Results 1 to 23 of 23
  1. #1
    western NC
    Reputation: HPIguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    454

    Hope pro2 EVO vs pro2 SS / trials Hub?

    Long story short, I'm about to pull the trigger on a new set of wheels for my primary SS. I have a set of Hope hoops (Stans Flow EX rims laced to pro2 EVO SP hubs) on my geared 29er, and I couldn't be happier with them. For the SS however, I'm considering the SS / trials hub for my wheels. But here's the kicker, I don't really ride tech stuff very often as it's a pretty good haul for me to get to anything with a lot of tech riding. This is also my first year back in the saddle, so I'm not even sure I'd notice the extra POE, especially on the SS where the higher ratio offsets the lower POE to an extent. It is roughly a $200 upgrade as well, almost 50% of the price of the factory hoops wheels. So I ask, is it really worth it? Or just buy them and be happy to have a much better wheel set now, and upgrade down the road if I feel the need? (which I doubt to be honest) Thoughts?

  2. #2
    Hairshirt Rider
    Reputation: Loudpawlz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,846
    I rode the Trials hub for about 5 years and switched to Pro 2 Evo because I wanted to run a 12x142 axle. The difference in POE was noticeable, but I can't say it altered my experience. I use the Surly spacer kit.

    Gratuitous bike shot with the trials hub.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Hope pro2 EVO vs pro2 SS / trials Hub?-back.jpg  


  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    387

    Hope pro2 EVO vs pro2 SS / trials Hub?

    Aren't the latest version of Pro II Evos the same engagement as the Trials?

    I have two pairs of the geared version with the steel hub body. Great combo IMO.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    western NC
    Reputation: HPIguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    454
    If I'm not mistaken, the older SS hub was 48POE, and the newer pro2 EVO hubs are 40POE. The newer SS hub is 80POE I think. I'm leaning towards just pulling the trigger on a set now, with the 10% off coupon I have, it's tough to say no.

  5. #5
    I should be out riding
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    1,149
    Quote Originally Posted by HPIguy View Post
    If I'm not mistaken, the older SS hub was 48POE, and the newer pro2 EVO hubs are 40POE. The newer SS hub is 80POE I think. I'm leaning towards just pulling the trigger on a set now, with the 10% off coupon I have, it's tough to say no.
    I believe this is correct.

    I thought the 48 POE on my SS hub was an improvement over the 24 POE Pro II. I have a set of Pro II on my FS bike now with the new 40 POE really can't tell much difference between 40 and 48. I doubt I'd find 80 compelling vs. 40. Pretty sure the newest SS hubs can be converted to 12 x 142 though. But, requires purchasing the parts and doing yourself as they aren't sold that way.

  6. #6
    MTB B'dos
    Reputation: LyNx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    18,615
    What you're missing about the SS/Trials hub is that it will also build a dishless wheel which will be stronger than a a dished full cassette wheel. If you're worried that it's be a specific only wheelset for SS only, then think again, because you can run multiple cogs on it to make it a geared setup - I ran one this way for 6 years with 6 cogs and it worked fantastic.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??
    MTB Barbados
    My Phantom pics

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    87
    The 12x142 axle and end caps for the EVO SS/Trials hub can be ordered directly from Hope USA for 35 bucks.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Saul Lumikko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,627
    If you're happy with the full size freehub model, you pretty much answered your own question.

    Not that I'm one to throw rocks if someone chooses a SS hub, because that's what I have. Yes, it can be built a bit lighter because of symmetrical bracing angles, but it's not something a human would be able to feel really.

  9. #9
    western NC
    Reputation: HPIguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    454
    Quote Originally Posted by Saul Lumikko View Post
    If you're happy with the full size freehub model, you pretty much answered your own question.

    Not that I'm one to throw rocks if someone chooses a SS hub, because that's what I have. Yes, it can be built a bit lighter because of symmetrical bracing angles, but it's not something a human would be able to feel really.
    Saul, are you saying you don't think one would notice the difference in stiffness of the SS hub setup? Just curious, and thanks everyone for the replies and advice so far.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Saul Lumikko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,627
    Given the same general build (rims, spokes, spoke count), no. Of course I'm assuming these things are chosen to make the wheel with the full size freehub stiff enough for the rider and intended use. If this is the case, the slight stiffness advantage of the SS hub would not be noticeable.

    If the wheel was under-built, then the "geared" wheel would feel flexy and the SS hub less so, but this would be a biased comparison and I don't think it's relevant to talk about under-built stuff.

    Basically the SS hub would allow to use lighter components to make a wheel of equal stiffness, but the weight difference would be rather small. I don't think any rider would be able to tell the difference in a blind test.

    -----

    I do use SS-specific hubs, they look nice, perform better on the internet and gives a bit of special feeling to the bike. If you're not going geared (or will settle for fewer cogs) I do recommend SS hubs. I just don't want to make inflated claims about their benefits, which are actually quite small. If someone is riding a SS bike with a full cassette hub and spacer kit, they should not feel at all bad about it.

  11. #11
    western NC
    Reputation: HPIguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    454
    Quote Originally Posted by Saul Lumikko View Post
    perform better on the internet
    LOL, now that's funny. Thanks for taking the time to reply Saul, I appreciate it. Since it's for a dedicated SS, I think I'll spring for a dedicated wheel setup for it.

  12. #12
    MTB B'dos
    Reputation: LyNx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    18,615
    I think maybe Saul got this one right, you'd prob feel a different strength rim more, but I can't say for certain. My Hope Pro2 SS/Trials hub is laced to a Stans Flow with DT Swiss Comp spokes, as a comparison where I can't say I feel the difference, my Nukeproof wheel with a 135 x 10 setup is laced to a WTB ST i25 rim with same spokes.

    Now to me the WTB rim is much stouter than the Flow and heavier, so builds a stronger wheel overall and to be honest I'd be hard pressed to say which is stiffer, add to that that the WTB has internal width of 25mm compared to the older Flow @ 23mm and there's bound to be some difference there as well.

    With my new wheel for my Phantom built on a 150 x 12 hub with the WTB ST i25 rims, I can definitely feel a stiffness increase over the old Pro2 SS/Trials on Flow wheel, it's not much, but it's there, you can feel the subtle increase where it matters most on off camber stuff and hard cornering and that's where you'd also notice the difference between the SS specific hub compared to the full cassette version.

    What I like about the SS/Trials dedicated version is the steel freehub, so having that gouged up by a cog isn't really an issue, plus if only a bit more than the newer Pro2 EVO, the engagement is a bit better.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??
    MTB Barbados
    My Phantom pics

  13. #13
    western NC
    Reputation: HPIguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    454
    Well, I just paid for my new wheels and opted for the SS rear hub option. Thanks for all the help everyone, can't wait to ride them!

  14. #14
    western NC
    Reputation: HPIguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    454
    Wheels and tires are here! Needless to say I'm pretty excited to ride 'em this weekend.


    Hope pro2 single speed rear hub
    Hope pro2 evo front hub
    Stans Flow EX rims
    double butted spokes with brass nips
    Bontrager XR4 expert 27.5 x 2.35 front
    Bontrager XR3 expert 27.5 x 2.20 rear


    I have the same tire combo on my 29er and they rock for around here


  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    770
    I just ordered a set of Pro 2 evo 40T hubs and am awaiting delivery. Considering I weigh 165 lbs my LBS told me he didn't think I would notice any stiffness increase with the dished wheel vs the dishless. He is a smaller guy like me and all his SS have the Hope cassette hubs on them and spacer kits and he said he doesn't notice. Look how many people ride geared bikes and they hold up fine unless you run off a cliff.......

  16. #16
    western NC
    Reputation: HPIguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    454
    For me, it wasn't so much about the stiffness as it was the higher POE. I plan to ride more and more tech stuff on the SS, so it's nice. And, there was no price increase for the SS hub build vs the regular so why not in my case. I have regular pro2 EVOs on my 29er, and I love those too.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    770
    40 poe is still pretty good for ss isn't it? I was told it was pretty good.

  18. #18
    western NC
    Reputation: HPIguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    454
    Yes, there's nothing wrong with that at all. You'll have a nice wheel set, don't sweat it.

