Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    29er and 26er
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    587

    Any pitfalls to switching back and forth between wheelsets?

    I found a good deal on craigs list for a second wheel set I plan on using on my sngle speed. I want a quick way to convert from single speed commuter bike to single speed mountain bike.

    My commuter mode will be a 36x16t with 2.3 Big Apple's

    My mountian bike mode will be a 36x18t or 36x20t with ??? Tires.

    I currently run mullet (Avid BB7 on front and Rim Brakes on the back)

    Are there any pitfalls I should be aware of in doing this? I think if I end up with 36x20T I may need a longer chain for this.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    88
    Been there, done that, didn't like it. If at all possible, get another bike. Switching wheels back and forth sounds good in theory but in practice it is a bit of pain in the behind. I have four bikes now.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    2,094
    Getting a vintage MTB for $50 would be a better idea. However, if the second wheelset is your only option, then it wouldn't be TOO bad. Things that will get annoying:

    - Brake alignment every time you change wheels.
    - Either getting a second chain or quick links to add onto your current chain.
    - Depending on your frame set up, re-aligning the tensioner. If you have track ends, then not a big deal.

    The chain "issue" is the least annoying, as you can do it fairly quick with SRAM powerlinks.

  4. #4
    29er and 26er
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    587
    Quote Originally Posted by Fatsinglespeeder View Post
    Been there, done that, didn't like it. If at all possible, get another bike. Switching wheels back and forth sounds good in theory but in practice it is a bit of pain in the behind. I have four bikes now.
    The N+1 syndrome has bit me and I have too many bikes as it is. The wife is getting concerned that we will have to buy a new house to keep all of our bikes in.

    The wheels are cheap enough so I'm going to get them any way. If its a pain in the @ss I will just keep the wheel set and wait for a good deal on a frame and build up yet another bike eventually.

    You can never have enought parts, can you?

  5. #5
    29er and 26er
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    587
    Quote Originally Posted by phsycle View Post
    Getting a vintage MTB for $50 would be a better idea. However, if the second wheelset is your only option, then it wouldn't be TOO bad. Things that will get annoying:

    - Brake alignment every time you change wheels.
    - Either getting a second chain or quick links to add onto your current chain.
    - Depending on your frame set up, re-aligning the tensioner. If you have track ends, then not a big deal.

    The chain "issue" is the least annoying, as you can do it fairly quick with SRAM powerlinks.
    Thanks! I always use the SRAM powerlinks. The BB7 is easy enough to adjust, and I'm thinking that if I keep the same exact chainline I won't have to re-align the tensioner. (No Track ends here)

    It still may end up a pain in the butt.... Time will tell

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    2,094
    I thought you had V-brakes out back? Not that those are hard to adjust....

  7. #7
    29er and 26er
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    587
    Quote Originally Posted by phsycle View Post
    I thought you had V-brakes out back? Not that those are hard to adjust....
    I would be swapping out the front wheel too. One would have a slick tread the other would have a dirt/mud tread. The BB-7 may have to be adjusted.

  8. #8
    Riding rigid
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    181
    If the new wheel has the same hub and you use the same brand and model for the rotor, you probably would not need to adjust the BB7. If they are different, you may need to shim one of the rotors outboard to match the other one. This way the front is a easy swap. Your rear is going to be the pain because of the change in gearing, you'll have to realign everything as others have stated. If its a formerly geared frame and you use a tensioner, then the switch would be easy.

  9. #9
    mnoutain bkie rdier
    Reputation: rydbyk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    2,768
    Same rim width will really help on the v brake side so you can avoid having to adjust the pads every time.

    Same hub the puts disc in EXACT same place inside calipers is a huge help too.

    You just need to approach this with the idea that you second wheelset set up needs to mimic the first nearly 100%.

    If it were a geared bike, you would clearly want the same cassette gearing.

  10. #10
    29er and 26er
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    587
    I bought the wheel-set last night, and they look barely used. I've ordered a new rotor and single-speed spacer kit and they should be here next week then the adventure begins.

    My frame is not a single speed specific frame-set so I use a tensioner to take up the slack on the chain so my rear brakes should not be a problem.

    When my parts come in I will get them all set up and see how things line up.

    Keeping my fingers crossed that this is not a huge pain in the butt. It shouldn't be. My worst case is I have an extra wheel-set to use on a future project.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Xavonseine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    51
    I did proceed the same way p08757, first buying a new set of wheels for my Kona Unit. It worked quite well with the track ends, keeping the same chain and without issues with the BB7 brakes alignment (32x18 with the mtb set, 32x15 with the commuter set).

    But it did not work for long as I quickly decided to build up a new commuter 40x15 from there.

    I am now renewing the experience with my cyclocross as I bought a new set of wheels to use it with slicks on the road... But with the same cassette and cantis that's pretty easy and quick. No desire to buy a road bike yet
    FG | SS | FS | CX

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Andy R's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    592
    What distance is your commute? If it's only four or five miles then I'd just use the same gearing that I was using off-road.
    Actually, thinking about it, I'd just use another bike all together. All this wheel swapping will get to be a pain in the ass pretty soon (or it would for me anyway).
    You say you've got a few bikes anyway - just dedicate one for commuting.

Similar Threads

  1. That's it! Switching back to 9-speed
    By camus in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 12-13-2012, 02:36 AM
  2. Switching from tubeless back to tubes?
    By MetaOrbit in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 09-02-2012, 09:22 PM
  3. Switching back and forth- 29-26
    By Woodman in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 08-10-2012, 10:57 AM
  4. switching back to platforms
    By brankulo in forum All Mountain
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 02-10-2012, 09:45 PM
  5. WWTP018: Pitfalls
    By jay_ntwr in forum Frame Building
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-25-2011, 08:32 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •