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  1. #1
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    Freewheel vs Freewheel Hub

    Is there any advantages to having either? I have a Monocog with a freewheel, am I losing out not having a Freewheel hub?

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by elmomil
    Is there any advantages to having either? I have a Monocog with a freewheel, am I losing out not having a Freewheel hub?

    Thanks
    cassette hubs are useful when you need to dial in gear ratios bc you can easily swap cogs and offer chainline adjustability, but are typically much more expensive than freewheels.

  3. #3
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    I've used both.

    The major advantages of a freehub are chainline and the ability to swap cogs easily. The big downside is when you use skinny cogs - they can chew into the freehub body and maybe even skip. However, spend the extra $8 on a Surly or Gusset cog and you're golden. Oh, and it's typically cheaper to go with a freehub-based wheel than a threaded-hub wheel.

    Freewheels come in two grades, good and not-as-good. White Industries makes awesome freewheels, but they cost a fair bit. I've managed to snap [in half] an ACS Claw and a Shimano freewheel. True, they're under $20 each, but walking home sucks.

  4. #4
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    I prefer a freehub for the flexibility, cost savings, and ability to run a dingle
    I Just Wasn't Made For These Times

  5. #5
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    freewheel hubs have wider-set flanges. if i am not mistaken, this makes for a stronger wheel. using a freehub seems like a waste of space, having a dish a wheel and leave 1 1/2" inches on the side of your hub for no good reason other than the freehub body is made for multiple cogs when you are using only one.

    does anyone make a single-speed mtb cassette hub? being a bmx rider, i am used to these as i have a Profile hub with ti bits on my bmx bike. i suppose profile could make one, just space it wider and make bigger cogs for it. bmx riders tend to like the 9-10 one-piece drivers with tiny 25-30t sprockets.

    actually, whadya know, they do make one! http://profileracing.com/products_mtb.php i think that if you want a cassette type hub instead of a freewheel, this is a much better way to go than taking a cassette made for 9 cogs or so and using it as a single speed.

  6. #6
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    All things being equal, the freewheel-based wheel will be stronger and have less dish. How much difference this will actually make depends on how hard you are on things, and how well your wheels are built. I have a ss bike with a derailer hanged, and when the stock wheels get trashed, I will be getting a freehub wheelset to replace it. This will geve me the option of a 1x9 setup down the road.

    I'd say use the stock wheelset until you trash it, then consider your options. And don't forget, with a ss, an internal geared hub is still an option for going geared on ss, as is using a saint rear deraileur.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle
    freewheel hubs have wider-set flanges. if i am not mistaken, this makes for a stronger wheel. using a freehub seems like a waste of space, having a dish a wheel and leave 1 1/2" inches on the side of your hub for no good reason other than the freehub body is made for multiple cogs when you are using only one.

    does anyone make a single-speed mtb cassette hub? being a bmx rider, i am used to these as i have a Profile hub with ti bits on my bmx bike. i suppose profile could make one, just space it wider and make bigger cogs for it. bmx riders tend to like the 9-10 one-piece drivers with tiny 25-30t sprockets.

    actually, whadya know, they do make one! http://profileracing.com/products_mtb.php i think that if you want a cassette type hub instead of a freewheel, this is a much better way to go than taking a cassette made for 9 cogs or so and using it as a single speed.
    There are LOTS of companies making SS freehubs for mountaunbikes. Names off the top of my head:

    Hope
    King
    DT Swiss
    Bontrager
    WTB
    Nashbar

    I'm sure there are more. These hubs have the same advantage of wider flange spacing you are talking about and build up into a stronger longer lasting wheel than using a 9 speed freehub. I prefer freehubs over freewheels for a few reasons: Much easier to change ratios and adjust chainline. There is also a much wider assortment of quality SS cogs than there are quality SS freewheels, of which there is exactly one.

    Mark

  8. #8
    Beware the Blackbuck!
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    + Hadley, true dishless.

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