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  1. #1
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    climbing technique- what's wrong?

    I was riding today and I have found that I slip a lot on technical climbs. I lack the cardio-vascular fortitude to stick with extended climbs, but I can't seem to keep my back wheel in the dirt. Standing and pedaling, I tend to unweight by back wheel and it just spins, killing my momentum. If I lean back to keep my back wheel down, I can't get enough power or I loop out.

    Technique? Bike setup? Grow some muscles?

  2. #2
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    I find if I lean up over the bars too much then I will get far more spin, for me it's finding that right position where I still get good traction - not leaning too far forward.
    ONE SHOX, ONE GEAR, LOTS of FUN! www.TrailFu.com My Rides

  3. #3
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    Technique : SLOW DOWN! Relax and try to "feel" the back tire. Be smooth. Pedal circles, don't stomp on the pedals.

    Bike setup : A shorter stem and/or higher bars may help you move back further on the bike.

    Grow some muscles : You just keep riding. You will. =
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbikerfred
    Pedal circles, don't stomp on the pedals.
    Mash away, even pull up on the upstroke on big hills.
    ONE SHOX, ONE GEAR, LOTS of FUN! www.TrailFu.com My Rides

  5. #5
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    Assume the classic oldschool "sprocket jockey" position -- ass out of the saddle and over the back wheel, head over the stem. Looks funny, but gets 'er done.

  6. #6
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    Sounds like you need to work on your core strength. You need a strong core to be able to create a stable platform for driving the pedals and keeping your weight back, while climbing out of the saddle.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by randyharris
    Mash away, even pull up on the upstroke on big hills.
    Amen!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Godless Communist
    Assume the classic oldschool "sprocket jockey" position -- ass out of the saddle and over the back wheel, head over the stem. Looks funny, but gets 'er done.
    ^^^^^^ this.

    Spread your weight out so it's over both the back wheel and the front wheel at the same time. Damn uncomfortable and damn effective.

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  9. #9
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    Body position is important too.

    But check yo' tires. Knobbies obviously help, but make sure to account for soil conditions.
    Sometimes, I question the value of my content.

  10. #10
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    stop worrying about not making it up the hill and concentrate more on your line up the hill.... get that ass out the saddle and pull up on those bars while you try and bend those cranks....
    owner and founder of www.moto-rush.com motorcycling community

  11. #11
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    what he said

    Quote Originally Posted by paco664
    stop worrying about not making it up the hill and concentrate more on your line up the hill.... get that ass out the saddle and pull up on those bars while you try and bend those cranks....
    And check your frame geometry, my back wheel hardly ever spins out when I stand-up to crank it. Keep up the hard work too!

  12. #12
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    lower your tyre pressures
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  13. #13
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    Even more important: know when to lean back.

    You need the traction most when your cranks are somewhere at the 3/9 'o clock position. That's when your weight needs to be pretty far backwards. You can rock your centre of gravity forwards when past that point. That's also the moment to compensate for a front wheel that gets of the ground. May sound a bit strange, but really works great for me.

  14. #14
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    What kind of tires are you running?

  15. #15
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    2.2 Race Kings, pretty low pressure. some tires with more knob to them might help, but I have a 2.1 Exiwolf that had the some problem. so it's not my tire that's at fault. or is it?

  16. #16
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    Haven't been on RK's. I'm in the Rockies and I've had good luck with Saguaro's, Exiwolfs (2.3), and SB8's.

  17. #17
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    learn the row technique. on every power downstroke, pull down and back on the handlebars while staying low on the bike (this works best standing up off the saddle but also works while in the saddle). It kinda looks and feels like you're pulling the bike back towards the contact patch of your rear wheel...

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by flipnidaho
    learn the row technique. on every power downstroke, pull down and back on the handlebars while staying low on the bike (this works best standing up off the saddle but also works while in the saddle). It kinda looks and feels like you're pulling the bike back towards the contact patch of your rear wheel...

    Yes! This is it. Also, you want to rock your body forward and backward depending on the immediate terrain under your wheels. It's tricky, but with practice you can do it. I would recommend bar ends as well. These will give you more leverage on the climbs.

    Bottom line: you need to really ride more aggressively. I suspect you are being timid on the hills. You need to really attack it hard. I move my body around quite a bit to compensate for the conditions directly beneath my tires.

    It takes lots of practice, so keep riding and keep pushing yourself harder and harder and soon you will be dusting people on the hills (including geared riders).

    Hammer it!!

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eboogie101
    And check your frame geometry, my back wheel hardly ever spins out when I stand-up to crank it. Keep up the hard work too!
    There is something to be said for all these ideas. One thing that has not been brought up is cockpit setup. Typically you spin out when you stand because you move your center of gravity forward when you stand. While moving your body front and back will change your center of gravity on the fly, you can shorten your stem which will naturally move your weight back. If your stem is 100mm plus, it might be worth a try.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by aka brad
    One thing that has not been brought up is cockpit setup.
    Yes it was.

    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbikerfred
    Bike setup : A shorter stem and/or higher bars may help you move back further on the bike.
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  21. #21
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    The lean back at the right time helps a lot. At some points I've had so much force on my cranks I feel like they will sheer through the metal or the chain will explode. I sit on a inverted Mary bar with a 90mm Thomson stem and this allows me to lean back enough to where I don't pop a wheelie.

    The only condition I cannot get the hang of is loose leaves, I just slip slip slip.
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbikerfred
    Yes it was.
    Okay, my bad; still such a good idea needs to be mentioned at least twice.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle
    2.2 Race Kings, pretty low pressure...
    On the rear I run a Racing Ralph 29x2.25 at about 20-22psi with a tube. What do you call low pressures?
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  24. #24
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    When standing I fnd myself balancing the front and rear wheels better if I try to get a straight up stance, rather than the one bent over the bars as described above. It also makes it easier to breathe, in my opinion. From a more upright stance shifting weight forward and back is more natural.
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  25. #25
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    Body in front handlebar and mash the pedal like crazy.

    My problem if my hands are exhausted then it's over, I loss all the energy and power. It's like my energy is drained.

  26. #26
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    If your too out of shape to ride your gear up most of the hills try a smaller gear. Sometimes you gotta suck up your manhood and get back to the basics. Hell, ride with a bigger cog until you can master your climbs like a pro and then bump down one tooth at a time.

    Its actually quite rewarding bumping down a tooth and killing yourself on the climbs and still getting to the top huffing and puffing and turning purple.

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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheepo5669
    If your too out of shape to ride your gear up most of the hills try a smaller gear. Sometimes you gotta suck up your manhood and get back to the basics. Hell, ride with a bigger cog until you can master your climbs like a pro and then bump down one tooth at a time.

    Its actually quite rewarding bumping down a tooth and killing yourself on the climbs and still getting to the top huffing and puffing and turning purple.

    Sheepo
    This is what I was thinking.
    I only ride bikes to fill the time when I'm not skiing.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheepo5669
    If your too out of shape to ride your gear up most of the hills try a smaller gear. Sometimes you gotta suck up your manhood and get back to the basics. Hell, ride with a bigger cog until you can master your climbs like a pro and then bump down one tooth at a time.

    Its actually quite rewarding bumping down a tooth and killing yourself on the climbs and still getting to the top huffing and puffing and turning purple.

    Sheepo
    This from a "Student and part time delivery boy" who started riding in "2010??"
    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by aka brad
    This from a "Student and part time delivery boy" who started riding in "2010??"
    what in that makes him unsuitable to make the observation he made???
    owner and founder of www.moto-rush.com motorcycling community

  30. #30
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    Stop reading, keep riding

    You can also adjust your pain threshold. Go harder earlier. Save some as you get closer to this obstacle.

  31. #31
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    This from a "Student and part time delivery boy" who started riding in "2010??"
    Sorry brad, Im just a snotty nosed noob who has no clue what im talking about.

    And what doesn't make since with what I said? Sounds to me like your trying to start a fight. I would love for you to try me in person but this internet babbling is childish to say the least.

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  32. #32
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  33. #33
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    thanks for the replies! I wanted to start by considering my technique, but this is important too.

    Quote Originally Posted by aka brad
    One thing that has not been brought up is cockpit setup.
    I don't want to get fall victim to marketing hype that having a different bike setup will makeme a better rider, but I know that riding a bike set up the wrong way will cause me to suffer. so here are the vitals:

    i am 5'9" 140-150 pounds (have not checked in a while, probably closer to 150 after this winter!) on a 17" Monocog 26 with 2.2 Race Kings at about 25-30 psi. My bars are 25" FSA XC riser bars and my stem is a Sycros riser, not sure of the length, it's what came with my bike. I have a few spacers under my stem. my gear is 32/20 but I use an 18t or 16t sometimes. the 20t I rode with yesterday was a struggle, glad I didn't ride the 18t on those hills. I use SPD pedals too.





    other than technique and strength, what could I change? bar ends? wider bars? Camelbak full or Red Bull?
    Last edited by mack_turtle; 02-13-2011 at 04:14 PM.

  34. #34
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    Hell man, I'm 5'11", 170 or so. I ride a 34/18 ratio on my bike, a 19" KHS Alite. Sometimes there's nothing wrong with getting off and walking for a bit, but only if you're on a singlespeed and there's nobody around to see you.
    Sometimes, I question the value of my content.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle
    thanks for the replies! I wanted to start by considering my technique, but this is important too.

    I don't want to get fall victim to marketing hype that having a different bike setup will makeme a better rider, but I know that riding a bike set up the wrong way will cause me to suffer. is here's the vitals:
    i am 5'9" 140-150 pounds (have not checked in a while, probably closer to 150 after this winter!) on a 17" Monocog 26 with 2.2 Race Kings at about 25-30 psi. My bars are 25" FSA XC riser bars and my stem is a Sycros riser, not sure of the length, it's what came with my bike. I have a few spacers under my stem. my gear is 32/20 but I use an 18t or 16t sometimes. the 20t I rode with yesterday was a struggle, glad I didn't ride the 18t on those hills. I use SPD pedals too.

    other than technique and strength, what could I change? bar ends? wider bars? Camelbak full or Red Bull?
    Your 17" Monocog probably has a 100mm stem. Monocogs also have a longish top tube, so you might find switching to a 75mm will balance out your weight a little better. Remember the moment you stand up, you usually move your center of gravity forward and off the rear tire. Eventually you will learn to stand and mash, while still hanging your butt over the seat. However, if you want to make it easier until you get there, a shorter stem or more sweep in your handlebars, will naturally mitigate these changes in your center of gravity.

    BTW, don't sweat the, "I gots to have a big gear ratio". There wouldn't be 20-22t cogs if riders didn't use them. Try and use a cog that can barely get you over the toughest hill you ride (3 out of 4 times or so). Eventually you will tire of spinning out more than making the hill and you'll move up. and as erik1245 said
    Quote Originally Posted by erik1245
    there's nothing wrong with getting off and walking for a bit, but only if you're on a singlespeed and there's nobody around to see you
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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheepo5669
    Sorry brad, Im just a snotty nosed noob who has no clue what im talking about.

    And what doesn't make since with what I said? Sounds to me like your trying to start a fight. I would love for you to try me in person but this internet babbling is childish to say the least.

    Sheepo
    Whoa there partner, just me making a wisecrack, no harm intended. It was your statement
    Quote Originally Posted by Sheepo5669
    Hell, ride with a bigger cog until you can master your climbs like a pro
    I've been riding a long time and I still don't know what it's like "riding like a pro". What is it you do that would cause me to want to try you in person? Do you make good thai food? I love spring rolls.
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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheepo5669
    Sorry brad, Im just a snotty nosed noob who has no clue what im talking about.

    And what doesn't make since with what I said? Sounds to me like your trying to start a fight. I would love for you to try me in person but this internet babbling is childish to say the least.

    Sheepo
    Maybe he was impressed with your insight.

    I am.

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  38. #38
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    Whoa there partner, just me making a wisecrack, no harm intended. It was your statement
    Hey man, I dont know what your intentions were but it sounded more like a personal insult than a wisecrack to me.

    I've been riding a long time and I still don't know what it's like "riding like a pro".
    Thats a figure of speech.

    Sheepo
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  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheepo5669
    Hey man, I dont know what your intentions were but it sounded more like a personal insult than a wisecrack to me.
    Sheepo
    If you didn't know my intemtions then why... oh never mind, lets not hijack this post and get back on track here. Your statement
    If your too out of shape to ride your gear up most of the hills try a smaller gear.
    was right on and I used it when I said
    There wouldn't be 20-22t cogs if riders didn't use them.
    a few months and he'll be mastering his climbs like a...well...a..MSHC (Master Singlespeed Hill Climber)
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  40. #40
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    Looking at your set up, you might also consoder some wider bars. More leverage to pull and pump against as you mash those pedals... Look to something around 27"
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  41. #41
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    just try some different stuff. the idea of singlespeeding is very simple but mastering the technique is actually more difficult than riding a geared bike.

    weghting your bike correctly and working on your core strength are the biggest things you can do.

    and just ride more... always just ride more!

  42. #42
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    My 2 cents...

    1 Read a long time ago to pull back on the bars when you are climbing if your rear wheel is spinning. Puts the weight on the back tire. Feels wierd at first but has always worked for me.

    2 I have found when I get really tired and stand for a climb I lock my arms and end up resting my upper body on the bar to take the weight off my legs to give them a break. Thus no weight on the back tire. Got to stay loose on the bike and move around.

  43. #43
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    I love a healthy debate. Even the occasional troll & flame-job. We all need to have a sense of humor, sarcasm, and irony for this to work.

    When starting out SSing, YOU WILL SSuffer. I certainly did. Learning how to balance power and control was part of of it all. Tires, cockpit, steel or Ti frame, gear-ratios, bar-ends, etc. were all together worth only about 25% of the whole equation. YOUR legs, YOUR lungs, YOUR balance, and YOUR endurance make up the rest. I'm still trying to find/refine mine.

    An article called "How to climb like a pro" was published in a MTB magazine a decade or 15 years ago by some old NORBA pro, John somebody or another. I'll paraphrase: When climbing seated, drop your elbows and pull straight back on the bars to make power". Made sense to me then, still does today.

    Climbing SStanding is a little different. Our tendency is to try to put down massive amounts of power in a short burst and get it over with quick, IF the hill is short AND you have good traction that may work. Tinker said something like "I don't get why all these people are spinning in such little gears, It wears me out just watching them" while big-ringing the effing "wall" on some 15K' endurance ride in So-Cal.

    Lately, I've been climbing those short hills standing (get thiSS) at HALF my usual speed. WHA?! Close your mouths, you're catching flies. I'll explain.

    SSo, you wanna climb 5000+ feet a day? Big cogs are your friend. And you're going to have to learn to conserve your power somehow. So, I stand and climb when I can't sit and grind. I catch my breath by slowing everything down and using my weight on the pedals

    Like I said earlier. Be smooth. I'll add this bit. Pull up on the bars and rock the bike into the pedal stroke. If it makes you back ache a little, your doing it right. You shouldn't look like your humping your stem. But keeping your torso straight uses those muscles. If you want your back to stop hurting, do more crunches at home (YOU DO workout your core right?).

    At some point, we run out of that oh so precious O2 our brain has been crying about. At that point. the ability balance and climb slowly, while catching my breath saves my a$$. Who knows. I may even have enough left in the tank to run down and humiliate someone half my age geared 2:1 (did it today as a matter of fact)
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  44. #44
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    Today I am trying with my gears and the set-up is 32x24 and the road is around 30-40 degree climb.
    The climb is only 1 mile I try to stand and hammer but I stop few times and in the end I shift to my granny gear.

    Now my hands are hurt.

    Most of the uphill I cannot conquer without walking with my SS 32x21 is the 30 degree or more climbing.

  45. #45
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    Good post!
    Raised in a Chicken-Coop by Chickens

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackspade
    Today I am trying with my gears and the set-up is 32x24 and the road is around 30-40 degree climb.
    The climb is only 1 mile I try to stand and hammer but I stop few times and in the end I shift to my granny gear.

    Now my hands are hurt.

    Most of the uphill I cannot conquer without walking with my SS 32x21 is the 30 degree or more climbing.
    30 to 40 degree climb is insane
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  47. #47
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    I try to imagine as much tension in my arms and back. I try to think back to hauling as on a bmx bike. If youre noodly in your upper body, you tend to sag on the climbs and slip more. If you think about staying tense, you can use that to get a nice 'stairmaster' effect. I also try to keep my back as straight as possible, weight over the rear tire as has already been stated.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackspade
    Today I am trying with my gears and the set-up is 32x24 and the road is around 30-40 degree climb.
    The climb is only 1 mile I try to stand and hammer but I stop few times and in the end I shift to my granny gear.

    Now my hands are hurt.

    Most of the uphill I cannot conquer without walking with my SS 32x21 is the 30 degree or more climbing.
    Surely you mean 30-40 percent, not degree?

    30-40 degrees is like trying to ride up the roof of a house and, unless it's just a short bank where you can get a run-up, it's just not possible, not for me and not for anyone I know either. Even 30%, which is "only" 17 degrees, is a damn tough climb.

    Or else, I'm not the climbing animal that some of you young dudes obviously are and I need a big dose of MTFU medicine.......

