
    I agree, it seems he wants something a little taller with the gearing for his riding, hence why I said the 16t should be fine, hey, he may even want to go taller than that.

    The way I understand it is this. Torque is mechanical force. Measurements of power, lets say Horsepower, is a measure of torque or work performed over a certain time period. However the torque exerted on a bike greatly depends on the rider, and the mechanical gearing advantage of the bike itself.
    -Eric
    Keeping the hardtail dream alive, one ride at a time.

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