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  1. #1
    I don't huck.
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    Bolts vs.QRs: How much stiffer?

    Been looking at SS hubs like the Pauls and White Ind, etc.

    I am sure that a bolt on hub is a tighter interface then a standard 5mm QR, and I have no issues with accepting that for the rear wheel with track ends or dropouts.

    But in the front wheel/hub...I wonder how it compares? I don't really have any issues with a bolt on front hub (not a nutted axle, but a bolt INTO the axle...I am pretty sure that some hubs are like that...Pauls, etc) but the other easy option is a 9mm QR like the DT Swiss provides if I buy a Hope hub for the front.

    Assuming that I end up with an older style fork...no 15QR or 20mm for the SS, It would be nice if I used a Paul's rear hub to match it with a front hub.

    Thoughts and practical experiences?
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  2. #2
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    Errr... run the fork you want to run, and use the axle interface that is appropriate. There really are no performance oriented pros/cons to any of those options unless you plan on doing huge drops or tricks on a rigid fork. If that is the case, and the fork is appropriate for the task at hand, it will likely have the right axle interface already.

    I think your concern is what prompted 'modern' forks to have oversize dropouts and lawyer lips... in the vast majority of cases, unneccessarily, IMO.

    That said, I have never had an issue with the actual interface of a QR on the front. I have bent a skewer a couple times, so prefer a solid nutted axle for riding long technical trails rigid.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunset1123
    Errr... run the fork you want to run, and use the axle interface that is appropriate. There really are no performance oriented pros/cons to any of those options unless you plan on doing huge drops or tricks on a rigid fork. If that is the case, and the fork is appropriate for the task at hand, it will likely have the right axle interface already.

    I think your concern is what prompted 'modern' forks to have oversize dropouts and lawyer lips... in the vast majority of cases, unneccessarily, IMO.

    That said, I have never had an issue with the actual interface of a QR on the front. I have bent a skewer a couple times, so prefer a solid nutted axle for riding long technical trails rigid.
    No, there is a huge advantage to running a fork with a better interface like the 15QR or 20MM stuff, especially on 29ers. Perhaps I did not specify a sus fork here.

    If you have not tried that set-up, it does make a difference.

    But, if I end up with an older, used fork to replace the M29, then it may be a Fox or something with traditional dropouts. I am not worried about the wheel falling off, I am looking to see if bolts are much of an improvement over 5mm QRs.

    Maybe I should just go with the easy solution...the Hope hub front and the 9MM conversion. Easy peezy.

    For some reason I cannot explain, I am drawn to the true SS freewheel rear hub set-up, despite its' drawbacks. Go figure.
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  4. #4
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    Ah... I see. I have fairly limited experience with suspension forks. I had one on my first mtb, and haven't used one since. I definitely prefer solid axle, bolt-on variety hubs front and rear, but haven't run into any issues with my current wheelset which uses standard QR. Clue me in: what changes when running suspension?

  5. #5
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    The sus fork allows for independant movement of the fork legs...twisting, etc, that is a typically not an issue on a rigid fork.
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  6. #6
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    See, I knew there was a reason I didn't run those contraptions... I'm sure that the twisting and slight changes in axial position would affect handling... although I probably couldn't tell with the fork moving around all over the place anyway. Thx for the info.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunset1123
    See, I knew there was a reason I didn't run those contraptions... I'm sure that the twisting and slight changes in axial position would affect handling... although I probably couldn't tell with the fork moving around all over the place anyway. Thx for the info.
    It does affect handling, no doubt. So does having the front wheel bounce off of the ground on rough trails with a rigid fork, but that part you already knew about
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