Results 1 to 23 of 23
  1. #1
    Just Ride
    Reputation: Cormac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,740

    Carbon handlebar

    Loving my new cog! Great bike. But it's a porker weighs 30lb on the dot. So she needs to go on a diet. And I figure what better place to start than the handlebars? Granted, it'll probably end up only being a few ounces maybe a quarter pound or so if I'm lucky, but I know carbon is the way to go. As it can help to eliminate trail buzz. Sometimes I get it worse than others.

    I am a little concerned though about carbon. I never really trusted the stuff. I've heard horror stories of carbon failure. Not sure how common that is? How well does carbon stand up to constant pulling from climbing on SS?

    Thinking carbon bars and eventually carbon fork. That'll probably be the last thing I change. At that it would be just to knock off the last few pounds.

    This bar looks to be designed for DH/FR/AM. So I'd imagine it could handle anything my XC riding could throw at it. Hopefully including the tendency to crash, but that is probably best taken on a case by case basis.

    Easton Havoc Carbon Handlebar 2013 > Components > Handlebars and Stems > Mountain Bike Handlebars | Jenson USA Online Bike Shop

    Any experiences with this bar? Any other suggestions for a good carbon bar is also very welcome!
    SS ==> Nut up or Shut up!

  2. #2
    MMS
    MMS is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MMS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    168
    I'm scared of Carbon on the front end...maybe it's my pretty face. I'd like to know if there's any 200+ pounders riding Carbon bars? Catastrophic bar failure is "a wake up in a cold sweat" sorta fear for me.

    Not trying to hijack your thread Cormac...just maybe adding an extra bit info. Sorry if I offend.
    I'm having more FUN than anybody!

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    2,783
    what year is that bike and how much of it was stock? I had a 2010 26" moncog and the rims were the first thing to go when I wanted to drop some weight. the seatpost is a boat anchor as well.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    737
    Deal with your inner weight wheezy in the following order:

    #1) rider (i need a diet myself)
    #2) frame
    #3) fork
    #4) wheels (until they are super light focus on them above all other parts)
    #5) cranks (hey they spin)
    #6) pedals (personally I ride XT but Eggbeaters are super light and function well)
    #7) chain (put a light one on the race bike)
    #8) cog/ring (save a bit but stay with big ring/cog to keep teeth engaged)
    #9) Grips
    #10) Saddle
    #11) Stem
    #12) Seatpost
    #13) Bars (only after you have covered most everything else)

    Have fun and happy trails.
    Mark Farnsworth, Raleigh, NC
    http://farnsworthbikes.com

  5. #5
    Just Ride
    Reputation: Cormac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,740
    Quote Originally Posted by MMS View Post
    I'm scared of Carbon on the front end...maybe it's my pretty face. I'd like to know if there's any 200+ pounders riding Carbon bars? Catastrophic bar failure is "a wake up in a cold sweat" sorta fear for me.

    Not trying to hijack your thread Cormac...just maybe adding an extra bit info. Sorry if I offend.
    It's cool, that's kinda my thought on the whole carbon thing as well. But it might be necessary. As I see no reason why in a couple years this bike can't weigh in at 23lb or maybe even less. Of course I'd need to change out everything. Which is my goal anyway. I'm riding this SS while I buy the parts for a new SS. I'll just put the parts on this bike till all that's left is the frame and then that may or may not go. Depends when I get to that point!

    Quote Originally Posted by febikes View Post
    Deal with your inner weight wheezy in the following order:

    #1) rider (i need a diet myself)
    #2) frame
    #3) fork
    #4) wheels (until they are super light focus on them above all other parts)
    #5) cranks (hey they spin)
    #6) pedals (personally I ride XT but Eggbeaters are super light and function well)
    #7) chain (put a light one on the race bike)
    #8) cog/ring (save a bit but stay with big ring/cog to keep teeth engaged)
    #9) Grips
    #10) Saddle
    #11) Stem
    #12) Seatpost
    #13) Bars (only after you have covered most everything else)

    Have fun and happy trails.
    I was thinking start with handlebars as that would help with comfort. Wheels are pricey! Regardless of if I go with pre built or buy all the stuff separately and have em built. Though I have heard wheels are the best smile for the dollar you can get out of an upgrade! One thing for sure I need to do is get lighter tires. The stock nevagals are 800g each! There's a pound right there! Something around the 700 gram range would be acceptable I suppose. But I need big volume, so I might have to settle for heavy tires regardless of what I go with.

