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Thread: Fixed

  1. #1
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    Fixed

    Having played around on some short trails riding the mtb fixed for a while, I decided to do it for real. Spent some time with a carbide bit and drilled out an 18T on Friday night... mounted it up on the monocog with little trouble. Set it up 38:18 fixed, and 34x22 free on the flipside, removed the rear brake, and kept the front BB7. Technically, no longer a SS, but it works really well.

    Spent the day out Sunday with the family riding, and had lots of fun. Trails that were too easy/boring became a little more entertaining, and the 38:18 did a pretty good job up and down everything while not beating me up too badly. 30 miles of riding fixed off-road is quite a workout!

    It was really cool to get out on some real trails riding fixed. Just thought I'd share.

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    More of man than I could ever hope to be. Good on ya.

  3. #3
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    I've been riding fixed on the road on and off for years. Been trying to get the nerve to go fixed offroad for a while. A 16t Tomicog just arrived today. Think I will start with some mild trails. Thanks for posting!
    Without freedom of choice, there is no creativity. Without creativity, there is no life. The body dies.

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    Yeah... mild trails are about all I want to ride fixed right now. It wasn't too hard making the little step-ups and rolling/wheelie dropping the smaller rocks... but I kept the 34x22 free on the other side for anything more technical. It's funny, I thought the vertical aspect of the trail would be the hardest, but it wasn't. Watch the narrow bits.

  5. #5
    CB2
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    I rode fixed all Winter.
    Once you do it for a while, it becomes instinctive. You'll arch you rear wheel so you can clear stuff with your cranks.

  6. #6
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    What length cranks are you guys running? I have 180s on my singlespeed, but have always run 170s on my road fixie. Can you get away with 175s on an offroad fixie? And CB2, explain to us fixed neophytes what you mean by arching the rear wheel.
    Without freedom of choice, there is no creativity. Without creativity, there is no life. The body dies.

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    175s on my monocog... BB height is 11.5". No real problem with pedal strikes, just have to play the 2-3 move ahead mental chess game down the trail.

    I think CB2 means something akin to a "stoppie" or "nose manual" where you lift the rear off of the ground and coast on the front wheel. Of course, this would work best on flat or uphill, whereas you want to wheelie or manual to lift the BB when descending to keep weight back.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunset1123
    Having played around on some short trails riding the mtb fixed for a while, I decided to do it for real. Spent some time with a carbide bit and drilled out an 18T on Friday night... mounted it up on the monocog with little trouble. Set it up 38:18 fixed, and 34x22 free on the flipside, removed the rear brake, and kept the front BB7. Technically, no longer a SS, but it works really well.

    Spent the day out Sunday with the family riding, and had lots of fun. Trails that were too easy/boring became a little more entertaining, and the 38:18 did a pretty good job up and down everything while not beating me up too badly. 30 miles of riding fixed off-road is quite a workout!

    It was really cool to get out on some real trails riding fixed. Just thought I'd share.
    Curious why you say technically no longer a single speed? Because of the flip flop?

    I keep stating that the toughest part of fixed MTB is that muscle between your ears, your legs figure it our real quick if you just go do it. I really like the extra workout of fixed, especially through the winter when daylight is short.

    Quote Originally Posted by Drbbt
    What length cranks are you guys running? I have 180s on my singlespeed, but have always run 170s on my road fixie. Can you get away with 175s on an offroad fixie? And CB2, explain to us fixed neophytes what you mean by arching the rear wheel.
    I have 175mm on my On One 29er and am fine with them. As CB2 says, you learn to unweigh the rear wheel and position your cranks. Find a place with some small rocks and branches and practice, even a parking lot with tire bumpers will work. Work up the the bigger stuff.

    I find technical rocky descents surprise me how easy you can pick your way through, with having the ability to control your rear wheel with the fixed gear.

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  9. #9
    CB2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drbbt
    What length cranks are you guys running? I have 180s on my singlespeed, but have always run 170s on my road fixie. Can you get away with 175s on an offroad fixie? And CB2, explain to us fixed neophytes what you mean by arching the rear wheel.
    When you jump a log or rock or whatever, you pull the front end up and over it, and as you start pushing the bars back down your rear wheel follows the arch of the front wheel over the obstacle. When you rear wheel is in the air you can momentarily stop pedaling and put your cranks horizontal. Or you can do a little nose wheelie to get your cranks where you want them before you get to the obstacle. It's usually pretty instinctive.
    Sometimes you still smash a pedal.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by slocaus
    Curious why you say technically no longer a single speed? Because of the flip flop?
    A purist would note that it is actually a two speed bicycle. A fixed gear of around 55" for general use, and a freewheeling gear of 40" for technical/steep terrain.

    I've had my bike setup in some variation of this since the beginning (I think I started out with a 32 and 36 up front, and a 16 and 20 out back, both free). I usually don't shift during a ride, so it's just like riding a SS... there are a couple of the longer routes that I do make use of both gears just so I don't have to hike a bunch.

    Quote Originally Posted by slocaus
    I find technical rocky descents surprise me how easy you can pick your way through, with having the ability to control your rear wheel with the fixed gear.
    Hell yes... the ability to suddenly whip out a trackstand in the middle of a rock garden instead of bailing is definitely cool. I've been working on trials style repositioning hops too for just that scenario... they are a little different fixed.

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