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  1. #1
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    Help lightening the load - Haro Mary SS

    I'm pretty much a dope when it comes to replacing parts. I want to lighten the load on my stock 27.5lb Haro Mary SS. It is completely stock except for the Crank Brothers Mallets I have on it.

    Here are the stock specs:

    Fork 29" chromoly rigid fork; suspension corrected
    Crankset & BB Truvativ Stylo 1.1 (180mm on 18,20 175 on 16) /GXP BB
    Bar/Stem Richey Pro stem / On-ONE Mary bar
    Saddle/Seatpost WTB Rocket V Comp saddle/Pivit alloy micro adjust post
    Hubset Pivit Sealed 4 bearing rear cassette / Pivit front
    Front/Rear Rim WTB Laserdisc Trail 29"
    Front/Rear Tire Kenda Nevegal 29" 2.2 Stick-E Rubber
    Front/Rear Brakes Avid BB5 mechanical disc brakes 160mm Rotors


    and a link to its page from Haro (if it helps): http://www.harobikes.com/mtb/tab2_subNav5.php

    Pretty much ride in NC - mostly cross country trails on this bike.


    Can you offer any suggestions on lightening up?


    Only rule is I'm keeping the On One Mary bars (I like them) and will be going with a Cane Creek Thudbuster seatpost.

    I especially want to change the brakes - not been happy with them since ride #1.

    Any thoughts appreciated...

    Erik

  2. #2
    Help I've Fallen
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    Replace the wheel set with Stan's Arch rims and good quality hubs, then replace the kenda tires and go tubeless. It worked for me.
    Life's tough......It's even tougher if you're stupid." -John Wayne

  3. #3
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    +1 on the wheels.
    Next, I'd look at switching out the fork. I bet you could drop a pound or more. Not a fan of aluminum but ebay has one that weighs 2.1 lbs and is pretty cheap.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/eXotic-29er-Rigi...#ht_1139wt_941

    What is it that you don't like about the Avids? I have been running some older bb7's for 5 years or so and have been great.

    Hard to lose a lot of weight a couple grams at a time and gets expensive quickly. Change some things and ride that thing hard.

  4. #4
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    I have a Haro Mary SS, I changed to a eXotic carbon fork which shaved some weight and gave me a better ride. I've never really understood trying to shave weight with expensive components on an inexpensive bike, I went carbon on the fork to improve riding performance, the weight savings were just a bonus. The money you'll have to spend to lighten up this bike will probably be more than you'd spend on a new ride. Having said that if I were trying shave weight I'd go tubeless. As far as brakes I'd up grade to Avid BB7s from the stock BB5s, much better performance, and you can keep your stock levers.

    I concur with zazen, it's a SS ride hard.
    Happy Trails
    Jolly

  5. #5
    SSolo
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    Saddle, seatpost, tires, and pedals are going to be the cheapest and most effective. Wheelset would be nice but going to cost ya and the stockers seem pretty good to me...nice balance of strength and weight.

    WTB Devo or someghing similar saddlewise, Crank Bros Candy pedals, Thompson seatpost, Geax Saguaro 29x2.3 tires with tubes. I don't trust CF forks or seatposts....but they're your teeth. Aluminum fork would be really harsh riding, the stock steel won't let you down catastrophically if it gets bent.

    Quote Originally Posted by jollybeggar
    I have a Haro Mary SS, I changed to a eXotic carbon fork which shaved some weight and gave me a better ride. I've never really understood trying to shave weight with expensive components on an inexpensive bike, I went carbon on the fork to improve riding performance, the weight savings were just a bonus. The money you'll have to spend to lighten up this bike will probably be more than you'd spend on a new ride. Having said that if I were trying shave weight I'd go tubeless. As far as brakes I'd up grade to Avid BB7s from the stock BB5s, much better performance, and you can keep your stock levers.