    OH and the whole bike is stock! Except for the BB7s I robbed off my other bike. No weight savings to be had there.
    SS ==> Nut up or Shut up!

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    737
    Quote Originally Posted by Cormac View Post
    I was thinking start with handlebars as that would help with comfort.
    Unless you simply like spending money skip the carbon bars. They will not do much from the perspective of comfort. Save money towards a suspension fork. Frankly for comfort go the other direction and add Ergons, curvy bars, and bar ends. Big bar ends add weight but they increase comfort. Bendy bars are always heavier because the material needs to be heavier to support bends but they are awesome for comfort.



    Quote Originally Posted by Cormac View Post
    OH and the whole bike is stock! Except for the BB7s I robbed off my other bike. No weight savings to be had there.
    XT Hydro brakes will be an upgrade you are glad you make. They will save only a little weight but they work soooooo much better.
    Mark Farnsworth, Raleigh, NC
    http://farnsworthbikes.com

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    111

    Carbon Bars!

    I had the Easton Havens on my FSR 29er for a year with no issues. I like to go downhill fast, I hit jumps, drops, everything. Bombed the bike down everything!

    Now I have Easton Havoc bars on my SS and my FSR for the extra width. I love them, they dampen the trail vibration a little (especially on the rigid SS) and they still feel stiff and give lots of control.

    Havens are 174g, Havocs 235, so you could possibly save 100+ grams off your weight (~1/4 lb) and get a better performing bar.

    I've been as high as 225 w/o gear on these bars, no issues.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    111

    Wheels

    it's better to lose 1 lb off your wheels than 2 or 3 off your frame for riding performance. Lighter is better as long as they are still strong enough!

    Tires are the catch for me, lighter "usually" mean less traction/performance so you have to find the balance. And yes, those tires are heavy!

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: A1an's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,573
    I have been running a carbon bar of some sort on my Monocog for at least four years. Over the years I have hovered around 200-220 with ride gear and never had an issue.

    IMO the purpose of the carbon bar is more about soaking up some of the trail chatter rather than weight savings. If you really want to shave some weight AND feel a benefit of the weight loss start with the wheelset.
    Signature

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    193
    I weigh 190 lbs and use a Truvativ Noir Team carbon bar on my unit with no problems. Rigid fork and ESI Chunky grips for some cushion. But buying a nice wheel set and making them tubeless is probably the best bang for your buck up grade in terms of performance and ride quality.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: borbntm's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    455
    I am 215 and have been riding a Civilian Luditte for over a year with a Civilian/Whiskey #7 clone carbon fork. I added an Niner flat top carbon bar, and Easton Haven carbon seat post. Stan's Arch EX wheel set.....Got it down from over 27lbs. To around 23.5 lbs.

    Rides awesome now and I have complete trust in the carbon parts at this point! I got the bar and post on sale at Jenson USA

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SlowPokePete's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,504
    I've got the Niner Flat Top carbon on both my bikes.

    Real happy with the width, etc.

    Got the second set from Jenson for $99 shipped...

    SPP
    Rigid.

  13. #13
    Just Ride
    Reputation: Cormac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,740
    Dampening the vibration is what I was referring to as far as "comfort" goes. But maybe I'll hold off on anything before I go with wheels. As that will be the single most expensive upgrade, might just have to knock that one out first! Thanks for the responses guys!
    SS ==> Nut up or Shut up!

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    124
    Quote Originally Posted by borbntm View Post
    I am 215 and have been riding a Civilian Luditte for over a year with a Civilian/Whiskey #7 clone carbon fork. I added an Niner flat top carbon bar, and Easton Haven carbon seat post. Stan's Arch EX wheel set.....Got it down from over 27lbs. To around 23.5 lbs.

    Rides awesome now and I have complete trust in the carbon parts at this point! I got the bar and post on sale at Jenson USA
    We have about the same bike :-) Luddite, Ritchey WCS Stem, 3T Xida Ltd bar, WTB TCS Wheelset, Thomson Post, Deore Brakes, X9 crankset w/ Bling Ring, yada yada.... 23.5 lbs The only thing left stock on my Luddite is the frame, fork, headset, and seatpost clamp...

