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  1. #1
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    DH SS set-up with 1/8" chain

    .
    I have a regular rear wheel 135mm spacing. I have a Shimano rear hub fh m475. See this bike was set-up as a regular geared bike but now I just want one gear and 1/8" chain. So I can find a 1/8" chain, and the front chain ring doesn't seem like it should be a problem, but what about the back end? Is there any cogs out there that are specific to a 1/8" chain yet while still be compatible with my rear hub?

    Thanks yo

  2. #2
    Yo!
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    Some of your BMX freehub cogs are 1/8.

    Check out danscomp.com

  3. #3
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    I have been checking that route, although there are few that fit the spline were the cassette used to be. As it is not a true ss. Is that called the freehub unsure?

  4. #4
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    This is the only one I found on that site that works with a shimano spline pattern. I can't till if it is 1/8" chain specific.

    http://www.danscomp.com/461054.php?cat=PARTS

    But it is what I am looking for.

  5. #5
    Yo!
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    You know, I wanted a high quality rear cog and front SS chainring, and I could only manage to get 3/32, partly because I wasn't thinking about running my 1/8 chain when I bought them.

    I have a Blackspire DH front SS ring and a Surly rear cassette cog that are both 3/32, and I'm running a Shadow 1/8 half link with no problems.

    I did a google search and came up with this weird site that lists a bunch of 1/8 shimano specific hubs.

    http://www.thefind.com/sports/info-bmx-cog

  6. #6
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    Surly cogs come in 1/8" I think and are Shimano Splined.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by FKMTB07
    Surly cogs come in 1/8" I think and are Shimano Splined.
    I just checked the site and the screw on track cogs are 1/8, but I believe the cassettes are all 3/32:

    "Our cassette-type cogs are designed to fit on standard Shimano compatible freehub bodies. These cogs have a tall tooth profile that is essential for preventing chain skip from the extra torque a singlespeed drivetrain encounters. In addition to being a stellar SS cog, the cog base width (where it contacts the freehub body) is 4.35mm, so you can stack a few of them up and use a 9-speed shifter for a simplified multi-speed drivetrain. This width also prevents it from ruining the freehub body as a result of digging grooves into it like skinny stamped cogs have a tendency to do. Surly cogs are machined from SCM415 CroMoly steel, then heat-treated for toughness and chrome-plated for surface hardening and enhanced chain lubricity. Our cogs will work with 6-9-speed 3/32" chains, although we recommend the inherently updated quality of an 8 or 9 speed chain. They are also available in every increment from 13-22t, so you can select that perfect gear."

  8. #8
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    Thanks, Yeah I'm in the same boat as I also ordered the chain without really thinking about full compatibility. Yours is pretty butter though?

  9. #9
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    Also what kind of rig is this set-up on? Do you use a tensioner? I would really like to do without one but have vertical dropouts. Thanks yo

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yo!
    I just checked the site and the screw on track cogs are 1/8, but I believe the cassettes are all 3/32:

    "Our cassette-type cogs are designed to fit on standard Shimano compatible freehub bodies. These cogs have a tall tooth profile that is essential for preventing chain skip from the extra torque a singlespeed drivetrain encounters. In addition to being a stellar SS cog, the cog base width (where it contacts the freehub body) is 4.35mm, so you can stack a few of them up and use a 9-speed shifter for a simplified multi-speed drivetrain. This width also prevents it from ruining the freehub body as a result of digging grooves into it like skinny stamped cogs have a tendency to do. Surly cogs are machined from SCM415 CroMoly steel, then heat-treated for toughness and chrome-plated for surface hardening and enhanced chain lubricity. Our cogs will work with 6-9-speed 3/32" chains, although we recommend the inherently updated quality of an 8 or 9 speed chain. They are also available in every increment from 13-22t, so you can select that perfect gear."

    O, I never realized that.


    It shouldn't be a problem running a 1/8 chain on a 3/32 cog though.

  11. #11
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    Hey Luke,

    My set up is perfect with the 1/8 chain on the 3/32 ring/cog. The only thing you'd notice is a bit of noise, but it's not something I worry about. Google "1/8 chain with 3/32 cog" and you can get some other opinions.

    I use this on my BSX setup; it's an Identiti frame with sliding rear drops, so in order to get the dropouts completely slammed, I had to be able to make 1/4" incremental changes. I tried a single half-link first to get it set, but I didn't like the issues of reliability with a single half link in a regular 1/8 chain (I was using a Sram PC-1), especially since I mash a lot out of saddle. Some people argue that putting a half link in the middle of the chain as opposed to right on the master link will solve these issues, but the coolness factor of a full half link got the best of me.

    For your situation with the vertical drops, you have a few options, but most inexpensively would be to run the tensioner, or spend some time swapping cogs/rings to find a magic ratio. Even if you run a half link, there's still a chance you'll have slack and need to use a tensioner; if I were SSing on a vertical drop frame, I'd use a BB tensioner like this:

    http://labs.yesspro.com/products/etr...hain-tensioner

    If you're not into the bb tensioner, take a look at their other products; Yess is badass. You can also try the static tensioners from Rennen and DMR.