    I concur with zazen, it's a SS ride hard.
    X2, but I dont trust carbon forks!
    Fat, drunk, and stupid is no way to go through life son...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by zazen
    +1 on the wheels.
    Next, I'd look at switching out the fork. I bet you could drop a pound or more. Not a fan of aluminum but ebay has one that weighs 2.1 lbs and is pretty cheap.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/eXotic-29er-Rigi...#ht_1139wt_941

    What is it that you don't like about the Avids? I have been running some older bb7's for 5 years or so and have been great.

    Hard to lose a lot of weight a couple grams at a time and gets expensive quickly. Change some things and ride that thing hard.

    I think you, and the poster below you, hit the nail on the head. It comes with stock bb5's and from day one I've had to sqeeze the life out of them on steep decents. My bike is now in the LBS having them adjusted (though I suspect most of that problem is cable stretch on this new bike). Reading the reviews of this bike on this site it seems most everyone who changed their 5's went to 7's and were very happy. I think that is where I'm heading - not so much for weight - but for performance. Nary a bad word I've read abot the 7's.

    Thanks for your comments.

  7. #7
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    Thanks Jolly - wise sentiment I think.

    Nate: You said, "X2, but I dont trust carbon forks!"

    I've never heard anyone say that - why do you feel that way. I may be able to get my hands on a Ops 8 or a WB carbon fork and am considering. That decision is taking a back seat to the brakes and the thudbuster. Just curious as to your opinion on carbon forks....

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van-Go
    Thanks Jolly - wise sentiment I think.

    Nate: You said, "X2, but I dont trust carbon forks!"

    I've never heard anyone say that - why do you feel that way. I may be able to get my hands on a Ops 8 or a WB carbon fork and am considering. That decision is taking a back seat to the brakes and the thudbuster. Just curious as to your opinion on carbon forks....
    And oddly enough, an aluminum fork was suggested in the same post, which has never seemed like a good idea to me due to the flex caused by braking.

    But, as Nate said, they're not my teeth, so go crazy with it.
    When you get older, much of your hate comes from knowledge and experience, which is why really old people hate everyone

  9. #9
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    Not sure what kinda trails you're riding, but those tires are heavy and sticky. If you're looking into a thudbuster, then you probably need the big volume front and back, but you could put a faster rolling tire with less agressive tread on the back, such as a WTB Exiwolf, Maxxis Ardent, or similar, and save the spare Kenda to go on the front when the first wears out (this is a free upgrade when seen long-term!).

    Do look into going tubeless, whether with current rims or with another wheelset. This made the biggest difference to me on my Mary, and I'll never go back to tubes on any off-road bike. Granted, I was running slimed tubes before going tubeless, and those are crazy heavy. The bike felt SOOOO much lighter afterwards.

    The BB5s were the only real problem I had with the stock bike - they would not stay adjusted no matter what. Very frustrating. I finally broke down and bought '08 XT hydraulics which have worked flawlessly. An investment, but no regrets. I've had BB7s and liked those, too. Have you considered a 7" rotor up front?

    I think a carbon fiber makes sense if you're areas not too rocky and you're not a daredevil - but probably down the rode - pricey. And an aluminum fork is a terrible idea.

    Isn't the Mary Bar the best? I loved it from second one. I also like the cranks.

    This isn't weight related, but some new grips make a big difference if they're still stocking the same lousy WTB grips that they did back in '07. ESI Chunkys are popular, but others like ODI/Oury, Ergon, and a couple others. I couldn't believe how much vibration the ESIs cancelled out.

    Also, I personally don't think its dumb upgrading parts on the Mary frame. I upgraded almost every part on my Mary over two years before replacing it, and don't regret it at all. Its a good frame, and pretty bullet proof. And if/when you get a new 29er frame, you can swap most/all your parts over.
    ride natty ride

  10. #10
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    Jollybeggar hit the nail on the head!!!!

    "The money you'll have to spend to lighten up this bike will probably be more than you'd spend on a new ride"

    I probably sound like your father but find all the parts you want to put on the bike and add up how much it's going to cost, including paying the bike shop to install it and you might think a little bit differently on lightening up compared to finding a new bike or used bike.

    I was in the same boat you were and then did the math for a fork, wheelset, brakes, tires and stem and seatpost and realized i was better off selling my stock bike and take a hundred fifty dollar hit on it and find the bike i really wanted.
    I found someone who already built up a killer bike and was selling it for way less than i could of bought it for. It was almost new too

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryder1
    Not sure what kinda trails you're riding, but those tires are heavy and sticky. If you're looking into a thudbuster, then you probably need the big volume front and back, but you could put a faster rolling tire with less agressive tread on the back, such as a WTB Exiwolf, Maxxis Ardent, or similar, and save the spare Kenda to go on the front when the first wears out (this is a free upgrade when seen long-term!).

    Do look into going tubeless, whether with current rims or with another wheelset. This made the biggest difference to me on my Mary, and I'll never go back to tubes on any off-road bike. Granted, I was running slimed tubes before going tubeless, and those are crazy heavy. The bike felt SOOOO much lighter afterwards.

    The BB5s were the only real problem I had with the stock bike - they would not stay adjusted no matter what. Very frustrating. I finally broke down and bought '08 XT hydraulics which have worked flawlessly. An investment, but no regrets. I've had BB7s and liked those, too. Have you considered a 7" rotor up front?

    I think a carbon fiber makes sense if you're areas not too rocky and you're not a daredevil - but probably down the rode - pricey. And an aluminum fork is a terrible idea.

    Isn't the Mary Bar the best? I loved it from second one. I also like the cranks.

    This isn't weight related, but some new grips make a big difference if they're still stocking the same lousy WTB grips that they did back in '07. ESI Chunkys are popular, but others like ODI/Oury, Ergon, and a couple others. I couldn't believe how much vibration the ESIs cancelled out.

    Also, I personally don't think its dumb upgrading parts on the Mary frame. I upgraded almost every part on my Mary over two years before replacing it, and don't regret it at all. Its a good frame, and pretty bullet proof. And if/when you get a new 29er frame, you can swap most/all your parts over.
    Thanks for your reply - fellow Mary rider.

    Had not thought about that tire combination - something to think about. I do not know a lot about tires/wheelsets/hubs so I'm going to ask a dumb question - did you mean to say I can use tubeless with my stock wheelset? I figured I'd need a new wheelset and tubeless tires to do that. Either way - what tubeless set up are you using on your Mary (wheelset and tires - make/model)?

    Definitely want to go to the bb7's and am looking for those.

    I do really like the On One Mary bar. Just a different feel and it really helps me on the uphills - I can pull on them for leverage when I have to much better b/c of their position.

    They still have the WTB grips you got on yours. I like them but the vibration issue is enough where I may take your advice on the Chunky's.

    None of these changes are overly expensive (except going tubeless) - the fork change probably will not happen unless I get a great deal. As others mentioned there is the basic cost of the bike vs. the fork. I was lucky enough to get my Mary at a LBS brand new for $599. Putting a $340 WB rigid carbon fork seems ridiculous....but I may have someone willing to sell me their used one on the cheap. Still, the steel stock fork does a great job when I lower the pressure.

    Anyhow, thanks for your comments and if you do not mind mentioning your tubeless set up I'd appreciate it....

  12. #12
    human dehumidifier
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van-Go
    Definitely want to go to the bb7's and am looking for those.
    BB7s are cheap cheap cheap at pricepoint until the end of the month

    Also, look at origin8 for a carbon fork.- no price on their site though http://www.origin-8.com/product_deta...rbon&cl1=FORKS
    When you get older, much of your hate comes from knowledge and experience, which is why really old people hate everyone

  13. #13
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    'Putting a $340 WB rigid carbon fork seems ridiculous...."

    I paid like $200 including shipping.

    Check out the eXotic carbon 29er fork.
    http://www.carboncycles.cc/?s=0&t=0&c=43&p=197&
    Happy Trails
    Jolly

  14. #14
    bhc
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    Another Mary SS rider adding my two cents.

