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  1. #1
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    Anyone using 22t/24t chainrings??

    So I destroyed an XT crank earlier this year by torquing the chainring bolt holes and tearing one off by riding with loose chainring bolts.

    Now planning on building up a second SS bikes with parts from the man cave. Any major cons to using a 22t/24t chainring on the "granny' ring part of the crank? Gearing looks ok to run with a 12t/13t cog. Saw the sub 15lb bike that is posted on the forums with small gear ratios so I know its possible, but wanted any comments from the experts!!

  2. #2
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    24t

    This boy works fine with a 24t crank and a 22t freewheel set up for steeeeeps ! Anyone using 22t/24t chainrings??-1118111015a.jpg
    Suicide by single speed. Work in progress.

  3. #3
    The need for singlespeed
    Reputation: zaskaranddriver's Avatar
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    It's often claimed that smaller cogs/rings wear faster.

  4. #4
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    Yeah, they wear faster and have less wrap, so they're more proven to skipping. Personally, I don't think it's worth the minimal weight savings.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic View Post
    Yeah, they wear faster and have less wrap, so they're more proven to skipping. Personally, I don't think it's worth the minimal weight savings.
    That makes sense. Not doing it for weight savings, just being cheap and trying to use my crank that I cant run a middle ring on!

  6. #6
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    If you're running a single speed freehub hub or a freewheel in the back, then you'll also have chain line issues if you run the chain ring on the granny mounts.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic View Post
    If you're running a single speed freehub hub or a freewheel in the back, then you'll also have chain line issues if you run the chain ring on the granny mounts.
    Thats what I was worried about! Planning on using a Cro29max wheelset, so thought I might make it.

    Might try and see if I can get chainline right before I get too excited and order the Surly 24t ring! Try it with an XT granny ring and a small cog off an old cassette..

  8. #8
    Dive Bomber
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    I run 22x13 and 24x15 for 3 month now and I have no issue with wear fast so far.

    CMIIW chain skip is when some chain link doesn't cover the teeth right? I mean not when the chain is off/derailed.

    Chain skip is rare issue but less happen when I uphill hammering, it only happen when I spin but I believe it's because my crank is ovaled so the chain tension is varies. Mostly happen after I fast spin and then I stop, when I restart sometimes it's skip.

    Chain wear is the same as when I run 32x20, 2 weeks after installed it getting stretch and change it after 1 month or if I get annoyed with chain skips.

    I use singlespeed specific cog with tall teeth so it works fine, also I use longer BB spindle so the chain doesn't scratch/touch the tire - I use 2.35 rear tire.

  9. #9
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    From The Information Hole | Surly Bikes