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    497
    Rotating mass first in the order of Wheels, cranks/pedals, tires. I put tires last because if you go with too light of a tire you may actually ride slower (less confidence or less volume so have to take smoother lines due to running higher pressure) or be fixing flats all the time

    Then do whatever contact points feel the best. I hope you plan on riding the bike and want to be comfortable on it over taking pictures of it and telling people how light it is.

    Then worry about overall frame weight.

    What I did was make a spreadsheet and figured out what the best grams/$ savings were on different items I could replace. The ESI grips (any foam grip will do) gave me the best grams to $ savings on my bike. You have to decide for yourself if you can do with foam grips or not. You can then do a cost analysis. You can also be like....well these grips are $15, but a new fork is $300 which I can't afford right now.

    I went from my stock Mary steel fork at 3 pounds even to a carbon Niner fork at 1.2 pounds.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    497
    I am a big fan of the carbon flat EC90 680mm 9 degree sweep bars.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    213
    I got 690mm syncros carbon risers off ebay for my cog. Took it out on a ride today def. dampens the hurt, Im 250 no gear. Got it from the seller crosslake sales for about 58 shipped. Just picked up some hydro brakes from them for 65 shipped too!

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    156
    Quote Originally Posted by Cormac View Post

    This bar looks to be designed for DH/FR/AM. So I'd imagine it could handle anything my XC riding could throw at it. Hopefully including the tendency to crash, but that is probably best taken on a case by case basis.

    Easton Havoc Carbon Handlebar 2013 > Components > Handlebars and Stems > Mountain Bike Handlebars | Jenson USA Online Bike Shop

    Any experiences with this bar? Any other suggestions for a good carbon bar is also very welcome!

    I've been riding the Easton Havoc bar on both my main bikes for several years. It's light, wide, and very stiff. It doesn't have the same dampening characteristics as lighter carbon bars that I've tried (an Easton Monkey Light and a Ragley Carnegie), but I still like it enough to have two. I wanted something in the 740-750mm range and if I recall correctly, it was the only one available at the time I was looking. I'm not a big guy, but it seems pretty much indestructible to me.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    43

    Carbon handlebar

    Have some Enve's on my KM.

    Could not be happier. Just enough flex to help dampen out the rigid front end.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rob1035's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    784
    I really like my Syntace Vector carbons

  21. #21
    Poacher
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    1,474
    Easton Haven Aluminun for me, both bikes. I just rid myself of ALL plastic parts on both bikes after poking a hole in my carbon frame. Even though I am done with carbon fiber parts, I would vote for Easton Carbon Haven. My old carbon monkey light bars from 2001 were trouble free even after crashes. Newer carbon bars must be better technology? I would go for lightweight Haven or Niner bars.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: EstebanRapido's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    101
    The stock bar on my Monocog was very heavy. I had switched to a shorter and much lighter bar for a little while. It felt like the shorter bar didn't give me what I wanted on the climbs. Then I got my self a 700mm Crank Brothers Iodine 3 bar and I'm happy but at the same time I don't know how I could go with a carbon bar. Too much flex on the climbs.

    And now I am wondering if I should go to a beach cruiser style bar I can work my lats more when climbing.
    Specialized Enduro Expert 09
    Redline Monocog 29er 09
    Trek 6700 05

  23. #23
    Got a suspension fork
    Reputation: randyharris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    2,242
    I've got over 3,000 miles on a year old version of that bar. Works great, tough as nails, light, very nice width and angle. Winner in my book.
    ONE SHOX, ONE GEAR, LOTS of FUN! www.TrailFu.com My Rides

Similar Threads

  1. Broken Carbon Handlebar anyone?
    By deanopatoni in forum All Mountain
    Replies: 74
    Last Post: 03-09-2013, 03:57 PM
  2. Help Me Choose a Carbon Handlebar
    By SlowPokePete in forum Singlespeed
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: 05-09-2012, 05:24 PM
  3. Carbon Handlebar
    By Squatcho in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 08-11-2011, 07:01 PM
  4. Carbon Handlebar Help..old MaxM MX-6s
    By mcseforsale in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-27-2011, 09:15 AM
  5. Flat Top Carbon Handlebar
    By tri-tele in forum Niner Bikes
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 01-18-2011, 02:44 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •