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Thread: Don't be me.

  1. #1
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    Don't be me.

    I've had a very random popping noise since the day after Christmas on my bike. Long story short, I assumed it was my press fit bottom bracket.

    I replaced the bb and the sound was still there. I proceeded to spend half of the day trying a dozen different things with no success. I finally tried putting a chain whip on my cog to see if the sound was in the wheel or on my frame, and found it had something to do with the wheel.

    The chain whip felt weird going on the cog so I replaced it. Sound was gone. I guess 18 months is the life for a Wolf Tooth steel cog.

    Moral of the story, press fits suck, but check the obvious things first.

    Don't be me.

  2. #2
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    I think a lot of noise gets blamed on PF BB that shouldn't be...

  3. #3
    Ahhh the pain....
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    Surprised you wore it out... if the material is the same as what King uses, they last a long time. I have flipped them since they are symmetric to even out the wear.

  4. #4
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    I could have flipped it, but elected to replace it entirely since I've been having issues.

    I was kind of surprised myself. It doesn't look overly worn to me...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Don't be me.-20180113_120222.jpg  


  5. #5
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    I'm a little guilty of this too. I tend to let inspections go on the SS compared to the geared and run a chain longer than it should. When the reality may be that since I mash more on the SS, I should be paying more attention to my drivetrain.

    You could probably flip it, but perhaps you should file down the rounded edges beforehand.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  6. #6
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    Yeah, that looks pretty worn to me. Defiantly should flip or replace it before the burrs start developing. Depending on what chain you are using and how good your chain line is the burrs will prevent the chain from seating on the cog until it is forced down past the burr and then will impede the release of the chain both of which can be noisy. I would bet the chain is at the end of its life too.

  7. #7
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    Time to upgrade to a Niner Ti cog
    Ripping trails and tipping ales

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vader View Post
    Time to upgrade to a Niner Ti cog
    Yup.....6000 miles on mine and it still looks nearly new.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbikej View Post
    Yup.....6000 miles on mine and it still looks nearly new.
    Interesting... I have always wondered if they were worth it. I have never used anything but the Surly cogs. May have to spring for a Ti.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbikej View Post
    Yup.....6000 miles on mine and it still looks nearly new.
    God dang! I've always overlooked Ti as an overpriced, overhyped metal but it is hard to argue with 6 times the life of my Wolf Tooth.

    I may have to try one.

  11. #11
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    Niner Ti Cogs are on sale now for $77. Sounds like the time to buy. Might have to pick one up.

  12. #12
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    I went with a niner ti on a bike I built recently. Inspected it last weekend, and after around 500 miles I can't see any signs of use.

    Their ti cog is an entire kit with spacers and lockring. Wish they'd sell just the cog.

  13. #13
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    Even steel cogs will wear faster when the chain stretches. What are you using for a chain? And did you replace it when you replaced the cog?

  14. #14
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    I use Chris King and never had one wear out as of yet.

  15. #15
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    Also curious about what chain was used.

    I check my chains often, and I bought reinvested in steel cogs recently so I can flip them.
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  16. #16
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    I had a similar issue, ignored it for several months...turns out the carbon crank arm was cracked and was making a popping noise. This of Corse is after replacing ebb bearings and ring/cog/chain. Love my $$

  17. #17
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    Strange to hear ti recommended. On every partial-ti road cassette I've ever used (Record and Dura-Ace), the ti cogs always go before the steel. And they are the largest... less frequently used and more chain wrap (= more load distribution) should result in less wear.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by dookie View Post
    Strange to hear ti recommended. On every partial-ti road cassette I've ever used (Record and Dura-Ace), the ti cogs always go before the steel. And they are the largest... less frequently used and more chain wrap (= more load distribution) should result in less wear.
    This conversation is about singlespeed cogs on mountain bikes. I don't think you can compare the two.

    And for the record, I still blame the PF BB. It's the reason you weren't looking in the right spot.
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  19. #19
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    Softer metal is still softer, eh?

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbhammercycle View Post
    ...You could probably flip it, but perhaps you should file down the rounded edges beforehand.
    I would never buy another cog of a make that burred over like that. The material is far too soft.

    The old fashioned cogs were the appropriate steel and heat treated for the purpose and did not deform like that.
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  21. #21
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    I'd send that in for a warranty replacement.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    And for the record, I still blame the PF BB. It's the reason you weren't looking in the right spot.
    Ah, I like this!

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    I'd send that in for a warranty replacement.
    Nobody will warranty a cog that wore out from a stretched chain. And that is what we have here.

    Also, Ti is a softer metal than steel, so it will wear out faster. Especially when you wrap a worn out chain around it.

  24. #24
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    My chain was never stretched. Checked with a gauge before I replaced everything.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by solo-x View Post

    Also, Ti is a softer metal than steel, so it will wear out faster.
    that was my experience back in the boone days. i spent 80 bucks and it wore out quicker than a cheapo steel cog. i love ti but i wouldn't spring for high wear item like a cog.

    steel is usually real for cogs but that one looked soft.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by solo-x View Post
    Nobody will warranty a cog that wore out from a stretched chain. And that is what we have here.

    Also, Ti is a softer metal than steel, so it will wear out faster. Especially when you wrap a worn out chain around it.
    No, what we have is an improperly manufactured cog that is too soft.

    I understand wearing something out is not cause for a warranty claim.

    But when you boast your cog is steel and it deforms like butter, that is a warranty claim.

  27. #27
    eri
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    No, what we have is an improperly manufactured cog that is too soft.

    I understand wearing something out is not cause for a warranty claim.

    But when you boast your cog is steel and it deforms like butter, that is a warranty claim.
    I agree too, look how the tooth faces are squished! Maybe find a machine shop to do a hardness test?

    I'm still using an endless 23t aluminum cog, more than 2k miles and no wear.

    Wolf does say it's 416 which is softer cheaper metal but I suspect they messed up.
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  28. #28
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    Tempered 416 stainless is easily machined. You'd typically harden it after the machining is done. 7075-T6 has a Brinell hardness of 150, while tempered 416 has a Brinell hardness of 248. So even if they forgot to harden it, it should have still outlasted an aluminum cog.

  29. #29
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    It's a $60 cog that lasted a season and a half. I've replaced it with a Surly and life is good again.

    Not worth the effort to me to pursue a warranty on a wear item (whether deserving or not, it's going to be a battle) and testing hardness.

    I appreciate everyone's input though.

  30. #30
    eri
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shinkers View Post
    It's a $60 cog that lasted a season and a half. I've replaced it with a Surly and life is good again.

    Not worth the effort to me to pursue a warranty on a wear item (whether deserving or not, it's going to be a battle) and testing hardness.

    I appreciate everyone's input though.
    Sorry to revive the thread, was in the back of my head. I just replaced my broken crank, different (size) front chainring so swapped rear cog. Cog and chanrng are both aluminum. I've got wear for sure, especially the rear cog, but no smushed tooth edges. My riding weight is 205 or so, lots of grungy low cadence climbing.

    Looking more carefully a pic above it looks like you have a bent tooth? The one after the 'L'? Bent towards the camera? Is it possible something sproinged your chain? Do you recall an event where your drive like got wedged and your pedals wanted to spring back? A stick? Bad chainline? Because it's serious force to deform a tooth face like that, way above riding force.
    Last edited by eri; 05-03-2018 at 08:51 AM. Reason: MInor clarification

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