    Micro-drive vs. Macro-drive. The "Micro-drive" concept is bullsh*t on a single-speed. "Micro-drive", a term originally coined and trademarked by the dear departed Maeda Corporation (Suntour), refers to using a system of relatively smaller chainrings and cogs to achieve a similar gear ratio and range as could be achieved previously only with larger chainrings and cogs. "Micro-drive" was made possible at the time by the folks at Suntour by pushing the limits of cog size and making their cassettes with an 11t first position cog. While not a new idea, high-quality heat-treated steels allowed this design to be realized with some degree of success. Matching, lighter, smaller cogs and chainrings and shorter derailleur cages and chains gave the weight freaks something to jump up and down about, and the system actually sorta worked for the rest of us. Shimano copied and the rest is history - say hello to modern multi-speed MTB transmissions. The reason why it worked and still does is because you could get away with the smaller cogs for higher gears. Let's face it, most of us never spent (or spend) much time in the 11- and 12-tooth cogs so they don't wear all that fast. Furthermore, the time spent in these cogs wasn't ever under full-bore high-throttle. If it ever got so hard to pedal that you needed to stand up, you simply shifted to an easier gear. Had you rode around off-road in a 22x11t cross-gear, without a whole lot of effort you could blow the chain right over the top of those teeth regardless of how new or old your components were. If you didn't realize it, there's only roughly half of the amount of teeth on your cog engaging the chain at any given time. In the case of an 11 tooth cog, that's only 5 or 6 teeth at any given time! Unless your thighs are as big around as a Surly carpenter pencil, you will be able to make any low-gear transmission required for general one-speed off-road riding skip AT WILL, using an 11 tooth cog and its not so different for a 16 tooth cog, probably the smallest rear cog you might have on your one-speed ride. Considering that you don't shift, you'll be giving EIGHT teeth the full wrath of your wide load up the harshest vertical climbs you choose to attack. What my long-winded explanation is getting at is that more teeth are better when it comes to an off-road one-speed drivetrain. One tooth makes a huge difference out back with regards to preventing skippage. Wear life, too, is improved with more teeth. Since you never leave that gear, every mile you spin is on the same few teeth. Your drivetrain will last longer and will skip less and will launch the chain fewer times if you use larger cogs and chainrings. I recommend that you pick a big cog out back (18 teeth or larger) and experiment to find a gear ratio you like by varying your chainring sizes up front. The weight penalty here is practically non-existent; there is no benefit whatsoever to using a "Micro-drive" drivetrain on your one-speed off-road bike. Don't do it! It's dumb and you're gonna hurt yourself on a steep climb. If you have a Singleator: Keeping in mind everything written above, don't you think it's better to run your Singleator in the ˜pushing-up' position as opposed to the ˜pulling down' position? After all, by pushing the chain up, towards the freewheel, you increase the number of teeth engaging the freewheel for that given gear ratio. Unfortunately, this isn't always possible due to interference with the chainstays, but it is ideal. By the same token, it should now be obvious that since the Singleator does actually pull the chain away from the freewheel in the ˜pulling down' position that you want to minimize this as much as possible. Follow the instructions! Take out as many links as possible! Unlike a derailleur, the Singleator only has one pulley and wasn't designed to take up any more chain slack than absolutely necessary. And, in situations where you've "Micro-driven" your drivetrain, the ˜pull-down' position may never allow you have a sufficient number of teeth engaging the chain for your particular application, weight, or riding style. If you encounter a situation where you've taken out as many links as possible yet the Singleator still pulls the chain away from the freewheel far enough to cause skippage ("worst case scenario"), change your gear! Get a bigger cog! Get a bigger chainring! Try one tooth smaller on the chainring and take out another link! Re-arrange it, brahh!! You can do it! This worst-case scenario happens very rarely, but enough times to write this, so I hope I'm helping someone.

  10. #10
    one chain loop
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    when i converted this bike, i was running 24:12. it worked for couple days and the drag is very noticeable. the 12T cog from the cassette showed shark-toothing wear just after five rides.



    moved to 28/16, perfect gearing for snow. just waiting for my 28T BMX sprocket and replace the current biopace.



    i wouldn't go smaller than 15T again.
    everything sucks but my vacuum cleaner.

  11. #11
    bike rider
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    I was running a 22x12 but I was going through chains FAST so now I run a 26x15. It seems to spin with a little less effort but that could just be in my head. I thought the pic with red rims was running the 26x15 but I was wrong, sorry.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Anyone using 22t/24t chainrings??-img_0761.jpg  

    Anyone using 22t/24t chainrings??-img_0400.jpg  

    My Bikes Kick Ass!!!

  12. #12
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    I like micro drive for clearance and it's just like install and forget.
    I just put my foot to pedal and don't think about any drivetrain thing.

    I like my current ratio and will change it but I can't find any 19T cog here. 32x20 and 28x17 become too spinny to hammer for me.
    The only problem I want to change ratio is because my wheel is heavy for climb, but still changing ratio means change GPI which mean I have to spin more to get the same distance - it's alright for sit and spin but not good for hammering.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattkock View Post
    I was running a 22x12 but I was going through chains FAST so now I run a 26x15. It seems to spin with a little less effort but that could just be in my head. I thought the pic with red rims was running the 26x15 but I was wrong, sorry.
    Ahh the sub 15lb bike shows up!! This is what gave me the idea thanks!! If I can make the chainline work, I found a 26t chainring and gear ratio with the will be same as my 32x18 that I run on my Jabberwocky.

  14. #14
    Dinner for wolves
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    My riding buddy has been on a 22:13 for the past 2 months. I tooled up to do the same but never actually ran it... In any case, he has had no chain skip or resistance issues. His problem is chain stretch...which has been quite noticeable. I may stick with 28-30t chainring up front as a compromise.
    Responds to gravity

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