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  1. #1
    indigosky
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    How to make a headset cup removal tool?

    Has anyone bought some copper pipe, cut it length wise and spread the flanges similar to the park headset cup removal tool to create a cheap version???

    How did it work? What size pipe did you use??? Thinking copper because it's a reasonably soft metal and (hopefully) shouldn't f-up the cups too bad.

    Thanks.
    Last edited by indigosky; 12-28-2004 at 01:00 PM.

  2. #2
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    ~ 1" PVC pipe. Cut a couple slots 2" long at one end, insert a nut (well, not what you're thinking ok) or something to spread it apart once it's in the headtube. Both sides of the pipe will seat on the inside of the cup. Then pound away. If you want to save the cup use something to catch it as it'll fly away real good.

    PVC pipe will probably be better than copper, and less expensive.

    Maurice

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by indigosky
    Has anyone bought some copper pipe, cut it length wise and spread the flanges similar to the park headset cup removal tool to create a cheap version???

    How did it work? What size pipe did you use??? Thinking copper because it's a reasonably soft metal and (hopefully) shouldn't f-up the cups too bad.

    Thanks.
    Yup.

    I used some conduit that I found in the garage. It
    was about 3/4".

    Works just as well as the Park tool, as far as I'm concerned.

  4. #4
    rejected
    Reputation: gspot's Avatar
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    I use a screwdriver... A couple of quick taps, and it's out. If you're careful, then the cup won't be damaged. Try it. Go slow.
    I also put the cups in with a hammer, and a block of wood to cushion the cup.

  5. #5
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    I have used a park dh tire lever before to knock out hs cups. Works well and doesn't damage them. The pvc idea is a good one though...

  6. #6
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    I've used a length of aluminum rod (which cost a buck) in a variation on the screwdriver technique. I've never had a problem with the aluminum damaging either the headtube or a cup.

  7. #7
    Bike Shop Manager
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    if you don't push the cups straight out, you risk damageing the headset cups, our your frame, better to get the right tool, for the job..
    I sold all my bikes, now I have to run behind all my group rides

  8. #8
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    I did the same thing but using a handlebar instead of PVC. It works but I believe that the plastic PVC damages a lot less the cups than a piece of metal like a screwdriver or handlebar.

  9. #9
    Enjoying Every Sandwich
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    Quote Originally Posted by gspot
    I also put the cups in with a hammer, and a block of wood to cushion the cup.

    I used a rubber mallet last night to put mine in. They look square and I didn't have to pound too hard on them to get them in. No damage on the head tube that I can see with the naked eye.

    Any suggestions on a Crown Race tool? Would PVC work that is just over 1 1/8" in diameter?

    I don't want to spend the money or pay the shop fees on a simple task I can do at home.


    I've read posts from people like myself that just want to do it at home and have had no problems and I've also read posts from others that say go buy the proper tool. To each his own I guess. My point is, I've only got $42 in my frame. If I bend the head tube or "oval" it, then no big deal to me. However if I had a new frame, I would probably either spend the money to take it to a shop and have it done or I would bite the bullet and buy the proper tool for the job.

    Just my $0.02.

  10. #10
    the wrench
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    if youre not careful you can muck up the frame and h/set just as easially with a park tool h/set press as you can with a hammer and a 2by4. the easiest way to remove a h/set w/o building a tool for it is to use an old large flathead, you know the ones that have been demoted to pry bar status because they are rounded off. i say use an old one because the soft rounded eadges wont gouge the h set. the just slowly tap the h.set out being careful to do it evenly as you go.
    do it, do it DO IT!!
    DOOOO IIIIIT!!

  11. #11
    mmmm beer
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBUNKY
    Any suggestions on a Crown Race tool? Would PVC work that is just over 1 1/8" in diameter?
    I've set several crown races with a PVC pipe, the only one that beat me thus far was the cane creek race onto my crosscheck fork, had to take that one to the shop. Just a block of wood on top of the pipe and a few stiff whacks with a reasonably heavy hammer.

    I am considering buying the setting too for my new WB .8 though.... I just like neat tools, bike, automotive or otherwise.

