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  1. #1
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    Do you ride clipless or flats?

    Just wondering if you prefer flats or clipless for SS and why?

  2. #2
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    Clipless. I went clipless early last year and bought my SS this year. So it's natural for me at this point.

    I really don't know how I'd manage some of the steeper climbs with flats. It may be cheating, but I do tend to pull up when the going gets grindy. Further more, I also find that it's nice to change from normal pedaling to more of a pull as my legs get tired. Uses different parts of the muscle, or maybe I'm just telling myself that, but it works for me!
    SS ==> Nut up or Shut up!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cormac View Post
    Clipless.

    I really don't know how I'd manage some of the steeper climbs with flats. It may be cheating, but I do tend to pull up when the going gets grindy. Further more, I also find that it's nice to change from normal pedaling to more of a pull as my legs get tired. Uses different parts of the muscle, or maybe I'm just telling myself that, but it works for me!
    Ditto!

  4. #4
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    how many "clipless vs platforms" threads do we need?

    I don't mean to be rude, but this topic has been discussed to death and you can find tons of past discussions with a simple search.
    Last edited by mack_turtle; 06-03-2013 at 06:00 AM.

  5. #5
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    Clipless for da hills!
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  6. #6
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    Flats. With spiky spike teeths on them.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    how many "clipless vs platforms" threads do we need?
    More apparently. I just switched from Shimano XT to Look S-Tracks. So far, so good.
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  8. #8
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    I tried clipless on my SS for a few weeks. I liked it for pedaling but I took a few falls and decided that I'm fine with my Forte Convert pedals and 5.10 shoes. I'll stick to clipless on my roadbike for sure though.

  9. #9
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    Flats.

    I've been riding clipless on my road bike for over a year now and I still feel somewhat inhibited by them. I feel a lot more "free" with flats when I'm out on the SS exploring new locations. Maybe at some point I'll go with clipless, but for now I'm happy.

  10. #10
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    Clipless. I'm just used to it. A little extra power to make it up some steeper uphills, and I don't get bounced off of the pedals on the washboard sections (matter of skill. I know, I know). I think I have a few mm more ground clearance against the old flat pedals that I have.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  11. #11
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    Clipless hère...

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  12. #12
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    Clipless on everything for over a decade.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    how many "clipless vs platforms" threads do we need?
    a LOT of 'em!


    Quote Originally Posted by michaelscott View Post
    Flats. With spiky spike teeths on them.
    Agree wholeheartedly.
    Bring it.

  14. #14
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    Both depends on how I feel that day. Currently have flats mounted up.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by AnonymouseTech View Post
    I tried clipless on my SS for a few weeks. I liked it for pedaling but I took a few falls and decided that I'm fine with my Forte Convert pedals and 5.10 shoes. I'll stick to clipless on my roadbike for sure though.
    Thats funny I won't go clipless on my road bike for 3 reasons:

    #1. (most importantly) falling on pavement f*ing hurts!

    #2. I don't want to spend the money on yet another pair of pedals/shoes, especially when I ride the road far less than MTB.

    #3. I might like to use my road bike as a form of transportation form time to time and can't be bothered to have to take a change of shoes along.
    SS ==> Nut up or Shut up!

  16. #16
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    Clipless. Don't see a good reason to go any other way.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cormac View Post
    Thats funny I won't go clipless on my road bike for 3 reasons:

    #1. (most importantly) falling on pavement f*ing hurts!

    #2. I don't want to spend the money on yet another pair of pedals/shoes, especially when I ride the road far less than MTB.

    #3. I might like to use my road bike as a form of transportation form time to time and can't be bothered to have to take a change of shoes along.
    Some thoughts...

    #1 - If you unclip first, you won't fall down. This has worked for me.

    #2 - I ride Time ATAC XS pedals on my road and cx bike so I can just wear my regular mtb shoes.

    #3 - You got me on this one ...

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  18. #18
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    ^ true on unclipping first so yo don't fall, I was referring to crashing. Suppose I should have chose different wording. Though both times I went down last year even with flats I still lost skin. So I guess my argument is void.
    SS ==> Nut up or Shut up!

  19. #19
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    *Monocog rigid 29er*
    Clipless has completely changed my ability to climb super steep/bumpy hills. Being able to lift and press makes all the difference.

    Descending on rocks has become much easier because my feet dont slip off the pedals (I don't have 5.10s though)

    Once you have trained your muscle memory to clip out, you wont have any problems.

  20. #20
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    spank/spike flats and I love em, no more sore feet as they have a nice wide platform. Also have flats on road bike which I do not ride often. Funny, tonight I put clipless on the road bike and when I hit some loose stuff I automatically tried to move my foot to compensate for balance. Could not do it because of the clips. Flats went back on as soon as I got home. It's been 3 years since I rode clipless and I am climbing everything I used to on clips. 5/10's or equivalent are a must.
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  21. #21
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    Flats! I love my Crampon C2 flats. I have yet to clip a rock and yet to loose my footing.

  22. #22
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    Some food for thought...

    Which Muscles are Really Used During the Pedal Stroke? - Pinkbike

    Lee Likes Bikes

    Lee Likes Bikes

    http://www.bikejames.com/strength/th...h-flat-pedals/

    Many trainers are starting to suggest using flats for training and clipless for race day for that little extra edge. The notion is that clipless can teach bad form and technique as you rely on the pedal to pull up on, to help bunny hop and to keep your feet in a circular motion. Our legs are designed to push rather than pull and many often "strengthen" the wrong muscles missing out on the right one's when using strictly clips for training. Many are not driving into the pedal stroke with their hips like they should.

    Using a "quality" flat pedal with a "quality" shoe can come very close to clipless when pedaled correctly and can teach and enhance proper pedaling motion.

    I rode clipless pedals for many years but all of my bikes have flats now and I don't feel I'm missing much and I have more fun.

    I recently convinced a long time clipless only (never tried flats ever) friend to try good shoe/pedal flat combo and after a few rides he admitted that only felt he loss a touch of power on the climbs (probably mostly bad form) and that the flat and rolling hills were the same, but his downhill times have dropped and he's admitted to having much more fun and the hitting more jumps and bigger on the downhills.

    I think both have their place, but many are relying on them to help with bad form rather than enhance a good pedaling technique.

  23. #23
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    Thanks for the great info rideorange525,...I just learned a thing or 3!!!
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  24. #24
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    I prefer flats because my riding style is pump, jump, and drift. I also prefer 26 inch wheels!!!

    But when it comes time to race especially xc I'm clipped and on a 29er for most courses.

    DH and Enduro I'm still rocking flats on a 26 inch, it's much easier for me to send it. I get more pop, and feel I can lay the bike into the berms better. I'm glad I ride both!!

  25. #25
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    Flats. Will never use clipless.

    Used to run toe clips so I wouldn't bounce off on rocky stuff, but realized I had bad technique (thx to Lee and Brian's book) and changed to "heavy on the feet, light on the hands". Fully rigid SS now, no bouncing off at all.


    Edit from Lee's website in the link above:
    "If you have a terrible stroke, clips will help you stay attached to the pedals and possibly make more power"

    Kinda really says it all...
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  26. #26
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    +1 rideorange52. interesting reads.
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  27. #27
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    Both.

    I prefer flats when I'm out riding to have fun, because I sometimes get tossed out of my bike while jumping or carving some dirt, and clipless are the last thing I want.

    I prefer clipless when I'm out riding just because I wanted to be outside riding. I don't bother to launch myself every chance I get, I just ride, because, well, my body can't take punishment like I used to 15 years ago on a dirt bike.

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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cormac View Post
    Thats funny I won't go clipless on my road bike for 3 reasons:

    #1. (most importantly) falling on pavement f*ing hurts!

    #2. I don't want to spend the money on yet another pair of pedals/shoes, especially when I ride the road far less than MTB.

    #3. I might like to use my road bike as a form of transportation form time to time and can't be bothered to have to take a change of shoes along.
    #1. Unclip one foot before stopping (as mentioned previously), or trackstand, EVERYWHERRRRRRRRE! As you develop the ability, it gets easier to stay upright on all grades, even downhill ones. I rarely clip out on road/city rides for this reason.

    #2. Then don't. Like SPP, I use Time mountain pedals on mountain bikes and my everyday cyclocross ride, although I have Giros and FiveTens to use with either.