  49. #49
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    I am not sure the exact number is but it's almost like you put your front wheel 30cm higher than the rear wheel.

    What I know is when I push the bike with full stretch arm my armpit touch the seat. The pain on my calve is crazy.

    Since the place I live is surrounded by mountain so there's a lot very steep road like this.
    So just imagine when you go downhill you can go more than 60kph without even pedaling.

    Here are some data for some place:


    Last edited by jackspade; 02-14-2011 at 08:20 AM.

  50. #50
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    i switched my stock 710mm Syncros bars for these FSA bars because the FSA's are a whole lot lighter. however, am I going to feel those few ounces with an extra 2-3 inches of bar width?

  51. #51
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    If you live in the San Diego, CA area, I suggest trying the Santa Ysabel preserve to practice your climbing. Start at the park and ride just off highway 79 (near dudley's). You almost immediately hit a massive hill climb (seems never ending). At some spots, I was sitting on the tip of my seat (simply could not stand). Other spots I just had to walk. Riding those hills for several weeks *really* improved my SSing ability.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle
    i switched my stock 710mm Syncros bars for these FSA bars because the FSA's are a whole lot lighter. however, am I going to feel those few ounces with an extra 2-3 inches of bar width?
    Bar width is extremely personal as is sweep and rise. If I read this right you switched from the 710mm Syncros to FSA 25" (635mm) as the FSA's are lighter. Unless you want narrower handlebars, this may not be a good trade off. As you suspected, lightness is most likely less important than control. Further a wider bar gives you more leverage and might help in your climbing.
    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

  53. #53
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    yeah, I am going to put the wider Sycros bars back on and see if it makes a difference. that's no substitute for strength, technique, and more time on the pedals, but it might help a little.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheepo5669
    If your too out of shape to ride your gear up most of the hills try a smaller gear. Sometimes you gotta suck up your manhood and get back to the basics. Hell, ride with a bigger cog until you can master your climbs like a pro and then bump down one tooth at a time.

    Its actually quite rewarding bumping down a tooth and killing yourself on the climbs and still getting to the top huffing and puffing and turning purple.

    Sheepo
    This is what I was thinking as well...only because when I am tired, I tend to slip the way the OP described. If I loose leg and arm power, my momentum drops and I try to compensate by leaning too far forward. Eventually I get hung up by some microscopic obstacle and loose the rear wheel.
    Responds to gravity

  55. #55
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    I hate gears, shifter, and derailer.

    SS all the way now since it's easier to walk and push the bike rather than ride my such problematic gears.

    Even my SS folding bike 16" is better on climbing than my gears.

    That's it, I had enough.

    No more gears for climb, gears are for cadence only for burning my fat.

  56. #56
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    I've just change my handlebar which is longer I use 610mm which is 550mm before.

    It's amazing how the performance increased, I climb a lot easier with less effort.

    I remember the spot that I use feel muscle pain but now it's gone, I think I am gonna change my cog to heavier one.

  57. #57
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    Now go get some 710mm or wider, heck I've got a ss friend who rides with 777mm bars.
    ONE SHOX, ONE GEAR, LOTS of FUN! www.TrailFu.com My Rides

  58. #58
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    I found for myself the perfect combination :
    - big wheels, 29er tires have a longer contact patch, more grip even for a 2.2 RK
    - wide bars : 710 mm
    - short stem : 70 mm
    Of course, I'm far from being a singlespeed pro but it's going far better than I'd ever expected
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  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmx1
    I found for myself the perfect combination :
    - big wheels, 29er tires have a longer contact patch, more grip even for a 2.2 RK
    - wide bars : 710 mm
    - short stem : 70 mm
    Of course, I'm far from being a singlespeed pro but it's going far better than I'd ever expected
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  60. #60
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    I am a little bit curious is bar sweep can improve climbing performance?
    Is there any different with flatbar and back sweep?

    @dmx1
    That's a nice on*one.

  61. #61
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    Too much sweep is not good either, it makes it harder to ride technical sections and for jumping it s*cks too. It's just important to have wide bars, it allows you to rock your core from side to side, thus having more power available from your legs...

  62. #62
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    Bar ends and lower your handlebars. That will allow you to pull up/back on the bars using your lats/core versus your biceps/traps. Makes a HUGE difference for me.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flat Ark
    Bar ends and lower your handlebars. That will allow you to pull up/back on the bars using your lats/core versus your biceps/traps. Makes a HUGE difference for me.
    About lower handlebar is great because you have more space for pull the bar, but how about for downhill?

    My body usually behind the seat for downhill or descend, so is it good too?

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle
    thanks for the replies!
    ...

    other than technique and strength, what could I change? bar ends? wider bars? Camelbak full or Red Bull?
    Quote Originally Posted by jackspade
    About lower handlebar is great because you have more space for pull the bar, but how about for downhill?

    My body usually behind the seat for downhill or descend, so is it good too?

    Lower your bars, get rid of the spacers (under your stem).
    Wide low bars are great for climbing out of the saddle.

    Behind the saddle is good foor steep downhill sections, but remeber, before goining downhill, you'll need to get uphill first.
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  65. #65
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    Better fitness will help you a lot. Everything goes wrong when you are completely exhausted. Practice proper weight distribution when out of saddle on climbs Try bar ends if you are not using them already. Make sure they are set up correctly though..

  66. #66
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    Also remember that it really helps to shout out as loud as possible when you're climbing and you need that last bit of power....
    Sometimes, I question the value of my content.

  67. #67
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    Cool!!

    I'll try to use lower handlebar since I don't have any spacers below my stem.
    Maybe I'll use thinner bolt for my steerer to make it lower - My bike is still 1" - 25.4mm oldies steerer.

    And I always climb around 20 miles with 70% standing and hammer rocking my handlebar moving my body left-right and the good thing I use momentum, my body weight and gravity to climb - less muscle involve before I go downhill yeehaaww thingy on some damage road with a lot big rocks(not that big though).

  68. #68
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    Something I noticed: As I get tired my upper body fatigues first and my chest starts to drop towards the bars It gets harder and harder for me to keep weight on the rear tire, which results in wheel spin and more fatigue. Sorter stems and a higher bar position help, but it really just takes time to get stronger.

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheepo5669
    If your too out of shape to ride your gear up most of the hills try a smaller gear. Sometimes you gotta suck up your manhood and get back to the basics. Hell, ride with a bigger cog until you can master your climbs like a pro and then bump down one tooth at a time.

    Its actually quite rewarding bumping down a tooth and killing yourself on the climbs and still getting to the top huffing and puffing and turning purple.

    Sheepo
    I moved from 18t to 20t and it changed every climb for me, now feeling SStronger, more confident and ordering white industries 19t freewheel.

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackspade
    I am not sure the exact number is but it's almost like you put your front wheel 30cm higher than the rear wheel.

    What I know is when I push the bike with full stretch arm my armpit touch the seat. The pain on my calve is crazy.

    Since the place I live is surrounded by mountain so there's a lot very steep road like this.
    So just imagine when you go downhill you can go more than 60kph without even pedaling.

    Here are some data for some place:


    Just got an SS yesterday,so enjoying this thread.


    A small correction on these slopes.
    looks like about 10% (400m over 4 km or 700 m over 7km.
    A 40% slope is a double black at a ski resort.
    doubt you could bike up that

  71. #71
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    I think not that slope like ski resort, it's still climbable with low gear ratio.

    Now I change my handlebar to 660 low rise with less sweep almost feel like flatbar and it's amazing that now I climb easier also this handlebar is great for technical turn.

    I use PZ A3RB - I think it's pazzaz.but I don't find the product on the site LOL.

  72. #72
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    All very good suggestions so far regarding body positioning, weight distribution, cockpit setup, and technique. I'll add one thing.

    Attitude. What is between your ears makes much more of a difference to your riding than most people think. Repeat after me: "I LIKE climbing. I would rather be climbing than descending. Every time I climb something long and steep, it is such a good feeling." Yeah... you start sounding insane. But you know what? It works. Maybe I'm insane. I don't care.

    Bottom line, your body will continue doing whatever you enjoy. Your brain is hard-wired this way. If you are enjoying the climb, you have incentive to keep doing it. That's important. Then you stop only when you can no longer physically turn the pedals, which the rest of the posts in this thread should help with.
    For me, riding bikes is not a hobby, it is a way of life.
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  73. #73
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    When I climb all I follow is my body will and instinct, too many think or use my brain on climb is more exhausted than I thought.

  74. #74
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    Try this. Guaranteed to improve your hill climbing ability:

    <iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/7605962?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="400" height="300" frameborder="0"></iframe><p><a href="http://vimeo.com/7605962">Power Cranks Review: Part II</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/user2351027">Testrider.com</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>

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