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  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: blsuedeshu's Avatar
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    Mar 2005
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    Corrected or uncorrected frame vision?

    What are the advantages/disadvantages of having a non corrected frame and fork combination? Having never ridden this combo, it's my understanding that handling and climbing is much improved (plus I think it looks pretty cool too!). Other than not being able to add a suspension fork in the future, what would I be in for? This would be for a new 29er SS I am considering.

    Pros and cons?
    Nobody will hurt you more than yourself

  2. #2
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
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    A non-corrected frame/fork would be lower in the front. I can barely get the bar low enough on a corrected 26" bike. I think I'd have to go for an inverted riser bar on a corrected 29er...

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  3. #3
    Ovaries on the Outside
    Reputation: umarth's Avatar
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    I don't know if there is that much of a difference. Bikes are designed around suspension, or lack of, so I think you just end up with higher headtubes and toptubes. 72 ha is 72 ha. The best part of no correction is the that there isn't four inches of empty space above your tire. The bad part of no correction is that not everyone appreciates the lack there of.

  4. #4
    master blaster
    Reputation: veloreality's Avatar
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    i went uncorrected on my rigid 650b and it climbs like a dream.

  5. #5
    Man up
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    What the F are you guys talking about.
    '08 GF Montare
    '10 Rockhopper SS
    Semper Fidelis
    02-10 SSGT of Marines
    (Most) always down for a ride in the Gville area

  6. #6
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
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    About frames made for suspension forks (tall in front to account for all the suspension travel) and frames made to be used with short forks.

    If you want to put a rigid fork on a "suspension-corrected" frame, you need a "suspension-corrected" fork: usually about 470mm Axle to Crown for 29ers.

    If the frame is designed for rigid forks, something like 440 mm will do nicely for a 29er.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

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