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  1. #1
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    1995 Schwinn HighTmber convert

    Greetings all SS'ers. First post, been lurking and gathering info here for awhile. I've decided to take on an SS full rigid project from an old bike I've had since 95. It's a 95 Schwinn HighTmber 100year anniversary edition. Not sure what that means, and I cant find any info related to this bike. It's an aluminum frame with rigid fork.

    My question is to those that know this bike if it's worth dumping
    serious money toward making it an SS. I wanna keep the paint
    and decals stock. It has a lot of sentimental value over the last
    20 years of me and my son sharing this bike on many rides
    together.

    Or should I just go purchase a dedicated SS frame?

    And for a bonus, shoot me some component ideas if you have the
    time. I'm a 5'10" 210lbs. rider.

    Many thanks!

  2. #2
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    I really have no idea what you mean by serious money. I don't think you would want to spend a ton until you know you like it, then perhaps buy a dedicated SS and give the Schwing to you son. In your case, get a conversion kit and drop off all but 1 chain ring. Boom, done. Now go ride.

    Super cheapy version, choose a comfortable gear and resist all temptation to shift while riding.
    No fuss with the MUSS

  3. #3
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    I'm not familiar with that one in particular but a lot of bikes from that era were lacking in tire clearance and ridged SS to me means fat, high volume tires. Also consider what kind or rear dropouts it has and what your options are for chain tensioning and gearing. You don't necessarily have to spend "serious money" on a project like that in order to end up with a fun bike IMO.

  4. #4
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    Hey thanks guys for chimming in. Yeah, done that alot, pick one
    gear and rode like crazy, I love it and I want to build a nice set up.
    The older Schwinn I was talking about came with x2.25, plenty
    enough I do believe. Beside, this project was gonna be for a town
    racer and occasional fire road rider. It has the older style stem and
    I wanna convert that as well to modern stem and bars.
    Cantilever of coarse. Nice wheels as well because those
    are pushing twenty year old.

    Like I said earlier, I thought about just going with a 26 dedicated
    Lynskey frame if the old schwinn was not worth it. Thanks again.

  5. #5
    1*14*29*2.1 & 1*1*29*2.4
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    Not familiar with your frame...but once you start getting nice wheelsets and components, I would probably start looking at a new frame. Having said that, if the bike has sentimental value I fully understand. A new nike won't necessarily be more fun, especially for what use you have in mind. I restored my 30y/o Italian steel roadie and modernised it with new campag....I love it to death....but I better not try a new carbon one I may need another bike.

  6. #6
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    The closest I could find was the Bikpedia reference for the 1994 Schwinn High Timber, which was Tange butted chromo and has STX components.

    A lot of people ask about throwing money at parts for a certain bike and whether it is false economy and all that and you know what, I don't think it's a relevant question. Here's why: a 5mm allen key makes bikes somewhat modular.

    Yep, whatever parts you buy can be transferred to another bike. Obviously there are exceptions, like seatpost, front derailleur , seatpost clamp and the 256 headset and stem standards that exist. But the thing is, if you want to buy a tensioner and some other bits then go for it. They can always be used on something else.

    There's no harm in taking a beloved old bike and giving it new life. If you find you like SS but the bike has limitations, then your next step is looking for a dedicated SS.

    As suggested above, you don't need to spend big dollars. Lose the big and little chainrings, bust up a cassette for a single cog on the rear which is approximately half the number of teeth as the chainring, a spacer kit (or even pvc pipe cut to fit) and you can even use the rear derailleur as a tensoner.

    Anyway, why are you still reading this, get into the shed and start converting!

    Grumps

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by finch2 View Post
    Not familiar with your frame...but once you start getting nice wheelsets and components, I would probably start looking at a new frame.
    This is more or less what happened to me, not that it's a bad thing. I also have a couple older rides that are now too small but am sentimental about. I keep'em going, but I don't upgrade components. Also, you mention upgrading the older style stem. Do I interpret that correctly to mean you have a threaded setup and now you want to move to threadless? I would be wary about using the stock fork, most likely the steerer tube won't be long enough to get you to the position you want and I imagine the threadless stem would be more likely to slip on the threads. Finally, Lynskey >>> Schwinn. That could be serious money though but it doesn't mean you get rid of the Schwinn. Happy rollin'!
    No fuss with the MUSS

  8. #8
    one chain loop
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Grumpy View Post
    There's no harm in taking a beloved old bike and giving it new life. If you find you like SS but the bike has limitations, then your next step is looking for a dedicated SS.

    As suggested above, you don't need to spend big dollars. Lose the big and little chainrings, bust up a cassette for a single cog on the rear which is approximately half the number of teeth as the chainring, a spacer kit (or even pvc pipe cut to fit) and you can even use the rear derailleur as a tensoner.

    Grumps
    i converted my first SS six years ago and never looked back. this was my bike back when i was a poor working student.. i still have this bike due to sentimental value as well.

    everything sucks but my vacuum cleaner.

  9. #9
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    fishcreek, is that a Rocky?
    No fuss with the MUSS

  10. #10
    one chain loop
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbhammercycle View Post
    fishcreek, is that a Rocky?
    yes, a RM cardiac. to the OP, don't feel bad upgrading it, its value is not measurable especially if it means so much to you. here's mine as it sits right now, won't believe it's the same bike.

    everything sucks but my vacuum cleaner.

  11. #11
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    heart stopper.

    I agree, no bike is only or simply the sum of its parts.
    No fuss with the MUSS

  12. #12
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    Thanks everyone. There more I should say to the rest of you, but I cant find the words this late at night. Will definitely put more thought into this project. Cheers.

    BTW...nice looking Rocky and I like the history just as much.

  13. #13
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    Fish is dead on. I always err (or "correct"?!?) on the side of "intrinsic value". What it is worth to it's owner really. If it has sentimental value for whatever reason (fish's RM) or maybe finding a model you always wanted as a kid, or even one like the one you had as a kid...it's YOUR money, throw all you want at it...or don't. Use stuff that's laying around, or fabricate or whatever, it's your choice. I got back into cycling heavily quite awhile back rebuilding a wadded up Trek 4900 that wasn't worth the $ in the "business" sense, but the fun I had doing it and the fact it got me active again after a hiatus made it worth a million dollars and could I have weasled 29" tires into it's frame, I would still have it but I'm really big so I don't. I wished I did though LOL.

    Point is, if it makes you happy when you ride it, if it inspires you to ride, or just makes you laugh for whatever reason, it's YOUR bike and you are riding. It doesn't have to be worth ANYTHING to ANYBODY else unless you're building it to sell (why would someone do that??? I can never part with one I've built but maybe I'm goofy).

    I always use my friend Dave as the example. He say's of my lime green Chuck's..."I like those shoes. Those shoes say "F*ck You, they are MY shoes!"."

    For what it's worth....

    P.S. yeah, that RM has been in my bike porn folder for awhile too LOL
    Where there is choice, there is misery...

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