  19. #19
    Stateline Falls, Watauga
    Reputation: JeffL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    229
    The point about dished vs dishless isn't about wheel stiffness or ride feel. It's about durability.

    A highly dished wheel is going to need more maintenance over time. A symmetric dishing is evenly tensioned, has much less spoke flex, and is less likely to go out of true. The spoke flex I'm talking about is not wheel flex you can feel or notice. It's the instantaneous unloading and loading of the spokes under pedaling force which will cause each spoke to repeatedly flex - mostly at its 90 degree bend. This flexing is what causes spokes to fail. SS wheel's spokes flex less and last longer.

    And once a wheel goes out of true the dishing is a big factor. Pop a spoke on an SS wheel and it's easily fixed, even on the trail. Pop a spoke on a dished rear wheel and it's likely to become instantly unrideable.
    It never gets easier, you just go faster. -Greg LeMond
    I'm not as fast as I think I am. -JeffL

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    770
    Quote Originally Posted by JeffL View Post
    The point about dished vs dishless isn't about wheel stiffness or ride feel. It's about durability.

    A highly dished wheel is going to need more maintenance over time. A symmetric dishing is evenly tensioned, has much less spoke flex, and is less likely to go out of true. The spoke flex I'm talking about is not wheel flex you can feel or notice. It's the instantaneous unloading and loading of the spokes under pedaling force which will cause each spoke to repeatedly flex - mostly at its 90 degree bend. This flexing is what causes spokes to fail. SS wheel's spokes flex less and last longer.

    And once a wheel goes out of true the dishing is a big factor. Pop a spoke on an SS wheel and it's easily fixed, even on the trail. Pop a spoke on a dished rear wheel and it's likely to become instantly unrideable.
    one of the deciding factors for me that was brought up by my shop was resale value. If for any reason I decide to sell something in the future of course it will is going to sell easier than a single speed wheel especially around here.plus if for any reason I ever decide to go gears again I've got that option without building another wheelset. Not saying that I will do that but it was more of a multi-purpose wheel.

  21. #21
    western NC
    Reputation: HPIguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    454
    ^^That's a valid point. But in my case, I have zero intentions of ever selling this bike, so resale was of no concern to me.

  22. #22
    MTB B'dos
    Reputation: LyNx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    18,615
    If you always build/do stuff like that, then you'll always compromise on things, always build/buy like you intent to keep it until it implodes from use.

    Quote Originally Posted by HPIguy View Post
    ^^That's a valid point. But in my case, I have zero intentions of ever selling this bike, so resale was of no concern to me.
    Quote Originally Posted by iowamtb View Post
    one of the deciding factors for me that was brought up by my shop was resale value. If for any reason I decide to sell something in the future of course it will is going to sell easier than a single speed wheel especially around here.plus if for any reason I ever decide to go gears again I've got that option without building another wheelset. Not saying that I will do that but it was more of a multi-purpose wheel.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??
    MTB Barbados
    My Phantom pics

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    770
    I have no doubt that a dish list wheel is stronger. When I was talking to my bike shop about building me some wheels I asked them if I should go with single speed hubs or cassette hubs. Considering they were all 100% single speed riders I figured they had some good opinions. He asked me how much I weighed and I said 165 to 170 and he said you shouldn't have no problem riding single speed on a cassette hub. He said he weighed pretty close to that himself and all of his bikes had cassette hubs set up a single speeds. So I'm not arguing that point regarding the two different wheel types I'm just saying I'm not too concerned about it considering my lightweight.

Similar Threads

  1. Hope Pro2 Evo 9MM Thru-Axle vs QR?
    By EatsDirt in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-13-2014, 11:54 PM
  2. New Hope Pro2 hubs... when will we see them?
    By pimpbot in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-27-2013, 01:05 PM
  3. Hope Pro2 Evo to WTB i23 29er
    By TR in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-18-2013, 12:55 AM
  4. Hope pro2 hub rear
    By vince7870 in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 10-07-2012, 11:10 PM
  5. Hope Pro2 Evo SS Conversion
    By irv_usc in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-04-2012, 04:30 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Can't find it? Just search our site!