  12. #12
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    Depends on the crown race. Big ones such as the Cane Creek ZS can simply be pounded in place with a rubber mallet, by carefully tapping all around. For smaller ones it is more effective to get them started with PVC pipe. Some crown races (FSA I think) have a cut in them which makes installing and removing a snap.

    Tapping usually works well, and that should be the method used even with a PVC pipe.

    Bike maintenance is really not rocket science, and as long as you don't use brute force it will be fine. I have two left hands full of thumbs and have yet to f*ck up something on my bikes...

    Maurice

  13. #13
    Enjoying Every Sandwich
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maurice
    Depends on the crown race. Big ones such as the Cane Creek ZS can simply be pounded in place with a rubber mallet, by carefully tapping all around. For smaller ones it is more effective to get them started with PVC pipe. Some crown races (FSA I think) have a cut in them which makes installing and removing a snap.

    Tapping usually works well, and that should be the method used even with a PVC pipe.

    Bike maintenance is really not rocket science, and as long as you don't use brute force it will be fine. I have two left hands full of thumbs and have yet to f*ck up something on my bikes...

    Maurice
    Cool. It is a Cane Creek but it is the low end S1 model. I have it with me and I am head to Home Depot today. I'll take it in and make sure to get the correct diameter. This one doesn't have the split in it.

    My fork should be in Friday. It's a Surly 1x1.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBUNKY
    Cool. It is a Cane Creek but it is the low end S1 model. I have it with me and I am head to Home Depot today. I'll take it in and make sure to get the correct diameter. This one doesn't have the split in it.

    My fork should be in Friday. It's a Surly 1x1.
    I have an S2, I think it's the same as the S1. The crown race has a rubber lip that can easily be ripped off if the blow is a little off. What I did is I used the bearing as a tight fit and the PVC pipe on top of it because I didn't have the right size pipe handy. Just whacking with the weight of the pipe (4' approx.) was enough to set it right. That was on a 1x1 fork and also on a Fox fork. A word of caution: the bearing I used is still fine even though it's an old one that took some abuse, but you may sacrifice yours if you end up using this method. I didn't care because it's already lived beyond my expectations.

    I also removed the race from the fork, that's something you may have to do. For that a simple sharp bladed knife will do the job. Once it's loosened a little use a screwdriver _with care_. Again both fork and crown came out just fine from that ordeal.

    Maurice

  15. #15
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    one other trick i found that helps putting the cups back in, specially on 1" headsets is to use and old race inside the cup before placing a piece of wood across and applying the hits with a hammer. it sorta evens the force out without ruining the cups..

  16. #16
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    I use the pvc technique also. It's worked fine with a couple of good whacks of a hammer.

  17. #17
    Steamroller
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    Metal beats wood everytime

    My garage is half bike shop and half wood shop. since I always have various pieces of wood around I make good use of it for I have used hardwood dowels to knock headset cups out. You can also use a block of wood and a big hammer to knock them in. Not very high tech and you would be passing up a perfect excuse to buy a cool Park tool, but it works. The good thing about beating on metal stuff with wood is that if there is any damage it is nearly certain to be to the wood. My "persuader" mallet has been persuading stubborn objects for years and while it looks like it has been in a war, it has never damaged anything I beat with it........I stop short of persuading my son with it though.
    [SIZE=2]Two Wheeled and Too Big[/SIZE]

  18. #18
    don't try this at home
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBUNKY

    I've read posts from people like myself that just want to do it at home and have had no problems and I've also read posts from others that say go buy the proper tool. To each his own I guess. My point is, I've only got $42 in my frame. If I bend the head tube or "oval" it, then no big deal to me. However if I had a new frame, I would probably either spend the money to take it to a shop and have it done or I would bite the bullet and buy the proper tool for the job.

    Just my $0.02.

    i think some also depends on how skillful you are with homemade tools. i know i am not. as i'm sure Mike T is. i know without that proper tools, i'ld jack-up my frame/bike. i've tried the less expensive route for home projects and have always regretted not getting the right tool from the beginning. always. i know my limitations and this one is it.

    i got some money for x-mas and bought some tools that are usually too expensive but i got a press, crown race remover and setter for just over $100 inc. shipping. i figure it's a relatively small investment for something that i'll have for a long time. i already picked up a cup remover for $4 at veloswap.

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