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  1. #1
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    advantages of SS specific hubs?

    are there any advantages to ss hubs over cassette hubs for a ss bike. i've got a cheap ss setup right now but looking to build a new rear soon.

    thanks

  2. #2
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    The flanges on a SS hub are typically a little wider making the wheel a bit stiffer. For me, I never really noticed much of a difference (I rode both). The most important thing for me was the engagement of the hub. I9, CK, Hope, DTSwiss, all had nice engagement. NoTubes also makes a SS hub that is reasonably priced with solid engagement. If you're going SS specific with no thoughts of swapping back and forth, I'd go SS specific.
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  3. #3
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    Less dish, slightly stronger wheel. Most importantly, I think it looks better.

  4. #4
    more skier than biker
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    A SS hub is more "core" You'll get less dissapproving looks from the mustachio'd and bearded set ;-)

  5. #5
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    They tend to use bolts instead of QR.

  6. #6
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    Some SS hubs have more engagement points than their cassette counterparts (Hope for example).

    No dish is nice for maintenance. Not sure I've ever really noticed a different in stability/flex between the two, but only having to have single sized replacement spokes for the rear is convenient.

  7. #7
    psycho cyclo addict
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    The FAQ has quite a bit of helpful info... MTBR.com Single Speed Forum - Single Speed FAQ

    Points of engagement for hubs are all over the place. In my experience, between Chris King, Stans and cheapy cup and cone design hubs makes no noticeable difference.

    Yes, botls are stiffer than QR but certainly not "standard" across SS rides. I find that using a bolt on (Halo) instead of a standard QR keeps my rigid steel 29er fork from loosening it up.

    A quality geared or SS wheel build will be plenty strong... with zero dish or not.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by edubfromktown View Post
    Points of engagement for hubs are all over the place. In my experience, between Chris King, Stans and cheapy cup and cone design hubs makes no noticeable difference.
    How are the differences in engagement not noticeable?

    Quote Originally Posted by edubfromktown View Post
    Yes, botls are stiffer than QR but certainly not "standard" across SS rides.
    Most SS hubs have bolts instead of QR. Nobody said anything about the front, or "rides".

  9. #9
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    I've got both sets and notice no advantage either way. So in the future, I'll buy geared just for the ease of resale.

  10. #10
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    The rear wheel dish is the only true advantage. But since I haven't had any issues with properly hand built rear 29er wheels with full cassette hubs it is minor at best. And my current rear wheel also uses the same spoke length drive and non-drive so even the maintenance "issue" is not existent.

    So in truth, there is really little to no reason to have a single speed rear unless it is a specific application like a White Industries Eno to adjust chain tension.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bike Whisperer View Post
    So in truth, there is really little to no reason to have a single speed rear unless it is a specific application like a White Industries Eno to adjust chain tension.
    SS hubs are "cooler"

  12. #12
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    I have SS rear hub simply because it had threaded axle and nuts. My 1X1 has horizontal drop outs and I just did not trust a QR hub, even with a chain tug. (And yes I tried it with my old wheels before I spent the cash to build a new set).

    With bolts and 2 chain tugs (just because) that rear wheel is not going anywhere!
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  13. #13
    I <3 29ers
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    Depending on the hub it maybe be more expensive than it's geared counterpart, thus potentially greater aiding in the positive restructuring of global economic well being.

    I ..... need ..... DIRT!!!!!

    ... and cookies.

  14. #14
    psycho cyclo addict
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneBadWagon View Post
    How are the differences in engagement not noticeable?

    Most SS hubs have bolts instead of QR. Nobody said anything about the front, or "rides".
    Not noticeable when riding. King's are 72 POE, Stan's 3.30 are 30 POE and the cup and cone hub who knows. I can stutter-climb (back pedal a bit to avoid a pedal strike or line up the power stroke for when it will be needed most and then mash) with any of them and don't notice a huge difference or feel like my rear wheel isn't "catching" in time to continue moving forward. In terms of durability, I'm sure the Kings will be around a lot longer...

