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  1. #1
    sufferer of a.d.d.
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    help. should i buy a bianchi diss

    i am bout to buy a bianchi diss as my first ss. any thoughts. i was looking forward to ss-ing mainly due to the light weight but the diss is said to be close to 25#. what is making it so darn heavy? is there anything i can do to slim it down? or should i just buy a different bike?

  2. #2
    www.jollypumpkin.com
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    Well...

    Quote Originally Posted by warmseth
    i am bout to buy a bianchi diss as my first ss. any thoughts. i was looking forward to ss-ing mainly due to the light weight but the diss is said to be close to 25#. what is making it so darn heavy? is there anything i can do to slim it down? or should i just buy a different bike?
    I have a CuSS which I believe to be pretty much the same frame as the DiSS with the exception of the brake bosses. I stripped all the parts off the frame and am waiting for some new ones to build it back up. I hope to have a weight on the frame soon, however right now I can tell you... it's LIGHT. I've owned a DiSS before and I think the weight lies in the stem, fork, bb, seat, and cranks. If you plan on upgrading the parts you could have a pretty light bike.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
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    maybe...

    Quote Originally Posted by warmseth
    i am bout to buy a bianchi diss as my first ss. any thoughts. i was looking forward to ss-ing mainly due to the light weight but the diss is said to be close to 25#. what is making it so darn heavy? is there anything i can do to slim it down? or should i just buy a different bike?
    ...but I've never ridden a rigid aluminum bike. I waited for the steel version (SISS) to come out because of the supposedly smoother ride. If you're going to put a shock on it, then aluminum should be ok. I think what makes the bike heavier are the disc brakes and wheel set, but I've never found the weight to be a big set back even on my steel bike. I like the SISS very much. The geometry seems to work for me. My only gripe is that the frame could be a little stiffer and the rear disc brakes with horizontal dropouts can be finicky when changing a flat on the trail. Better to go with EBB.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
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    go for it

    I owned a Bianchi BuSS a few years ago and loved it. My buddy has a DiSS and he loves it. Last night on a ride we swapped bikes (his first downhill on my fixie 29er....he only forgot to pedal a time or two) and I took his DiSS for a while....I think it's a great bike. He put even bigger tires on than stock so it does weigh more, but I don't think of the DiSS as a heavy bike. Stem, bars, post, saddle, cranks and bb could be lighter, but for the price, how can you complain?

  5. #5
    One gear to rule them all
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    I rode a DISS for about a year...

    I loved the bike, I did not use any of the stock parts, except for the brakes. Mine was built up at around 20 lbs. Great ride, the first thing I would change, would be those heavy wire bead tires. There are plenty of upgrades you could make, to drop some weight.
    If it fit me better I would still be ridding it.
    Todd............. If you can't be kind, at least have the decency to be vague

  6. #6
    ali'i hua
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    get the SASS (shiny a$$ed single speed- frikking bad word editor) and be the first on your block to blind everyone!

  7. #7
    Tripolar on most days
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    ... and if we just ... I got a used DISS in Oct and love it.

    The bike is mostly all stock right now but I will be changing out some parts as they wear.
    The bike was a little heavier then I thought it was going to be but when riding it I don't even notice it at all. As someone said above the components on the bike are the major reason for the extra weight, but I wouldn't let it discurage you from getting it. With the ridgid fork the bike is a tank and I feel as I could go threw, up, down, and around anything. The only problem with the bike is user error at times, judging when to put the hammer down and when not to.
    Be the person your dog thinks you are.

  8. #8
    Tripolar on most days
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    Thought you might like a picture.

    This is the DISS
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Be the person your dog thinks you are.

  9. #9
    Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
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    i love mine...

    it's 24.0 lbs with kevlar tires, a thompson post, different saddle and pedals and the rest stock. it's not that heavy, and it feels really light on the trial. i'm sure with a lighter fork it would be 23.0 lbs easy.
    [size=1][/size]

  10. #10
    sufferer of a.d.d.
    Reputation: warmseth's Avatar
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    ok i bought it. $500 + $45 shipping. not too bad for my first ss'er. i officially just got dissed!


    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...tem=3654927280

  11. #11
    www.jollypumpkin.com
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    Frame Weight

    The frame weight of the 19.5" CuSS (practically same frame as the DiSS) is 3.6 lbs

  12. #12
    sufferer of a.d.d.
    Reputation: warmseth's Avatar
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    so did i get ripped off paying $550 or is this a fair deal or is this a good deal?

  13. #13
    Paintbucket
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    Quote Originally Posted by warmseth
    so did i get ripped off paying $550 or is this a fair deal or is this a good deal?
    Depends on how much fun you have on it, doesn't it?
    Zippy for president

  14. #14
    Derailleurs owned: 0
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    for comparison:

    Here are a few past DISS deals from ebay:

    Very nice complete bike:

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...tem=3630738481


    The seller of this frame didnt mention that the right chainstay tube had been nearly worn through by misaligned tire:

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...tem=3636518313

    so I bought this unused frame as backup...

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...tem=3638431574


    CJ

  15. #15
    glyphic bacon
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    Thats a really good deal....

    ...the only thing that kinda sucks about a used bike is that the warranty doesn't come with the frame, and these frames are known to crack from time to time. But, some dealers will still swap out a broken frame, especially if you are a regular customer.

    As far as the DISS is concerned I have one and like it. It came with a great part spec for the money. Although it does weigh probably around 25 lbs, but that's still good for the quality/durability of the parts and the price. You could definitely lighten the bike right up by doing the following:

    1. The stock Titec bars and seatpost are tough and durable, but heavy. If lightness really is important replace these. (Thompson seatpost and a lightweight Al 175 gram FSA riser bar would be my pick)

    2. The wheelset is tough and durable, but heavy. I've ridden into tangles of sticks which have been kicked up into my spokes and these wheels just eat em up, spit em out and keep on going...no muss no fuss. Plus very little spoke adjusting/tightening has been necessary (after initial set in). But the WTB rims and spokes and front hub are not like XTR's or anything in lightness.

    3. I dont think the rear spot hub is really light, but I dont think its a boat anchor either. Probably keep it if you can, if not go to CK's or maybe DT swiss (thats what I'm considering now).

    4. The Stock seat is pretty nice but not quite as light as the Ti version.

    5. The stock tires have wire beads, consider upgrading to kevlars or another tire with light tubes (or tubeless), or Stans no tubes (which are supposedly the shite for cheap weight savings). This is probably one of the most cost effective ways to save weight.

    6. Never tried eggbeaters, have heard mixed things. I like my Times, but the eggbeaters are considerably lighter...maybe try them out?

    7. The brakes are very good. I would not replace these, even if slightly lighter (and more expensive) versions are available. The Avid mechs just plain rock, and they are especially useful on the rear where the horizontal dropouts make getting the rear disc alignment a little more difficult (after removing/replacing the rear wheel) to achieve than with EBB frames.


    Here is a list of gripes, "hey, look out for these" issues:

    1. The ISIS BB is a piece of crap. It will probably fail pretty quickly on you (mine failed in less than a month of riding). I replaced my crankset with a Shimano Octalink XT, but would have been just as happy with a good quality square taper.

    2. The masterlink clip is usually facing the wrong direction on the chain causing it to click (rub) against the chainguard every time it passes over the chainring. reverse it and you should be ok.

    3. The chainline is usually out on these bikes. You have to move the chainring to the outside (where the rockguard normally is) to get it to line up correctly. Either eliminate the rockgaurd (saving some weight or move it to the inside).

    4. The stock Avid pads wear out very quickly, especially in mud (although Avid is supposedly working to fix that problem). I use EBC gold pads and have been much happier (plus they are nearly half the price of Avids).

    5. The rear spot hub frequently is not setup properly and has its bearings bound. The hubs bearings need to be setup properly and "set" with the proper lash..if you dont do this, you will experience rear hub drag (slowing you down) and premature bearing failure (stoppin you altogether). Look on product reviews for setup info...not hard to do, but you definitely want to check on this.

    6. Sometimes the stock WTB tires are out of round. My front tire warbled and although rideable, I replaced it with a lighter kevlar version.

    7. The paint chips easily and cables rub in certain loactions (especially around the headstock). Route and secure cables with zip ties and maybe wrap some black electrical tape around the lower part of the headstock to prevent chafing.

    8. the stock headset is really cheap, but surprisingly it has held up all season (which I didnt expect it to do). I greased it really well when I first got it, so I would advise doing the same. Of course you could replace it with a CK and also save a few grammages.


    Umm, other than that, the bike is good. I think you'll like it. Its pretty bone jarring with a rigid up front, I put a 4" Duke on mine and am much happier that way, but some guys have tungsten cartlidge in their wrists, so to each his own. Other than that the bike will serve you well, good luck with it.

  16. #16
    34N 118W
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    congrats & welcome! (nm)

  17. #17
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    I had the original D.I.S.S. prototype before it was stolen from the Bianchi warehouse then a replacement when it became available during production.

    There were two prototypes, one 21" and the second was 17" and both were essentially repainted C.U.S.S. frames because the frames and forks came with canti bosses on them. They were pretty much identical except the smaller of the two had PAUL hubs and mine used Spot. During the production I think they switched to a WTB hub up front.

    I was riding a Spot single speed up to the point that I was given the 21" prototype to ride and in a lot of ways I think it road better than the Spot because it was more stable at higher speeds because the bike had a slightly longer wheel base and the bottom bracket height was lower, the brakes worked better, and it absorbed shock better even when being ridden with a rigid fork.

    My only real complaints about the D.I.S.S. were that the bottom bracket sucked balls, rearward slotted drops with a disc brake are a hassle, the stock chain would explode, and the stock headset would fall apart. Last my big disappointment with the bike was that the prototype at a nice Sun Race freewheel on the back.

    Yeah, I know, "nice" and "Sun Race" are somewhat of an oxymoron but Sun Race had made a freewheel that worked a lot like the silent clutch mechanism that Shimano used a couple of years ago. It was quiet and you had plenty of engagement almost any where during your pedal stroke. Sun Race never got their **** together and to the best of my knowledge the project has been shelved.

    So, should you buy this bike ? It's hard to recommend a used aluminum frame from any builder especially lighter weight UltraLite or scanium frames because of their potential limited life spans. To it's credit, while I was working at Bianchi, I never saw a D.I.S.S. break. Yes, I saw a broken B.U.S.S. and C.U.S.S. frame but not a D.I.S.S. Take that as you will.

    You can probably find a new P.U.S.S. frame floating around and that would be a good choice. If you can find a D.I.S.S. with low miles then it would also be a good choice but don't expect light weight aluminum frames to last forever.

    Last but not least the prototype D.I.S.S. is still floating around somewhere. Yeah, it's long shot and it's probably trashed at this point but if any one has any leads on it I'd love to have it back.

  18. #18
    Teen Wolf
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    lmao
    Last edited by cr45h; 03-09-2008 at 07:05 PM.

  19. #19
    igoslo
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    Wow, since this is a four year old thread you dug up, I think your bike buying advice just might be falling on deaf ears. Who knows though, maybe he's just been waiting this whole time for the perfect answer before pulling the trigger. Let's just wait and see. Oh wait, nope, he didn't, by rereading the whole thread I have discovered that he didn't wait and purchased the bike, in January of '04.

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