  12. #12
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    Right on, or I souposse a E.13 LG1 or something of the sort. Deffinitely tensioning up front though to keep it clean. I think I will live with the noise for now. This looks like a real solution as far as converting to a ss.

    http://www.ebikestop.com/cassette_hu...ing-HU9020.php

    Unfortunatly out of my price range right now and that still doesn't solve a 1/8" ring up front.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by lukeh987
    Right on, or I souposse a E.13 LG1 or something of the sort. Deffinitely tensioning up front though to keep it clean. I think I will live with the noise for now. This looks like a real solution as far as converting to a ss.

    http://www.ebikestop.com/cassette_hu...ing-HU9020.php

    Unfortunatly out of my price range right now and that still doesn't solve a 1/8" ring up front.
    If you have a 1/8th in front and a 3/32nd in rear with a 1/8 chain, you'll be just fine. In fact, some dudes I know prefer running a 3/32 cog in the back because it gives you chainline breathing room if you're not able to get it dead on.

    That surly conversion makes your bike a fixed gear; is that what you're shooting for? If you're converting to fixed gear you can't use a tensioner anyway:

    "[tensioners] allow chain tension to be applied to the lower run of chain when you backpedal, and no chain tensioner is built to withstand the force of fixed gear riding" (Sheldon Brown)

    If you want to go to a dedicated SS and do the job right with vertical drops, buy the Eno eccentric freewheel hub and an Eno freewheel. Done and done, no tensioning issues, SS, lasts forever, but about $200.

    If you want to go fixed gear, you may want to consider buying one of those cogs that bolts to the IS holes for your disc brake on the rear hub. I can't remember what they're called, but they are a cheap and effective way to go fixie w/out having to buy a new hub, but you'll lose the back brake. Big deal if you're riding fixie anyway.

    If you want a cheap dedicated SS cassette hub, check out the Nashbar:

    http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product..._200276_200298

    This is what I run as of now until I pick out a better one down the line.

  14. #14
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    Why does it have to be 1/8"?
    Ride more!

  15. #15
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    Yo! I see what your saying. No I'm not looking to go fixie.

    Turns out the 1/8" chain I bought was out of stock. So that does bring up a good question why 1/8" chain? It just seemed like I needed a heavy duty chain due to my heavy DH bike and steep ascents.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by lukeh987
    Also what kind of rig is this set-up on? Do you use a tensioner? I would really like to do without one but have vertical dropouts. Thanks yo
    I am assuming that you are converting a full suspension bike. With almost all full suspension frames you MUST use a spring loaded chain tensioner because the distance between your BB and your rear hub is variable because of the suspension. You need to use a spring loaded tensioner to allow for this chain growth.

  17. #17
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    It's an Ironhorse Yakuza Chimpira HT with little stock parts. Shes heavy 40+, big fork, heavy wheels

  18. #18
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    Oh that's cool an Iron Horse, looks like a stout DJer. I've got an Identiti Dr. Jekyll BSX myself that's like 40 lbs.

    Anyway, on the Yakuza you should use one of the static tensioners I mentioned, the Rennen if you go derailleur style or the Yess bb unit, but make sure it'll work if your bike has ISCG tabs on the bb.

    As far as chains go, the 3/32 is narrower to allow for smoother shifting on derailleur equipped bikes. You usually see 1/8 on BMXs and SS; if you're running your rig hard I'd go 1/8 for sure, as they're burlier and generally heavier. Plus, 1/8 SS chains are usually pretty cheap, ie the Sram PC-1 is $10.

    As far as rear hubs go, if you're on a budget, get that Nashbar for $50; it's the cheapest out there. Heavy, but fairly strong, and if you ever want to run a 12t or lower odyssey driver, it'll accept it. If you have more cash you should look at the Hope Pro 2s etc. Plus, when you upgrade the rear hub you'll be able to get one with a thru-axle instead of the QR like the M475. You have vertical drops, so it's not that big a deal, but I always thought SS applications were tougher with rear thru-axles. What size axle does your rear dropout accept? I'd assume it's 10mm...

  19. #19
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    Unsure on size axle my rear dropouts while accept. Also unsure about ISCG tabs.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by lukeh987
    Unsure on size axle my rear dropouts while accept. Also unsure about ISCG tabs.
    I'm almost certain your drops are 10mm, but you may want to check with a ruler or something. To check for ISCG tabs, look and see if your current chain guide is bolted to the drive side bb via a welded on adapter like the one pictured. If you have this tab, you'll need to find out if the bb Yess tensioner will work, as in their instructions, it shows a hardtail without the ISCG tabs. If it won't fir with the ISCG tabs, you'll have to use a derailleur style tensioner.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  21. #21
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    Thanks man,

    I measured and they seem 10mm. I don't have those tabs around my bb, it's all smooth.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by lukeh987
    Thanks man,

    I measured and they seem 10mm. I don't have those tabs around my bb, it's all smooth.
    Good man, you'll have a silky smooth SS in no time.

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