    #3. Use mountain shoes. Recessed cleat = walkability. If I do have to walk long distances between stints on the ride, my Converse go in my backpack, which I habitually wear.

  29. #29
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    CLipless Crank Brothers for more control and power. They are like ski bindings for my bikes...road and mtb. Buy some high quality shoes and clipless pedals.
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  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackgriffen_1 View Post
    #1. Unclip one foot before stopping (as mentioned previously), or trackstand, EVERYWHERRRRRRRRE! As you develop the ability, it gets easier to stay upright on all grades, even downhill ones. I rarely clip out on road/city rides for this reason.

    #2. Then don't. Like SPP, I use Time mountain pedals on mountain bikes and my everyday cyclocross ride, although I have Giros and FiveTens to use with either.

    #3. Use mountain shoes. Recessed cleat = walkability. If I do have to walk long distances between stints on the ride, my Converse go in my backpack, which I habitually wear.
    I rode flats for years and resisted clipless for a long time when I came back to MTB...now I love me some clipless.

    1) Totally agree!

    2) Agree but I like Crank Brothers....ride whatever clipless you like, this is a whole nother debate.

    3) Agree, but I just walk with my MTB shoes.

    Last edited by Natedogz; 06-10-2013 at 05:59 PM.
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  31. #31
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    Clipped. No other way. First thing i look footer on other bikers is clips. Clips = serious. Chuck tailors=noob Aside from obvious pedal power is more a safety issue. There is no easy to fall off/slip off. I can go into much more difficult sections without fear. Do much more bike control too. Bunny hop, front tire up, back tire up, hop sideways, swing back end around, so much maneuverability. If you want to put your foot down then stay on the pavement... Ride clipped in and it turns your bike into a machine. I would not feel comfortable riding a tricycle with flats. Yea sure, you will fall over at a dead stop the first week... So what? Better than slipping off on a fast technical section. Like i said for me it's a safety issue.

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  32. #32
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    +1 clipless. +1 for crank bros eggbeaters. Have tons of confidence with these. And any falls (or potential falls), my feet pop out fairly easily.

    I agree with TheRoweSho - I don't think I would feel near as confident hitting trails as I do with flats. And I have been riding for a pretty long time, so I think my skills are fairly well honed, even though there is always room for improvement. Although I have also never ridden flats, so I can't really say that I for sure would feel less confident, I am just speculating.

    I think that for me, clipless makes even more sense for the SS. There are plenty of climbs and tech sections that I am glad I have had them for the touch of extra effort from the pulling stroke. Otherwise I would have been walking.

    And maybe this is going back to neighborhood bike riding as a kid, but I would rather avoid getting smacked in the shin with a flat pedal, especially one with spikes (ouch!).

    And for the record, I ride mostly XC type trails in the Southeast, though I have seen my fair share of techie sections.

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  33. #33
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    Clipless for me. Besides my personal (anecdotal) preference in terms of climbing steep slopes, I note that I've still not yet lost to a guy riding flats in any x-c or endurance race. Yeah, there are plenty out there who could beat me riding a bike straight out of Walmart wearing flip-flops, but the point is the young guns using flat pedals just aren't ahead of me at the end of the race.

    I don't understand/agree with "Lee's" conclusion about getting to the same sprint power using flats as clipless. In my road days I was an okay to better than average sprinter and nothing allows you to "jump" (accelerate) like a foot locked onto a pedal and being able to pull on the up-stroke (we laced straps to the clipless pedal to assure we were locked in for primes and the finish). I think crushing a steep climb on a SS is a lot like a road sprint -- and since you're locked into one gear it's a lot more likely that on a tough uphill you're cadence is low and keeping the pedals turning is going to require both stomping down with one leg while pulling up hard with the other. If I'm out of the saddle on a climb my pedal stroke feels different compared to pedaling seated -- lots more pulling up, and that's not possible using flats. YMMV.

    (edit: I think going with flats on a geared bike makes more sense, where you can control your cadence and not have it dictated by the terrain.)
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  34. #34
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    Whatever works (your mileage may vary; tastes great / less filling)...

    For me: clipless on all four of my bikes (SS rigid 29er included). I scurry up trail climbs that my MTB cronies can't and I have taller gearing (34x15 as opposed to 32x17/18 or me running 34x18 and them 32/20+ on trails with bigger elevation gain). I attribute the added climbing success to my pulling the pedal technique.

    Another reason I ride clipless is that my feet tend to wander when I am exhausted during endurance races or all day rides. Being clipped in keeps my feet in the same location, with the same pedaling efficiency.

    Finally, I prefer being clipped in on long/steep/technical descents where having my foot unexpectedly slip or get bounced off of a platform pedal would be disastrous.

  35. #35
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    Clipless for about 7ish years now. However, for the commute, especially in winter, I use shoes I would wear at work or boots for the cold. I have what I would term as clipless trainers, one side flat the other clippless, for whatever bike I would ride to work. If I'm going for a ride and not to a destination, clipless always.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheRoweShow View Post
    First thing i look footer on other bikers is clips. Clips = serious. Chuck tailors=noob
    Really? You do realize, right, that any poser with deep enough pockets can rock the latest "shoe-pedal system", but riding well in flats takes real skill - especially jumping. There's a reason BMXer's call it "credit card air" if you bunny hop clipped in. I'd say judge a guy or girl by how they ride, not what kind of pedals they choose to run.
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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by bolandjd View Post
    Really? You do realize, right, that any poser with deep enough pockets can rock the latest "shoe-pedal system", but riding well in flats takes real skill - especially jumping. There's a reason BMXer's call it "credit card air" if you bunny hop clipped in. I'd say judge a guy or girl by how they ride, not what kind of pedals they choose to run.
    This.

    Some of the best riders I've seen ride platform pedals with full control of their bikes. There is a reason why I decided to ride with clipless pedals. lol.
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  38. #38
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    A safety issue...indeed good Sir

    Quote Originally Posted by TheRoweShow View Post
    Clipped. No other way. First thing i look footer on other bikers is clips. Clips = serious. Chuck tailors=noob Aside from obvious pedal power is more a safety issue. There is no easy to fall off/slip off. I can go into much more difficult sections without fear. Do much more bike control too. Bunny hop, front tire up, back tire up, hop sideways, swing back end around, so much maneuverability. If you want to put your foot down then stay on the pavement... Ride clipped in and it turns your bike into a machine. I would not feel comfortable riding a tricycle with flats. Yea sure, you will fall over at a dead stop the first week... So what? Better than slipping off on a fast technical section. Like i said for me it's a safety issue.

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    Absolutely right...it's a safety issue. 25 years ago when I cartwheeled my ATK (motocross bike) with my right foot in the frame and went through 3 reconstructive surgeries on my right ankle to have a foot at all, my doctor at the Mayo Clinic (Thanks again Dr, Miguel Cabanela!! my hero) I was given at most a 7 year use of an ankle with 30% ROM (range of motion) before it destroyed itself and I would have to have it fused and have no ankle at all...25 years later on the same p.o.'ed stiff, poorly mobile ankle, I ride flats and hi-top chucks because they have proven to be good, can be tightly laced and braced, and light around my ankle and with good flats...I don't slip and I get to go riding and that "first week fall" stuff you mentioned? That would be the fall or two that render my poorly working at best ankle totally useless. Shoes really are a poor gauge of a "noob or not" I'm well over 35 years into this and I'm no noob. When it's REALLY messing with me, I lace it up even tighter in a pair of Docs and ride so nee-ner-nee-ner.

    Flats all the way...for safety. Have a great ride!

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  39. #39
    I have Flat Pedal shame.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheRoweShow View Post
    Clipped. No other way. First thing i look footer on other bikers is clips. Clips = serious. Chuck tailors=noob Aside from obvious pedal power is more a safety issue. There is no easy to fall off/slip off. I can go into much more difficult sections without fear. Do much more bike control too. Bunny hop, front tire up, back tire up, hop sideways, swing back end around, so much maneuverability. If you want to put your foot down then stay on the pavement... Ride clipped in and it turns your bike into a machine. I would not feel comfortable riding a tricycle with flats. Yea sure, you will fall over at a dead stop the first week... So what? Better than slipping off on a fast technical section. Like i said for me it's a safety issue.
    So, I am not flaming... just using this as an example.