    Of course all depends on where you ride. But I found the Weirwolf up front, though not a weight savings really helped speed up the ride. Along with a Nanoraptor in back. I dropped some weight by replacing the pedals and seat post. Yea the BB5's were a headache, BB7's much better.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van-Go
    Thanks Jolly - wise sentiment I think.

    Nate: You said, "X2, but I dont trust carbon forks!"

    I've never heard anyone say that - why do you feel that way. I may be able to get my hands on a Ops 8 or a WB carbon fork and am considering. That decision is taking a back seat to the brakes and the thudbuster. Just curious as to your opinion on carbon forks....
    Carbon can break catastrophically..........steel stock fork might bend, but prolly won't let your front wheel fall off. I know it has no weight limit, but I'm 205 geared up and there are roots and rocks where I ride. I can visualize it folding in half right under me as I land a small jump into the roots/rocks.

    Who cares what your bike cost, as long as you like the frame.
    Fat, drunk, and stupid is no way to go through life son...

  16. #16
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    If you decide you do not need the Thudbuster, get a Thomson seat post, crazy lite. And if you get into the high end WTB saddles you save a lot of weight.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van-Go
    did you mean to say I can use tubeless with my stock wheelset? I figured I'd need a new wheelset and tubeless tires to do that. Either way - what tubeless set up are you using on your Mary (wheelset and tires - make/model)?
    Riding tubeless is a broad, complex topic of which I have only basic knowledge, but I'll impart my experience and what I (think I) know. Searching mtbr and the web for DiscTrail 29 tubeless would be a good idea.

    Most rim/tire combingations can be set up tubeless, but some set-ups are easier and/or reliable. I have no experience with running the TrailDisc rim tubeless, but Stan's website (notubes.com) provides the following instructions at http://www.notubes.com/support_selecting.php on how to set up the DiscTrail 29 rim to be run tubeless:

    This rim has an extremely large rectangle drop channel in the center of the rim. Remove existing rim strip, use two layers of my 12mm spoke tape over the spoke holes. Then apply one layer of foam weatherseal 3/8 inch wide X 3/16 inch thick in this drop channel. Then install Plus Four rim strip. (Use Frost King foam weatherseal Gray item # V443 $2.00 for a 17' roll).

    I personally never tried to set up Mary's stock wheelset w/o tubes. Its rear wheel was falling apart after a year, so I splurged on a wheelset with Chris King SS hubs and Stan's Arch rims. The Arch is specifically designed to work with Stan's tubeless system for a relatively easy and reliable set-up (which is what I wanted). I use Stan's tape and sealant, and have had no problems after about 70 rides (though I have to use an air compressor b/c I can't get tires to inflate with a floor pump).
    ride natty ride

  18. #18
    SSolo
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    Quote Originally Posted by LWright
    If you decide you do not need the Thudbuster, get a Thomson seat post, crazy lite. And if you get into the high end WTB saddles you save a lot of weight.
    Is there a Thomson seatpost that will eliminate the stock aluminum shim? Seems like this would be a good idea.

    WTB Devo is a great lightweight seat.
    Fat, drunk, and stupid is no way to go through life son...

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Natedogz
    Is there a Thomson seatpost that will eliminate the stock aluminum shim? Seems like this would be a good idea.
    No, none are big enough. Besides, the weight gain would be minimal, and you might be voiding the warranty if you broke the frame in that area. I actually developed a crack in that area (a 1/4" long crack above the main junction on the back of the seat tube near the top of the seat tube). Backing up: After my initial 6 months of riding the bike, I put a 31.6-to-27.2 shim inside the stock shim and started using a 27.2 titanium seatpost. I discovered the crack about a year after that. At that time, my shop told me I probably had 1-2 rides left on the frame. I put in another 30 rides on the frame after that and to no ill effect. I don't know if the double shimming caused the crack. I have not tried to warranty the frame.

    Lynskey's 31.6mm ti post is now available, and they are claiming a weight of 170g for the 350mm model.
    ride natty ride

  20. #20
    bhc
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    I also found a crack in the same location. I did not change out the shim, but did ride with a 31.6 Thomson seat post. Haro replaced the frame for me.

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