View Poll Results: What frame and fork material do you SS on?

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  • Aluminum frame & suspension fork

    14 14.14%
  • Aluminum frame & carbon fork

    6 6.06%
  • Steel frame & fork

    38 38.38%
  • Steel frame & suspension fork

    17 17.17%
  • Steel frame & carbon fork

    15 15.15%
  • Ti frame & fork

    4 4.04%
  • Ti frame & suspension fork

    11 11.11%
  • Summin different

    12 12.12%
Multiple Choice Poll.
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Results 26 to 38 of 38
  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bike Whisperer View Post
    Jones Ti Spaceframe and fork...one off the shelf size
    Stand corrected. I always forget about him. Maybe because sells one size only...
    Last edited by Climber999; 11-20-2012 at 11:51 PM.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by longhaultrucker View Post
    I don't always have the choie as ch I prefer,sometimes I have to go with how the spinal issues are feeling (even if that means off the bike a month )
    Longhaultrucker what frame material have you found to be most forgiving/ back friendly?

  3. #28
    Mulleticious
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    So many more people use a steel fork (with steel frame) than a carbon fork.
    Do you think this a cost issue, or is the feel on your hands easier with steel? I have not used a steel fork SS rigid, as I always thought carbon was better at absorbing the trail chatter and so easier on the hands.

  4. #29
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    Reeb

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigwheelsRbest View Post
    So many more people use a steel fork (with steel frame) than a carbon fork.
    Do you think this a cost issue, or is the feel on your hands easier with steel? I have not used a steel fork SS rigid, as I always thought carbon was better at absorbing the trail chatter and so easier on the hands.
    Aidan Harding's wrote a good blog posting on steel vs,. carbon forks.
    A Tale Of Two Forks Aidan Harding

    What I would add is that there is a lot of really crappy materials coming out of China and other places with loose regulation so be careful. The label may say "steel" you may get pot metal. Some carbon products are low grade fibers and alloy quality is not very well regulated. The same is also true of aluminum alloys so in any class of material you can get a range of properties.

    Personally I generally ride a steel frame with suspension fork although often the fork is often in lockout mode because on a single speed it is nice to stand on the climbs.
    Last edited by febikes; 11-21-2012 at 05:05 AM.
    Mark Farnsworth, Raleigh, NC
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  6. #31
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    Ti Frame with steel forks.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigwheelsRbest View Post
    So many more people use a steel fork (with steel frame) than a carbon fork. Do you think this a cost issue, or is the feel on your hands easier with steel? I have not used a steel fork SS rigid, as I always thought carbon was better at absorbing the trail chatter and so easier on the hands.
    Cost is one consideration but more importantly, I like the flex of a steel fork on rough terrain as opposed to carbon. This is the case with Niner forks at least... dunno about others.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigwheelsRbest View Post
    So many more people use a steel fork (with steel frame) than a carbon fork.
    Do you think this a cost issue, or is the feel on your hands easier with steel? I have not used a steel fork SS rigid, as I always thought carbon was better at absorbing the trail chatter and so easier on the hands.
    I've owned several steel road bikes and have used both steel and carbon forks on them. The only advantage in the carbon IME is weight. Steel forks always ride better so I've always used them for rigid mountain bikes as well. But also, $100 vs $450 for a fork...yea cost might be a factor too.
    Former bicycle mechanic for 8 years, current soil scientist.

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  9. #34
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    I have ridden just about everything and I am not suprised that I am circling back to steel. For the money i was not that impressed with ti but the selling point for your forever bike was intriguing. 100 mile race on aluminum made me cringe. Carbon was sweet until i had a tip over on a sharp rock and it failed. Paid to have it fixed and then another low speed tip over in rocks and it was ruined again.

    Now i am looking for another high end steel frame. Good riddance carbon. Never again

  10. #35
    Mulleticious
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    Quote Originally Posted by febikes View Post
    Aidan Harding's wrote a good blog posting on steel vs,. carbon forks.
    A Tale Of Two Forks Aidan Harding

    What I would add is that there is a lot of really crappy materials coming out of China and other places with loose regulation so be careful. The label may say "steel" you may get pot metal. Some carbon products are low grade fibers and alloy quality is not very well regulated. The same is also true of aluminum alloys so in any class of material you can get a range of properties.

    Personally I generally ride a steel frame with suspension fork although often the fork is often in lockout mode because on a single speed it is nice to stand on the climbs.
    Yeah you're right about comparing steel to cheap carbon. But what about a Niner steel versus Niner carbon fork...? Hmmm. I wonder...

  11. #36
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    The material you ride is mostly about your personal style and regardless 95% of the performance of bikes comes from the rider rather then the material. Carbon is high tech so it is easy to hype and will sell well. I hear it also rides well. Aluminum, Ti, and steel all also ride well. At the same time bikes can be made that ride poorly out of any material so you can't really decide that one material is better then another.

    A good steel bike will be a lot better then a crappy carbon bike.

    Even at the high end it is not like one material is so much better then any other.

    For example, both the following single speed track bikes were raced head to head at the world championships. Both bikes were used for world records. One of them was steel and one of them was carbon. For bonus points, can you guess which of the following bikes was faster on the track?

    Lotus super bike:


    Old Faithful


    Steel, carbon, and aluminum have been used for a long time but it is not like the material wins the races. At the end of the day the material the bike is made out of won't make you faster or slower. What really maters most is fit and how the bike handles and works to support your personal riding style.
    Last edited by febikes; 11-21-2012 at 04:48 PM.
    Mark Farnsworth, Raleigh, NC
    http://farnsworthbikes.com

  12. #37
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    Carbon/carbon

  13. #38
    dirtbag
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    three in my garage:

    -aluminum/aluminum
    -steel/squishy
    -steel/carbon
    Amolan

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