    There are two very different schools of thought and riding styles with riding flats or clipless. Flat user know how to keep their center of gravity low (on the pedals) which makes them much more stable and less likely to wreck. It also gives them the ability to do more advanced technical areas and take more chances and have more confidence on the trail.

    Clipless users, i have observed, have simply accepted wrecking as a part of mountain biking. Because of the percieved "increased efficiency" (which doesn't make you any faster or climb any better, btw) of pulling up on the back stroke, they have raised their center of gravity much higher and towards the front of the bike. More body weight on the front leads to much more unstable riding, which leads to increased wrecking. The number 1 comment I have heard from people trying to convince me to go clipless (I ride flats with Chuck Taylors also) is "I never have a problem unclipping when I wreck." as they show me this god-awful awkward foot twisting move to try and get out of their pedals. No thank you.

    To end on a positive note: I rode with a friend yesterday who has tried to convince me for 2 years to go clipless (with all the usual arguments). We were going slowly on a relatively easy trail. After the FOURTH time he wrecked, I finally said "Hey, maybe you should try flats pedals so you can put your foot down."
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  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeT View Post
    I don't understand/agree with "Lee's" conclusion about getting to the same sprint power using flats as clipless.
    You have to take the whole article and others into consideration. The idea is that "pulling up" is not how your body is designed to work and that you may be achieving equal or more power than with flats, but that is using a bad technique and usually not working many of the muscles you should be using to push (eg. hips). If you practice with flats as Lee did and concentrate on proper technique and build all the muscles you "should" be using you will much more power.

    Most can spin the tire on any climb, so clips and pulling is just more chance of spinning or wheeling out.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thustlewhumber View Post
    So, I am not flaming... just using this as an example.

    There are two very different schools of thought and riding styles with riding flats or clipless. Flat user know how to keep their center of gravity low (on the pedals) which makes them much more stable and less likely to wreck. It also gives them the ability to do more advanced technical areas and take more chances and have more confidence on the trail.

    Clipless users, i have observed, have simply accepted wrecking as a part of mountain biking. Because of the percieved "increased efficiency" (which doesn't make you any faster or climb any better, btw) of pulling up on the back stroke, they have raised their center of gravity much higher and towards the front of the bike. More body weight on the front leads to much more unstable riding, which leads to increased wrecking. The number 1 comment I have heard from people trying to convince me to go clipless (I ride flats with Chuck Taylors also) is "I never have a problem unclipping when I wreck." as they show me this god-awful awkward foot twisting move to try and get out of their pedals. No thank you.

    To end on a positive note: I rode with a friend yesterday who has tried to convince me for 2 years to go clipless (with all the usual arguments). We were going slowly on a relatively easy trail. After the FOURTH time he wrecked, I finally said "Hey, maybe you should try flats pedals so you can put your foot down."
    I believe you're very much pigeonholing different pedal users into subjective categories.

    I've ridden with DJ and downhill riders that have all the control in the world on flat pedals, but I've also ridden with people that can do the same lines on clipless systems without crashing. If you can't ride tech lines, you won't be able to ride tech lines with a different pedal. On the same sub-topic, weighting fore/aft on the bike is not solely a pedal problem, it's more down to rider form.

    Swapping back to flats highlighted what I was doing wrong with my pedal technique, but even then I remember not dropping my heels correctly and still not having any problems on extremely rough trails. HOWEVER, once I became aware of how I could change my overall form, I now ride the same on flats or clipped in.

    So, my takeaway is this: people can become complacent regardless of what equipment they ride, so claiming that one system will make any rider inherently better is clearly a falsehood.

    Lastly,the "god-awful awkward foot twisting move" becomes muscle memory very quickly for some. Others struggle for years with it. It's gotten to the point where, if I'm riding platforms and I need to stop and take a foot off, my heel goes first. Anyone that can't do this when they have the physical ability to do so, just needs to ride more. In the end, don't we all just need to ride more??

  42. #42
    local trails rider
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    Where's the popcorn smiley?

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  43. #43
    puts the FU in fun
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    Why can't I use both again?

    I prefer clipless for XC rides because I'm used to them and they seem to make climbing and bunny hopping over obstacles easier. Plus I usually end up hamburgering my shins when I use spiky flats. I enjoy using flats when exploring really techy terrain, playing trials rider or messing around on city rides. It doesn't take that long to swap out pedals...
    Everything in moderation. Including moderation.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by CuzinMike View Post
    Why can't I use both again?

    I prefer clipless for XC rides because I'm used to them and they seem to make climbing and bunny hopping over obstacles easier. Plus I usually end up hamburgering my shins when I use spiky flats. I enjoy using flats when exploring really techy terrain, playing trials rider or messing around on city rides. It doesn't take that long to swap out pedals...
    There is no reason not to have/use both, they both have their places.

    -Learning to bunny hop w/ flats will help you do it better.

    -Wearing quality shoes like 5.10s and weighting your body neutral will greatly help w/ shin bites. They are usually caused by no grippy enough shoes or light weight on pedals.

    I think having proper and honed technique with the addition of clips can take you to the next level.

  45. #45
    cowbell
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    Quote Originally Posted by rideorange525 View Post

    I think having proper and honed technique with the addition of clips can take you to the next level.
    That. I learned to ride a mountain bike (properly) before clipless existed. I still use proper technique, but I ride clipless basically all the time.

    Interestingly enough, for those who think people who ride clipless are crashers, with the group of people I ride with (many of whom use flats) I have a reputation of being the guy who never crashes. And the one time anyone DID see me crash, I went down still clipped in, because it happend so fast. If I'd been riding flats, it still would have happened, and my feet still would have been on the flats when I hit the ground too. People who ride clipless aren't crashers. People who can't ride are crashers.

    Also, as far as power and using correct muscles - yes, it can cause incorrect form. But pulling against a correct powerful push can give you some extra power. And that power can be used - it's about how you work the bike, dynamics. I have tires I won't run on the front (or rear) of my other bikes that I run on the rear of my SS because I so rarely spin it out.

    As for spinning out any tire or wheelieing with the "extra power" from clipless, I'd say just the opposite - rather than using the extra power, you want to be smoothing out the power you're making with it. It is much easier to peddle smoothly up a hill with clipless than flats. Notice I'm not saying it's impossible to put power down smoothly with flats, I said it's easier with clipless. And regardless of which peddle you ride, if you put power down smoothly on a climb, you can put more power down without breaking traction or doing a wheelie.

    Bottom line, people ask me about clipless all the time. I tell them I wouldn't have it any other way, but you have to ride what's comfortable for you. Some people will never develop the confidence to ride with their feet clipped in. Other people will never understand how you can ride flats without your feet flying off the peddles. I tell everyone who asks to do what ever is comfortable, because in the end, all the matters is that you RIDE THE BIKE and ENJOY IT. I've never had anyone tell me I gave them bad advice regarding peddles.

  46. #46
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    Every advantage of flats can be an even bigger advantage with clipless except putting your foot down. I don't see many single track Red Bull videos of guys putting their foot down.

    Sent from my XT907 using Tapatalk 4 Beta

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cotharyus View Post
    As for spinning out any tire or wheelieing with the "extra power" from clipless, I'd say just the opposite - rather than using the extra power, you want to be smoothing out the power you're making with it. It is much easier to peddle smoothly up a hill with clipless than flats.
    My point is with a good technique the clipless is not going to smooth out your pedal stroke, your technique is. You don't have to be able to pull up to pedal smooth.

    I rode clipless on everything but my DJ bikes for 10+ years, a couple years ago I started riding more again and started with clipless, but after trying out flats for a while I liked them more for their advantages and over fun "I" get from riding flats.

    If you want to change the angle of your foot in a tight corner clips can pop out, flats I can move on and no chance of popping off. - (doesn't happen often but has happened to me)

    On jumps, especially larger ones, if you use bad technique and use the pedal to pull up on or you throw the bike out to the side a little too much to line up the next corner the clips can pop out. - (I've had my foot pop out of my SPD while I'm 4-5' in the air with the rear end 3' to the right, it was all I could do to get the bike back straight and my foot back on the pedal which was now not clipped in and slipped off on landing)

    As for getting out, in all my years of clipless riding I only didn't get my foot out one time and it was when I looped a wheelie while playing around on a walking bridge. too funny!

    I don't care what anyone rides as long as they are having fun! My posts are to share some of the research I've found on "proper technique" so you develop the "correct" muscles and don't do harm to your body.

    Now get out there!

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