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  1. #1
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    Do you ever carry extra cogs when riding unknow trails?

    Does anyone carry extra cogs and tools to change your gearing mid-ride when heading out on unknown trails so you don't end up being in a miserable situation either unable to climb most of the hills or just spinning out the whole time?

    I know ss gearing finding the best balance but if you're on a trail that's best suited for a 48" gear and you're riding 51", that would suck and visa versa.

  2. #2
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    No. Run what ya brung!

  3. #3
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    That's part of single speeding. If you're carrying extra cogs, you're riding geared.

    Nothing wrong with that, though. But I've never carried any extra cogs personally.

  4. #4
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    Well that would involve carrying a chain whip, cog tool, and wrench to change it out...more than I would ever carry on the trail.

    Personally I gear low and just deal with being slower on the flats anyway.
    Former bicycle mechanic for 8 years, current soil scientist.

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  5. #5
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    No reason to carry. You can always walk the hills and cost the downhills. If you are going to an area you are nervous about just run a lighter gear.
    Mark Farnsworth, Raleigh, NC
    http://farnsworthbikes.com

  6. #6
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    If you do want to change gears on the trail or in the shop using no special tools, we have the perfect cog for you. All you need is a small knife, screwdriver, or even a strong fingernail to quickly change the cog. And the cog ends up being lighter too if you wanted to carry one with you.

    Lunar Bikes - Single Speed Cogs


  7. #7
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    I run the same gear everywhere. The only reason I could ever imagine changing my gearing is if I were planning to ride somewhere really flat. But that would be "prairie biking" not "mountain biking" and it doesn't sound like fun anyway.

  8. #8
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    Those are awesome. Thnx for the info.

  9. #9
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    Taco....that's a neat little system. How do you get the metal clips off to change the cog?

  10. #10
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    No gear changes.on the trail. On multi-day trips it is allowed to change gearing between the rides though.

    That lunar cog looks nice, but gearclamp seems easier to me (never tried one though)
    Ride more!

  11. #11
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    If you find you need to change your cogs out often, there is this neat invention called a derailer. It lets you change you cogs without getting off the bike or even stopping.

    Its basically like having a single speed, with a lot of cogs with you whenever you need them.

  12. #12
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    Nope.

    Like everyone else said.

    SPP
    Rigid.

  13. #13
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    I don't do this, been running the same gear for years, but I could see leaving the cog and tools in your car and swapping after a lap or something if you really had no idea what to expect. Personally if still ask around or read trail reviews and gear low at first if I wasn't sure
    Mountain bikers who don't road ride have no legs...
    Road riders who don't mountain bike have no soul...

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by TacoMan View Post
    If you do want to change gears on the trail or in the shop using no special tools, we have the perfect cog for you. All you need is a small knife, screwdriver, or even a strong fingernail to quickly change the cog. And the cog ends up being lighter too if you wanted to carry one with you.

    Lunar Bikes - Single Speed Cogs

    Very cool product...but I still am a firm believer in:

    Quote Originally Posted by jetboy23 View Post
    No. Run what ya brung!
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by fotu View Post
    If you find you need to change your cogs out often, there is this neat invention called a derailer. It lets you change you cogs without getting off the bike or even stopping.

    Its basically like having a single speed, with a lot of cogs with you whenever you need them.
    You beat me to it. Run what ya brung or buy shifty bits and ride geared.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tone's View Post
    Id scrap the passion forum all together, its a breeding ground for unicorn milkers, rainbow chasers and candy cotton farters.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by 88 rex View Post
    Taco....that's a neat little system. How do you get the metal clips off to change the cog?
    It uses a Spirolox retaining ring. These are thin rings the spiral around twice inside the groove. Unlike snap rings that require snap ring pliers, these can be removed with just a small screwdriver or knife. There is a small relief on the end of the ring to insert a tool. Once you get the ring started with a tool, it can be easily unwound by hand. Installation requires no tools at all, just your fingers.

    The 2-piece design of this cog system is to allow for easily changing cogs without using special tools. Once the wide base aluminum driver is installed on your cassette, it never needs to be removed again.

    We have a lot of descriptions for the many benefits of this system over a regular cog on our website. But basically it allows for us to use a very high quality heated stainless steel for the cog which reduces the cost of the cogs since it is not machined from a thicker piece of material like Chris King's cogs. So you get a stronger cog for less than 1/2 the price.

    Since it is so easy and inexpensive to switch cogs, you can fine tune your gearing for each ride.

  17. #17
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    I didn't say I wanted to change gear "often" or on any common ride. I'm saying, if you head out to unknown territory to a trail you've never riden or really know little about, do you leave yourself the option to gear appropriately for that difference from what you usually ride? I don't know where you guys are from, but here there are HUGE differences from one trail to another.

    I really like that Lunar Bike cog - especially since I recently moved to a new area and will need to take some time finding my sweet spot gear for my new SS.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by sprocket47 View Post
    I didn't say I wanted to change gear "often" or on any common ride. I'm saying, if you head out to unknown territory to a trail you've never riden or really know little about, do you leave yourself the option to gear appropriately for that difference from what you usually ride? I don't know where you guys are from, but here there are HUGE differences from one trail to another.

    I really like that Lunar Bike cog - especially since I recently moved to a new area and will need to take some time finding my sweet spot gear for my new SS.
    I don't have a sweet spot gear. My single speed is in the wrong gear 99.9% of the time.

  19. #19
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    One more note about the Quick-Cog. We are also releasing a bomb proof single speed hub. It will use a 30mm axle, heavy-duty large diameter 88 POE ratchet system, and features a oversized cassette with the same spline pattern of the quick-cog, which will mount directly to the cassette without the driver. The black aluminum driver shown in the picture above is to install our Quick-Cog on standard size cassettes.

  20. #20
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    I just ordered a smaller cog to use on the road till I get my SS commuter put together. I may even ride my G29 in street mode to a couple trails near my house (4-6 miles each way depending on trail) then swap cogs to attack the hills. I have ridden to the trails spinning like mad & getting some strange looks along the way. I do agree though that if you want to change gears out on the trail you should just ride a geared bike.

  21. #21
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    changing cogs is too much work
    I run what I brought


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    Last edited by Burnt-Orange; 11-18-2012 at 04:53 PM.
    I am slow therefore I am

  22. #22
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    I carry a Velosolo 6-bolt cog, so I can flip the rear wheel and finish the ride fixed in case my freewheel breaks - or I just want to have some fixed fun.

    I don't have an ideological thing against the possibility to change gearing, it's just that a lock ring tool, large wrench and chainwhip are way more of a toolbox that I'm willing to drag with me.

    I've also been toying with the idea of a dingle-setup, something like a 34-36 front and 18-20 rear. That would mean a fast 36/18 for getting from one place to another (I don't have a car) and easier trails, and 34/20 for the rough stuff. This kind of a setup has lots of SS-benefits so it's not the same as running gears, but of course purists would not accept it.

    Edit: The Lunar Quick Cog looks sweet. I'll have to give it serious consideration - I don't like to break out the aforementioned cog-changing tools even at home, and my wide-based steel cogs are quite heavy.

  23. #23
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    I have never brought a different cog with me in the pack or even in the car. I kind of feel like I've found a gear combination that is not too spinny on "the flats" and then I expect to stand or walk as needed.

    I have however just elected to bring my geared bike for a maiden voyage to a new place.

    Then there are other cases where I really just want to SS and I take my chances. I also hike quite a bit, so I figure the worst case scenario is that I will have a nice hike. I kind of feel like this is all part of the SS experience.

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