    Dunno how many SS hubs have bolts- lots of older ones are QR. I mentioned the front because that is the only skewer I've managed to shake loose (on a geared bike). Bent a rear QR but haven't had one loosen so far.

    QR works fine on my 2010 SIR. Niner added a 142x12 rear on their new frame this year which would be where I'd go next...

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by fryed_1 View Post
    SS hubs are "cooler"
    Only for riders not comfortable with their own Single Speedness
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  16. #16
    metrotuned WoS
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    No advantage. Run both. Phil Wood Chris King Hope Paul DT Swiss Reynolds. If you go SS specific freewheel hub, you must run White Industries ENO freewheel - no argument.
    #willofthesun and author of the most viewed MTBR thread: Platform Pedal Shootout

  17. #17
    change is good
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    I feel SS hubs are better for clydes although I have no evidence proving so. I purchased my Phil Wood hub without the knowledge that I would require a free wheel. Ignorance is bliss - bullet proof so far with a WI free wheel.

  18. #18
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    We have a bomb-proof SS hub in the works that breaks away from the standard cassette body size spline. Our hub will use a larger diameter body with larger splines. You can see the beefy spline size it will use here Lunar Bikes - Single Speed Cogs

    The cogs will be the same as our Quick-cogs we have now that work on standard hubs. By using a larger diameter body, the ratchet system can also be larger which reduces the load making the parts stronger and last longer. It will have 88 POE for instant pedal reaction.

    It will use 30mm bearings with mounting for 20mm, 15mm, and QR axles. It will also have large diameter, wide spaced flanges for building a very strong wheel.

    The hub will be released early next year.

  19. #19
    cowbell
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    Certainly it looks like most stuff has been said regarding this, but I'll throw my two cents anyway. In my opinion, it really is all about the dish, or lack thereof. It's true, a well built wheel, nine times out of ten, it won't matter. But I guarantee that if you test the wheels to failure, all else being equal, the wheel with less or no dish will win time and time again. That said, I feel that the rear wheel of a SS is subject to more forces and stress than a geared bike, and as such want it built as strong as it can be.

    Immediate results may not be noticeable but it may show benefit a couple years down the road...er...trail...in terms of less maintenance and longer life.

    Taco - sounds interesting, keep us up to speed on happenings.

  20. #20
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    If I understood correctly; In his book The Bicycle Wheel, Jobst Brandt states that a wheel that is sufficiently strong (does not collapse) is also sufficiently stiff that we cannot feel wheel flex and he is talking about wheels that take gears. He is also possibly talking only about road wheels.

    This is not my experience. I've been wrong before but believe that I can feel flexible wheels, especially 29ers and especially in the back. If I were not a clyde, I would believe that better flange spacing might allow me to run a lighter rim. As it is, I'd like to have the strength.

  21. #21
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    Chicks dig it because it shows you are not afraid of commitment.

  22. #22
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    I did my experimenting years ago - These days if I want a SS wheel I build one with a SS hub. I'd rather ride a truly dedicated SS than feel like I am retro fitting something to make it work other than it's designed intentions. (not like it really matters)

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmmorath View Post
    Chicks dig it because it shows you are not afraid of commitment.
    Speak the truth!

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmmorath View Post
    Chicks dig it because it shows you are not afraid of commitment.
    Excellent!

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by bugshield View Post
    If I understood correctly; In his book The Bicycle Wheel, Jobst Brandt states that a wheel that is sufficiently strong (does not collapse) is also sufficiently stiff that we cannot feel wheel flex and he is talking about wheels that take gears. He is also possibly talking only about road wheels.

    This is not my experience. I've been wrong before but believe that I can feel flexible wheels, especially 29ers and especially in the back. If I were not a clyde, I would believe that better flange spacing might allow me to run a lighter rim. As it is, I'd like to have the strength.
    I had a rear road wheel that I could feel flex. One day while climbing a steep hill it whipped so far out of true I couldn't ride it. I had to stop and bang it straighter before I could finish riding home. So IME, if a rear wheel is really flexing you can make it fail. Just try harder.
    But if you close your eyes it becomes so easy to see

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