Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    21

    Clipless Pedals - A must for SS?

    Hi all..... I'm a beginner, picked up a 2009 SS Rockhopper last month and am lovin it! Looking into some clipless pedals and was wondering are the benefits even greater on a SS? Would you consider them must for your SS?

    At the moment, I'm considering the M540s or Candy SLs. Both seem like good pedals. Is one better than the other for a beginner?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    human dehumidifier
    Reputation: wv_bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    5,054
    IMO, they'll definitely improve your riding experience.

    I'd go with the M540s. I personally don't think the non-SPD pedals offer any benefit besides being unique. Others will disagree though, and hey, maybe unique is what you seek :-)
    When you get older, much of your hate comes from knowledge and experience, which is why really old people hate everyone

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    171
    SSing is all about being efficient.
    Flat pedals are inefficient when compared to toe clips or clipless or any other way you can attach your foot to your bike. Its two different pedal strokes being clipped in and being on flats in a pair of sandals.
    Not being attached to the pedals and trying to hammer up an uneven surface is an invitation to coming off the pedals.


    I have a bike with spds and I have one with eggbeaters.
    I like the eggbeaters better.
    Last edited by 3snowboards; 08-03-2009 at 09:14 AM.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    540
    A must?

    Absolutely not... not anymore than 29" wheels, disc brakes, suspension forks or any other piece of equipment. The only must for SS is a degree of determination and passion in the rider.

    That said, clipless pedals will (as already mentioned) make your pedalling more efficient. They will also prevent crashes caused by your feet coming off of the pedals in rocky terrain. You can pull up on the pedals, so that last tiny little bit of force needed to get over a rock that would otherwise stop your front tire cold can be found, even when your pedals are in the 'wrong' position.

    They will also cause some slow speed crashes if you cannot get your foot out quickly enough. Not so bad, actually. It doesn't hurt the body quite so bad when the impact is taken over the entire side of the body. The pride, on the other hand...

  5. #5
    one chain, two sprockets
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    212
    Quote Originally Posted by 3snowboards
    Not being attached to the pedals and trying to hammer up an uneven surface is an invitation to coming off the pedals.
    Keep in mind this scenario has a direct correlation to rider ability and rider error. It is possible to hammer just fine on flats...

    Tom P.

  6. #6
    Cheezy Rider
    Reputation: Rufudufus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,684
    Not a must. I don't have them on my SS, but only because I also use it for commuting. Generally I recommend clipless.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: iKona40's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    93

    yes...off road

    I've only been riding a SS for about 1 1/2 months, but I depend on pulling up on the pedals as the incline increases. I couldn't imaging "mashing" without them. BUT...that's just me.

  8. #8
    Life is a 700c circle...
    Reputation: Norris_Hanna's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    588
    They may not be a must for single speeds, but they are a must on MY single speed.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: EBasil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,062
    They're a must for mine, too. Frogs FTW, hella.

  10. #10
    Tulsa
    Reputation: rojogonzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,083
    flats are fun
    wherever you go, there you are

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    21
    Thanks all for the feedback. Now I just have to decide which ones to get. From what I researched so far, they all seem good, it just comes down to personal preference.

    Anyone have experience with more than one brand of pedal and what your preference is? and why?

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    540
    Clipless:

    I run SPDs, and run them at really low tension. The positive feeback that lets you immediately and without a doubt KNOW that you are clipped in or out is the reason why. They are not great in muddy conditions... get them clogged up and it becomes very difficult to clip in/out. Dangerous. Fortunately, in AZ, this doesn't really happen.

    Have tried eggbeaters. Better for muddy conditions, lighter, impossible to use without your cycling shoes or if you lose a cleat. Feeling of engagment/disengagement not as confidence inspiring as SPDs.

    Speedplay frogs are weird. Comfy, with lots of float, but can feel like you are pedaling while trying to balance on top of a marble under each foot.

    Time ATAC. Probably what I would use if I didn't already have and like SPDs. I used to see alot of random pieces of ATACs on the trail from shattered pedals (like anytime I would find pedal pieces, they were ATACs)... but I believe the newer ones are more durable. These are great if you ride in muddy conditions, and feeling of engagement is less than, but close to SPDs.

    Platform:

    You just have to decide whether you want pins or cages. If you want pins, you want lots of em, and they need to be replaceable. The Tioga MX Pro is probably one of the best platforms ever made, and the Wellgo MG-1 is great also. I don't have any experience with the various caged pedals.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: boomn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    9,647
    Quote Originally Posted by nasty naz
    Thanks all for the feedback. Now I just have to decide which ones to get. From what I researched so far, they all seem good, it just comes down to personal preference.

    Anyone have experience with more than one brand of pedal and what your preference is? and why?
    We could seriously fill a whole forum just with the comments about different brands of pedals. Careful what you wish for

    I tried some CB pedals (Mallet) and I did not like the engagement, like sunset mentioned. It felt like the cleat just mushed into place. I could not get the hang of consistently clipping in either; I thought it was because i was just learning but then I switched to Shimano SPDs and suddenly I was way better and could clip in and out perfectly every time. It just started clicking (pun intended)
    Last edited by boomn; 08-04-2009 at 08:51 AM.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    34
    Quote Originally Posted by iKona40
    I've only been riding a SS for about 1 1/2 months, but I depend on pulling up on the pedals as the incline increases. I couldn't imaging "mashing" without them. BUT...that's just me.
    i'm the same as you, i'd find it strange

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    21
    Thanks boomn, sunset...

    I was leaning towards the SPDs but am going to give the Time ATAC another look. I've been encountering alot of mud lately and have read about this being a concern on the SPDs.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Burzum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    86
    Quote Originally Posted by 3snowboards
    SSing is all about being efficient.
    Flat pedals are inefficient when compared to toe clips or clipless or any other way you can attach your foot to your bike. Its two different pedal strokes being clipped in and being on flats in a pair of sandals.
    Not being attached to the pedals and trying to hammer up an uneven surface is an invitation to coming off the pedals.


    I have a bike with spds and I have one with eggbeaters.
    I like the eggbeaters better.
    I get what you are saying but don't totally agree. It's not just being efficent. To me it's about keeping it simple and having fun. I run DK iron cross pedals with replaceable spikes. They work fantastic in New England's terrain for me. Feet stay planted no problem, I don't need to carry extra shoes too, jump on it and go. And as a bonus they look"one F'ing speed" I do use spds and frogs on my XC bikes though with good effect.

  17. #17
    pyroclastic flow
    Reputation: troyer2112's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    191
    i was racing with my single speed on flat pedals that came with my monocog flight 29er, and had to switch to flat shoes without knobbies. my main concerns were coming off the pedals and slow to the top of hills. recently i bought a pair of eggbeaters, one they were amazing on keeping me attached to the bike, since it is all rigid. two, most importantly, the up stroke going up hills allowed to have speed at the top of the hills. WAY BETTER ALL AROUND.
    the thing about the eggbeaters was they were small and like mentioned before, they felt so small under my feet, not a secure feeling so i switched to acids, much better feeling!
    overall i would say they are absolutely needed for me in all aspects of riding in woods.

  18. #18
    Happy in Happy Valley
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    681
    Unless you're doing trials riding clipless is the way to go.
    Rigid Surly 1x1 650b--------Fixed CrossCheck--------Surly Pacer-------Salsa Ala Carte

  19. #19
    fresh fish in stock...... SuperModerator
    Reputation: CHUM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    8,218
    i prefer clipless.....rode with a dude on a SS with flats (his handle = Washedup)......he did just fine...and this at Henry Coe in NorCal (many hills.....no chit).....

    personal choice IMHO
    Visit these 2 places to help advance trail access:
    http://www.sharingthepct.org/
    http://www.facebook.com/SharingThePct

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    228
    I love clipless. But I also found on my ride this morning that I took my foot off the pedals to do some MX style foot dragging once or twice. I would love to find some double sided clipless pedals that also provide enough platform to temporarily mash through some stuff until clipped in again. Drawback to those seems to be that you smack them on objects more due to the size. I have little wellgo's right now ....
    8 is great

  21. #21
    SSolo
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,503
    Quote Originally Posted by troyer2112
    i was racing with my single speed on flat pedals that came with my monocog flight 29er, and had to switch to flat shoes without knobbies. my main concerns were coming off the pedals and slow to the top of hills. recently i bought a pair of eggbeaters, one they were amazing on keeping me attached to the bike, since it is all rigid. two, most importantly, the up stroke going up hills allowed to have speed at the top of the hills. WAY BETTER ALL AROUND.
    the thing about the eggbeaters was they were small and like mentioned before, they felt so small under my feet, not a secure feeling so i switched to acids, much better feeling!
    overall i would say they are absolutely needed for me in all aspects of riding in woods.
    Yup, I'd go with Crank Bros Candy or Acids.
    Fat, drunk, and stupid is no way to go through life son...

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    2,840
    nvmd, new thread...
    Last edited by mack_turtle; 08-06-2009 at 03:16 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •