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  1. #1
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    29 x 2.4" rear tire

    I'm looking for a fatter rear tire. Currently, I'm on a 2.2 Saguaro which I love. I'm building up a rear wheel with a Velocity P-35 rim, and would prefer a 2.4" tire for the cush.

    I have not been able to find a good tire, though. I've got an Ardent up front, but I don't like it as a rear tire, because it slips too much on climbs. Same with Racing Ralphs, and Rampage (2.35). Any other suggestions for a grippy rear? I'm out in the rockies, so my trails are hardpack/loose dirt/gravel. Saguaro's have been excellent, but wish it had more girth. If not, I may just mount the Saguaro's on the P-35's.

  2. #2
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    Continental Mountain King 2.4

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    did you try flipping your ardent around?

    Other than those there aren't many 2.4's
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    interesting. I find the Ardent to be a great rear tire. 2.4 was a bit slow though.
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  5. #5
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    Specialized Purgatory is still available on their web page under "Outlet" in the large 29 x 2.4 Control version. I use it for a front tire with a 2.2" in the rear and it is big.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by stremf View Post
    I'm looking for a fatter rear tire. Currently, I'm on a 2.2 Saguaro which I love. I'm building up a rear wheel with a Velocity P-35 rim, and would prefer a 2.4" tire for the cush.

    I have not been able to find a good tire, though. I've got an Ardent up front, but I don't like it as a rear tire, because it slips too much on climbs. Same with Racing Ralphs, and Rampage (2.35). Any other suggestions for a grippy rear? I'm out in the rockies, so my trails are hardpack/loose dirt/gravel. Saguaro's have been excellent, but wish it had more girth. If not, I may just mount the Saguaro's on the P-35's.
    I use a Saguaro on the rear of my bike, and I also like it a lot. I also got a quote from Mikesee for a set of P35 wheels, but haven't pulled the trigger yet. I was thinking I was going to go Ardent as well. So I'm interested in your findings. Please be sure to post up your impressions of the wheel you are building, and whatever tire you decide to go with. It all sounds like what I want to hear about!

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    Also really like the Sagauro as a rear, and am currently digging the Gato (2.3) as a rear on a P-35.
    It has a bit more volume, better in the wet, faster than a Rampage, and so far has been durable.
    [found that I run higher psi using P-35's than w/ Flows]

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    I love the saguaro. The Ardent 2.4 rolls SLOW on the rear.

  9. #9
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    X-King?

    I love Saguaros as well and have them on 2 bikes and wanted to try something different on my belt SS so I am using the 2.4 Conti X-Kings and really like them so far. They seem to roll about as fast as my bikes with Saguaros and have nice volume.

    I DO run them with tubes I should mention so I cant attest to tubeless use and haven't run them for a real long time to attest as to speed of wear, but I havent even burned the whiskers off the center row of knobs and have quite a few miles on them so far, so wear looks like it might be good.

    They are certainly my second favorite to the Saguaro having used AKA's, Fast Tracks, Bronsons, ExiWolfs, and Controls. Was thinking of trying the Rampage on another bike and the Dissents are probobly too big for any of my H\T's if they are a true 2.5.

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  10. #10
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    Dude, if you're managing to spin a Rampage, I highly suggest you look at yourself as the culprit of this problem, seriously. Really nothing more to add since you already have two damn good tyres in the Ardent 2.4" and the Rampage, seriously, check yourself and also check your tyre pressures.

    Quote Originally Posted by stremf View Post
    I'm looking for a fatter rear tire. Currently, I'm on a 2.2 Saguaro which I love. I'm building up a rear wheel with a Velocity P-35 rim, and would prefer a 2.4" tire for the cush.

    I have not been able to find a good tire, though. I've got an Ardent up front, but I don't like it as a rear tire, because it slips too much on climbs. Same with Racing Ralphs, and Rampage (2.35). Any other suggestions for a grippy rear? I'm out in the rockies, so my trails are hardpack/loose dirt/gravel. Saguaro's have been excellent, but wish it had more girth. If not, I may just mount the Saguaro's on the P-35's.
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  11. #11
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    @ Bike Whisperer - I've actually had a Purgatory in 2.2. I still have it on the front on one of the bikes. I didn't like it that much as a rear tire. I seem to have problems with tires with big blocks as it seems to slip easier on climbs.

    @ Wish I Were Riding - will do. What bike are you putting the P35's on?

    Thanks for all other suggestions. I will put the X-king and Gato on the list to try.

    @ Lynx - I'm wondering if you've tried any of the above mentioned tires on your singlespeed. It's not THAT hard to spin any tire grinding up a steep climb on loose over hard. I've been lurking on the forums for quite a while and don't recall you having a singlespeed? Maybe I'm mistaken, though. Big difference between sit n spin having your full weight over the rear wheel vs standing on a SS.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by stremf View Post
    @ Wish I Were Riding - will do. What bike are you putting the P35's on?
    Well I was thinking of putting the P35 front wheel on my SS, and the rear wheel on the back of my Jones...

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch rides a SS View Post
    Continental Mountain King 2.4
    Grippy yes but they are anemic (on a Stan's Flow rim) compared to a Racing Ralph 2.4 or an Ardent.

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    Weirwolf 2.55 maybe? First Gen WWLT 2.55's were closer to 2.35 - 2.4. Not sure about the new UST ones. Similar pattern to Saguaros but fatter.

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    I'll check out the Weirwolf as well. I'm liking the tread design, as I think the smaller knobs work better for me than bigger knobs.

  16. #16
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    I had a Hans Dampf 2.35 on my Kona, calipers said it was 2.4 at it's widest, and appeared to be larger than the Spec. Purgatory I had on the front. No traction complaints, bit heavy I suppose.

  17. #17
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    All I was saying, was that you're managing to spin out some of the more aggressive patterns out there that still roll pretty decently, next step would be to the stuff that rolls like tar. I've never and probably will never ride a SS, just don't see the point of walking climbs I could make if I had various gears, or having to sit and coast on descents I could pedal on with various gears. I have however tried climbing in a fixed, hard gear and I know that with ****ty technique I'd spin out, but with a consistent, even stroke I had much better chances of making the climb.

    Quote Originally Posted by stremf View Post
    @ Lynx - I'm wondering if you've tried any of the above mentioned tires on your singlespeed. It's not THAT hard to spin any tire grinding up a steep climb on loose over hard. I've been lurking on the forums for quite a while and don't recall you having a singlespeed? Maybe I'm mistaken, though. Big difference between sit n spin having your full weight over the rear wheel vs standing on a SS.
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    All I was saying, was that you're managing to spin out some of the more aggressive patterns out there that still roll pretty decently, next step would be to the stuff that rolls like tar. I've never and probably will never ride a SS, just don't see the point of walking climbs I could make if I had various gears, or having to sit and coast on descents I could pedal on with various gears. I have however tried climbing in a fixed, hard gear and I know that with ****ty technique I'd spin out, but with a consistent, even stroke I had much better chances of making the climb.
    So you're saying there is no difference in traction whether you're climbing standing or sitting?
    Last edited by stremf; 12-11-2012 at 02:24 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    All I was saying, was that you're managing to spin out some of the more aggressive patterns out there that still roll pretty decently, next step would be to the stuff that rolls like tar. I've never and probably will never ride a SS, just don't see the point of walking climbs I could make if I had various gears, or having to sit and coast on descents I could pedal on with various gears. I have however tried climbing in a fixed, hard gear and I know that with ****ty technique I'd spin out, but with a consistent, even stroke I had much better chances of making the climb.
    Wow, your credibility just took a nose dive. You've got virtually zero SS experience. Not only that, you don't "see the point" of SS. Why are you here? To troll? I'd give you a neg rep for this if I could.

  20. #20
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    Lets not bash LyNx for stating a fact. I've run a RaRa, Crossmark, Jones XDX, Wolverine, and a Quasi Moto on my SS. I honestly lose traction more spinning on a granny gear on my geared ride (i suck at pedaling circles) than i do on my SS. Standing or mashing is all balance, traction, and leverage. Even with the short knobs on the Quasi i would rarely spin. If i do, its too steep and loose for traction on my gears anyways.

    Summarize- Good gear will help the rider, but, bad gear will multiply the riders flaws. I know this too well. Don't blame a tire for your inability to use its traction.

  21. #21
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    You do have reading comprehension issues don't you? Did you see me mention standing or sitting anywhere in my reply? NO. I mentioned bad technique and if you're too studly to man up and think that maybe for a second you have bad technique, then whatever, get yourself a monster tyre to make up for it and drag that around.

    Quote Originally Posted by stremf View Post
    So you're saying there is no difference in traction whether you're climbing standing or sitting?
    Because I don't ride, nor never will ride an SS, I have no experience about good or bad technique because geared riders don't sometimes stand and mash over hills in stupid hard gears for whatever reason No trolling, I browse new posts and saw this guy spinning out what I consider to be some damn aggressive tyres and was interested, but you go ahead and do what you feel like.

    Quote Originally Posted by phsycle View Post
    Wow, your credibility just took a nose dive. You've got virtually zero SS experience. Not only that, you don't "see the point" of SS. Why are you here? To troll? I'd give you a neg rep for this if I could.
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    Hans Dampf Trailstar.

    Before these I was running Ardent 2.4s tubeless, at sub 30 psi. When I put the HDs on there, big upgrade. They certainly don't spin as much climbing over edges, and are better on loose stuff. The non directional design is also nicer. Now I can have a really grippy rear for mashing over stuff (this is on a SS), and not get poor, slidy rear braking like what you get with a reversed Ardent.

    But mostly, they rock because they're a lot more forgiving than the Ardents. They can regain traction after a little sliding much better than the Ardents. And they don't have the sketchy transition area.

    Another bonus for me is that they're quieter on pavement. And since they're triple compound, I think the middle is a little harder than the Ardents, but the edges softer. The third compound is under the surface as a base layer.

    I really recommend them. I thought the fat Ardents were the ****, but these are another level. They're expensive and might wear a bit quicker, but the ride is fantastic.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    You do have reading comprehension issues don't you? Did you see me mention standing or sitting anywhere in my reply? NO.
    .
    You do know that virtually ALL singlespeeders stand when climbing, right? In this SS forum, that's just assumed. You will obviously agree standing means less traction. Spinning the rear is not that hard to do, unlike what you ASSUMED and blamed it all on bad technique. Did you think for a second maybe the guy's a seasoned vet with no issues with his/her form?

    Again, you don't ride SS, so you have no grounds to be dishing out advise.


    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    Because I don't ride, nor never will ride an SS, I have no experience about good or bad technique...
    Please do yourself a favor and stop your bs. I don't go into the DH forum and give out advise, because I have almost no experience in that dicipline. Your experiences with sit and spin in granny gear doesn't apply here. Is that hard to comprehend??

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by stremf View Post
    I'm looking for a fatter rear tire. Currently, I'm on a 2.2 Saguaro which I love. I'm building up a rear wheel with a Velocity P-35 rim, and would prefer a 2.4" tire for the cush.

    I have not been able to find a good tire, though. I've got an Ardent up front, but I don't like it as a rear tire, because it slips too much on climbs. Same with Racing Ralphs, and Rampage (2.35). Any other suggestions for a grippy rear? I'm out in the rockies, so my trails are hardpack/loose dirt/gravel. Saguaro's have been excellent, but wish it had more girth. If not, I may just mount the Saguaro's on the P-35's.
    Nobby Nic 2.35.

  25. #25
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    Thanks. I'll also put Hans Damf and Nobby Nic on the list. Might have to start a fundraiser to test all these out!

    Lynx - Sounds like you need to go for a relaxing ride and work off that stress!

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by phsycle View Post
    You do know that virtually ALL singlespeeders stand when climbing, right? In this SS forum, that's just assumed. You will obviously agree standing means less traction. Spinning the rear is not that hard to do, unlike what you ASSUMED and blamed it all on bad technique. Did you think for a second maybe the guy's a seasoned vet with no issues with his/her form?

    Again, you don't ride SS, so you have no grounds to be dishing out advise.

    Please do yourself a favor and stop your bs. I don't go into the DH forum and give out advise, because I have almost no experience in that dicipline. Your experiences with sit and spin in granny gear doesn't apply here. Is that hard to comprehend??
    I guess I'm the only SSer who is going to side with Lynx here. Standing and climbing is all about keeping your weight balanced over the tires to maximize traction and keep the front wheel down on the ground. This is the same whether you're on a singlespeed or on a geared bike running the optimal gear for that climb. It's so much easier to spin if you're on a geared bike running lower gears . . .

    If you're spinning out a really aggressive rear tire, maybe think to get your weight back over the saddle while standing, or even pulling up on the bars as you push down with your pedals (really digs the back tire into the ground).

    Sounds like you're leaning way over the handlebars to make the climbs and in general shifting your weight too far forward when standing and mashing. I think this is a rider technique issue, not a hardware issue since the OP has already mentioned running some of the knobbiest rubber available.

    Focus on the technique and run the fastest rolling rear tire you can get away with so you can maximize your speed and efficiency since you've only got one gear.

  27. #27
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    I agree with others that this is mostly about technique. If the OP can spin a big old heavy moto-like Rampage, he needs to work on skills and get his weight back on climbs. I run micro knob rear tires (SB8 and AKA) and can still almost always maintain traction (SB8 can be tricky, AKA is much better). Wide bars and shorter stems can help move the weight back.

    If anything the OP needs to run a micro knob for a few months to force technique development. I started SSing in the winter on a SB8 and learned rather quickly about weight distribution.

  28. #28
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    I've been on a SS for 6 yrs now. I don't consider myself an expert by any means and I'm sure we can all improve our techniques. Most of the time, I don't have issues with losing grip. It's those 6-700 ft in a mile climbs with loose stuff that gets me in trouble. I can surely walk, but what's the fun in that?

    My current climbing form is head down, hind end up and over the saddle. I found this gets some good weight to the back. But even with this, I was spinning out with the other tires. Been solid on the Saguaro.

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    Quote Originally Posted by stremf View Post
    I've been on a SS for 6 yrs now. I don't consider myself an expert by any means and I'm sure we can all improve our techniques. Most of the time, I don't have issues with losing grip. It's those 6-700 ft in a mile climbs with loose stuff that gets me in trouble. I can surely walk, but what's the fun in that?

    My current climbing form is head down, hind end up and over the saddle. I found this gets some good weight to the back. But even with this, I was spinning out with the other tires. Been solid on the Saguaro.
    How do you spin a rampage and not the saguaro? For me head down is not as good as a standing position - I stand and mash almost like I'm hiking up the hill. I can stand for long periods of time in this upright position.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    How do you spin a rampage and not the saguaro? For me head down is not as good as a standing position - I stand and mash almost like I'm hiking up the hill. I can stand for long periods of time in this upright position.
    Same. And I try to pull up on the bars with my arms as it lets me both push harder on the pedals as well as shift weight onto the back tire.

  31. #31
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    ****ty technique is ****ty technique, whether you're SSing, riding gears, riding or FS, sitting or standing, if you put down un-even power you will generally break/loose traction. If you don't yet know how to "spin" smoothly while standing that's not my fault, don't try to defend yourself or others because of it, it's something you'll learn as you continue to ride and grow as an MTBer.

    Spinning and applying even power during your pedal strokes to keep the power going to the wheels consistent is not something one normally picks up straight away, so give yourself some time, you'll maybe get it one day. One tip, core strength is THE key to being able to do this, so work on that and it'll probably come to you quicker ;-)

    Oh and YES, you can stand on a geared bike, believe it or not, you can even push a stupid hard gear if you so desire, there are no laws that say if you run gears that you have to stay seated while climbing - FYI this also goes for rigid or FS

    Quote Originally Posted by phsycle View Post
    You do know that virtually ALL singlespeeders stand when climbing, right? In this SS forum, that's just assumed. You will obviously agree standing means less traction. Spinning the rear is not that hard to do, unlike what you ASSUMED and blamed it all on bad technique. Did you think for a second maybe the guy's a seasoned vet with no issues with his/her form?

    Again, you don't ride SS, so you have no grounds to be dishing out advise.

    Please do yourself a favor and stop your bs. I don't go into the DH forum and give out advise, because I have almost no experience in that dicipline. Your experiences with sit and spin in granny gear doesn't apply here. Is that hard to comprehend??
    That would be a quite pertinent bit of info to have put in your OP, would give everyone a much better idea as to exactly what's going on. This being said, yeah that's some steep stuff, we have quite a bit of steep climbs like that here and perfect technique along with the appropriate tyre is all that will get you up them. I still stand by your technique being flawed and your pedal stroke probably having some un-eveness to it where you're putting down additional torque somewhere in it.

    I don't SS as I said, but I've done my share of climbing in stupid hard gears on loose stuff and perfect technique is all that got me up it - e.g. Had FD trouble while riding with visiting friends, was riding my rigid KM which is normally my "road" bike, so geared accordingly 34/46 rings, 25-12 cassette, made a climb (same sort as you're describing) in 34-25, WW LT Rear and Rampage Front. I couldn't believe it, but like you, it's a climb I can make normally and wasn't going to let some gear issue stop me from trying, but I'll tell you, I could feel my entire core engaged all thew way up as I balance my weight and shifted it as necessary, all the while keeping the power going smoothly to the cranks and hence wheels.

    Quote Originally Posted by stremf
    I've been on a SS for 6 yrs now. I don't consider myself an expert by any means and I'm sure we can all improve our techniques. Most of the time, I don't have issues with losing grip. It's those 6-700 ft in a mile climbs with loose stuff that gets me in trouble. I can surely walk, but what's the fun in that?

    My current climbing form is head down, hind end up and over the saddle. I found this gets some good weight to the back. But even with this, I was spinning out with the other tires. Been solid on the Saguaro.
    Last edited by LyNx; 12-12-2012 at 11:14 AM.
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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTscoob View Post
    I guess I'm the only SSer who is going to side with Lynx here. Standing and climbing is all about keeping your weight balanced over the tires to maximize traction and keep the front wheel down on the ground. This is the same whether you're on a singlespeed or on a geared bike running the optimal gear for that climb. It's so much easier to spin if you're on a geared bike running lower gears . . .

    If you're spinning out a really aggressive rear tire, maybe think to get your weight back over the saddle while standing, or even pulling up on the bars as you push down with your pedals (really digs the back tire into the ground).

    Sounds like you're leaning way over the handlebars to make the climbs and in general shifting your weight too far forward when standing and mashing. I think this is a rider technique issue, not a hardware issue since the OP has already mentioned running some of the knobbiest rubber available.

    Focus on the technique and run the fastest rolling rear tire you can get away with so you can maximize your speed and efficiency since you've only got one gear.
    Nope, I'm with you. For me, losing traction on a steep climb is almost always my fault and not my tires (2.25 Ardent rear/2.4 front). I would run the 2.4 in the back for the extra cush, but it doesn't fit
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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTscoob View Post
    Same. And I try to pull up on the bars with my arms as it lets me both push harder on the pedals as well as shift weight onto the back tire.
    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    How do you spin a rampage and not the saguaro? For me head down is not as good as a standing position - I stand and mash almost like I'm hiking up the hill. I can stand for long periods of time in this upright position.
    Of course, standing and being able to use body weight helps. But on the steep stints, my front will wander like crazy if I stand upright. The head down counter acts this and the butt over the saddle helps keep the weight to the rear.

    On less steep ascents, stand and churn works well. I rarely have issues with slipping on those type of climbs. However, my experience is that the Ardents/Rampage slipped in places where the Saguaros just climbed right up. Same pressure, same rim, same psi (around 20).

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    Quote Originally Posted by GTscoob View Post
    I guess I'm the only SSer who is going to side with Lynx here. Standing and climbing is all about keeping your weight balanced over the tires to maximize traction and keep the front wheel down on the ground. This is the same whether you're on a singlespeed or on a geared bike running the optimal gear for that climb. It's so much easier to spin if you're on a geared bike running lower gears . . .

    If you're spinning out a really aggressive rear tire, maybe think to get your weight back over the saddle while standing, or even pulling up on the bars as you push down with your pedals (really digs the back tire into the ground).

    Sounds like you're leaning way over the handlebars to make the climbs and in general shifting your weight too far forward when standing and mashing. I think this is a rider technique issue, not a hardware issue since the OP has already mentioned running some of the knobbiest rubber available.

    Focus on the technique and run the fastest rolling rear tire you can get away with so you can maximize your speed and efficiency since you've only got one gear.
    I agree with LyNx as well. I spin out more on my full squish geared bike than my rigid SS. Same rear tire on both, but my pedal stroke is closer to an epileptic primate than anything else. The tougher gear on the SS takes away some of the torque spikes and helps it stay hooked up more. If I ride a tougher gear on the geared bike I get the same affect.

  35. #35
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    Lynx has good points, but I believe that SS requires a more aggressive rear tire than geared for the same sort of conditions and rider. I think of all the times I've been struggling up a hill at very low cadence, maybe just above 30, when I had to get over some loose edge or root or something.

    When you're mashing up a hill, you often can just get that push you need right on the most powerful part of your stroke, but it's not gonna ever be smooth. That's why you need these aggressive tires. You can only "spin" standing up if you're going fast enough. Any steep hills, and you're not going to be able to get some spinning action because you'll be going too slowly.

    I did find that when I was mashing up a hill, and I concentrated about also pulling up on the pedals much more than usual (with clipless), that I could power through hills more smoothly. Not sure how your technique is, but maybe putting some more effort and concentration about adding power with your upstroke could sure help.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    ****ty technique is ****ty technique, whether you're SSing, riding gears, riding or FS, sitting or standing, if you put down un-even power you will generally break/loose traction. If you don't yet know how to "spin" smoothly while standing that's not my fault, don't try to defend yourself or others because of it, it's something you'll learn as you continue to ride and grow as an MTBer. .
    Ride and grow as a MTBer. Yes, I'm continuing to learn each ride. Even with 15 years under my belt, I learn something new each season.

    Now, that said, I still get a laugh out of people trying to dish out advise with no experience in that field. Yeah, you may consider yourself a MtBer, but you're a granny shiftin', nuggets on the saddle, double boinger gearie. Your opinion has no relevance here. And really, taking away the condescending remarks, the only thing you've really said is, "hey, you've got bad technique." Yeah, everyone's a critic. How about offering up some solutions? Since you're so focused on technique, what is the perfect climbing technique? Looking forward to another response with total lack of personal experience behind it.


    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    Spinning and applying even power during your pedal strokes to keep the power going to the wheels consistent is not something one normally picks up straight away, so give yourself some time, you'll maybe get it one day. One tip, core strength is THE key to being able to do this, so work on that and it'll probably come to you quicker .
    See how much of your ignorance is shining in this post? Even power during the stroke? Even if you've got legs like Cavendish, you're not even close to getting even power throughout your stroke. It's almost impossible on a SS (on a steep climb). You're barely just working to get the crank up and over without stalling.

    Core strength is important. I rock climb and do sit ups, which seem to help me quite a bit. But I appreciate yet another condescending remark. Especially from some softie on a FS with a bad back.

    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    Oh and YES, you can stand on a geared bike, believe it or not, you can even push a stupid hard gear if you so desire...
    Yeah, no kidding Sherlock. But YOU can't!
    Last edited by phsycle; 12-12-2012 at 07:22 PM.

  37. #37
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    I use the Gato 29 x 2.3, Measures 2 3/8 inches on WTB i23 rim, tubeless. I love the GATO. Justin runs Nobby Nic 2.35 and those tires are meaty, simple, and he blazed at Downieville! Those Nobby Nic tires looked wider than mine.

  38. #38
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    Stremf, it would seem that you get on better with a micro knob tyre, so maybe the WW LT you were thinking about might be a good choice. I've had my original WW LT surprise me a time or two when I thought for sure it wouldn't offer traction, both going up and down, but the Rampage has always performed better for me and hence my original comments.

    Ah, Phsycle, you know I was wondering why all the hate when it seemed everyone else seems to more or less agree with me, but now I remember why, still upset over the NEG rep I gave you for similar, stupid comments in another thread, poor boy, why don't you get over it. Just because you've been at something for so long doesn't make you anything but a long time engager of the activity.

    As to suggestion, I did, try harder with better technique to keep a more even power stroke and despite your lack of having the ability to do that, maybe the OP will take the advice and give it a go and see if concentrating harder on this while climbing these climbs helps - you being special, obviously it would be hard for, so you're excused
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  39. #39
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    Nice cop out. If you remember, after you gave me the neg rep, I returned the favor with a POS rep to show how much I really cared about your neg rep. Thanks for at least signing it.

    My remarks are a direct response to your idiotic posts in this very thread--nothing else. Have a good day.

  40. #40
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    All this bickering and the fact still remains, an Ardent will provide excellent grip for climbs if your technique is adjusted to dig that tire into the dirt. It might not be as good as the Saguaro for climbing and rolling resistance, but, its got good bite. And, imo, the Ardent has better grip leaning hard into corners, loose leafy terrain, wet (not mud), and stronger sidewalls.

    As for your original request if you need a tire to compensate for technique, there really aren't many options. The Saguaro is a 2.2 . You could try the AKA for micro knobs & 2.2. Racing Ralph in 2.4. Hans Dampf 2.35. Nobby Nic 2.35. I actually like the Ikon 2.2 for a front and rear. The Ikon is a bit skinny though.

    No tire is going to be the "do everything" tire. The rider has to compensate for the side effects of the attributes each tread/tire has. Many SSers can get grip from much less knobs than both of those tires (Saguaro and Ardent). With the amount of loose over hardpack here in SoCal, i've seen how little tread it takes to power up loose steeps. That is, if the rider has the skill to do it.

  41. #41
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    yeah,interesting. I find the Ardent to be a great rear tire. 2.4 was a bit slow though.

  42. #42
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    Conti X- King 2.4 is an excellent tire. Great Volume, traction, side knob, and rolling speed. I'm running it tubeless front and rear. It seals up well and has never sliced. Very popular tire for the rocky, loose conditions I ride.

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