Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: broken betls

  1. #1
    blet drive
    Reputation: JUNGLEKID5's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    2,166

    Cool-blue Rhythm broken betls

    has any one broken a belt on there spot long board belt drive and is there an issue with it sliping??? any help.. a local shop seems to thing that it is a big deala and wont even give it a chance..
    Save a tree & wipe your butt with an owl.
    Thank your local Sierra Club.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    416
    The belt is toothed so it cannot slip. (much like the harley belts).

    I dunno about chances of it breaking. But they are reported to be stronger than chains and less susceptible to wear and tear.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    172
    I'm sure if anyone had broken a belt it'd be all over internet forums like this one Tell your LBS to drag their sorry selves into the 21st century and MTFU.

  4. #4
    blet drive
    Reputation: JUNGLEKID5's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    2,166
    thats whay iv been sasying that belts are hear to stay and like it or not they work... and we need to get some in our local shops... period.
    Save a tree & wipe your butt with an owl.
    Thank your local Sierra Club.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MellowCat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    877
    This is from the 29er board....

    Broken belt on brand new spot
    "When the end of the world comes, I want to be in Cincinnati because it's always 20 years behind the times." Twain

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: AM Octopus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    121
    I haven't heard of any of the belts breaking but...we have had a few bikes in that slip. I've heard there has been issues with bikes not being delivered just yet because of the slipping belts.

    Early on Spot was delivering bikes with chains on them and telling people that when the belts were ready that they would send them the belt, chainring and cog to change them over.

    We have a couple Trek bikes in the shop that have the belts on them and one of them we can get the belt to slip. Well I should say that some of us with enough torque can get them to slip.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by AM Octopus
    I haven't heard of any of the belts breaking but...we have had a few bikes in that slip. I've heard there has been issues with bikes not being delivered just yet because of the slipping belts.

    Early on Spot was delivering bikes with chains on them and telling people that when the belts were ready that they would send them the belt, chainring and cog to change them over.

    We have a couple Trek bikes in the shop that have the belts on them and one of them we can get the belt to slip. Well I should say that some of us with enough torque can get them to slip.

    If you can get it to slip, you most likely do not have a proper belt line or tension.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: AM Octopus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    121
    Quote Originally Posted by mothgils
    If you can get it to slip, you most likely do not have a proper belt line or tension.

    It's interesting that you say that because we have had one of the Spot guys in the shop (who used to work at our shop) helping with one of the bikes. Even with the belt tight enough that when you spin the cranks backwards they hardly turn we have been able to make the belt slip. Since Spot is in our town we run into people all the time on the trail that have had issues with the bikes.

    It's not as "easy" "fool proof" 'maintenance free" as Spot intended it to be when they came out with it. I think the splines need to be deeper on the belt and the chainring/cogs to get better grip. It still needs some fine tuning before the jury is out.

  9. #9
    Occasionally engagedů
    Reputation: Ptor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,612
    Quote Originally Posted by AM Octopus
    Even with the belt tight enough that when you spin the cranks backwards they hardly turn...
    The only belt bikes I've seen in real life were in a shop in Ft. Collins and the belts were so tight the cranks had very noticeable resistance when spinning it backwards -- that can't be good for the bearings or for pedaling/rolling efficiency. Rode one of the Spots around in the parking lot (admittedly not much of a test) and still think it's an "emperor's new clothes" sort of thing...
    "The plural of anecdote is not data." -- Attributed to various people in a variety of forms, but always worth remembering...

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Charlie Cheswick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    68
    I broke a belt! I bought my Spot in November and about a month in on a short, steep climb; I broke that sucker and almost planted my nards on the stem. Anyway, I have learned a lot since then and I changed out the tensioners that came with the bike. The belt will never slip. In addition, if it is tensioned properly it will never break. The worst thing about the Spot design is that it uses the wheel quick release as the only tensioner to hold the belt. That means you really have to crank that sucker down. I think other frame makers are making much better designs to tension the belt. I saw Ventana is using a rocker type assembly that looks like it would work much better than Spot's.
    Anyway, the belt drive is awesome and I would recommend it to anyone. I will be glad to help you dudes if you have any questions about it because I think it is just the nuts for single speeders.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: AM Octopus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    121
    Quote Originally Posted by PeT
    The only belt bikes I've seen in real life were in a shop in Ft. Collins and the belts were so tight the cranks had very noticeable resistance when spinning it backwards -- that can't be good for the bearings or for pedaling/rolling efficiency. Rode one of the Spots around in the parking lot (admittedly not much of a test) and still think it's an "emperor's new clothes" sort of thing...

    And with all that resistance you get a lot of noise from the belt creaking. That alone would drive me nuts. It's like riding a bike with a squeaky chain.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Charlie Cheswick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    68
    Quote Originally Posted by AM Octopus
    And with all that resistance you get a lot of noise from the belt creaking. That alone would drive me nuts. It's like riding a bike with a squeaky chain.
    My belt drive runs as quiet as an indian wearing moccasins sneaking up on John Wayne.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Cheswick
    I broke a belt! I bought my Spot in November and about a month in on a short, steep climb; I broke that sucker and almost planted my nards on the stem. Anyway, I have learned a lot since then and I changed out the tensioners that came with the bike. The belt will never slip. In addition, if it is tensioned properly it will never break. The worst thing about the Spot design is that it uses the wheel quick release as the only tensioner to hold the belt. That means you really have to crank that sucker down. I think other frame makers are making much better designs to tension the belt. I saw Ventana is using a rocker type assembly that looks like it would work much better than Spot's.
    Anyway, the belt drive is awesome and I would recommend it to anyone. I will be glad to help you dudes if you have any questions about it because I think it is just the nuts for single speeders.

    I had a similar situation with the slipping. It wasn't that the belt slipped under force but I could get the entire wheel to shift under braking and that would throw the belt line off. The Spot Rocket tensioners suck and I swapped them out with a better set. I even filed the paint off of the inside of the new tensioners so that it would grip. I combined that with a DT Swiss RWS on the rear and haven't had any problems since.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Cheswick
    My belt drive runs as quiet as an indian wearing moccasins sneaking up on John Wayne.
    Exactly. I feel like a ninja on the trails.

  15. #15
    skillz to pay billz
    Reputation: nOOby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    3,554
    Quote Originally Posted by mothgils
    I combined that with a DT Swiss RWS on the rear and haven't had any problems since.
    yep, same here.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velobike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    7,003
    I don't run a lot of tension on the beltdrive conversions I have done.

    What causes "slip" in my opinion is a flexing chainstay. This means the belt arrives at the rear cog at a slight angle and rides up on the cog.

    My bikes with laterally stiff chainstays do not need a lot of tension. I have fixed the bike with flexy chainstay by running a preventer pulley. This means again I do not need much tension even though the bike is extremely flexy. Anyone who was at SSUK09 would have seen me walking up easy hills because of this flexing (that's my story anyway ), but now it can be ridden hard without slipping.

    The pulley sits not quite touching the belt unless the belt rides up on the rear cog.

    My measure of "not much tension" is what I'd call "slightly tight" on my SS chain drive bike. (As you can see I use scientific methods )
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57║36' Highlands, Scotland

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

mtbr.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.