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  1. #1
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    X-Post: Review of mtnbiker4life's shock bushing tool


  2. #2
    "El Whatever"
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    Please post it here directly. Maybe AM will do a sticky out of it... it's pure gold!
    Check my Site

  3. #3
    Nightriding rules SuperModerator
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    yeah...awesome work, Flip!

  4. #4
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    The unabridged version....

    If you slightly lift up the saddle of 575 and hear a knocking or looseness kinda noise, make sure all the suspension bolts are tight, your rear wheel's bearings are not loose and your saddle is tight on the seatpost. If the sound and sensation is still there, it's more than likely your shock's bushings.
    Here is what it would sound like (turn up the volume):


    I'm not including the steps to remove the shock from the bike and the dogbone as that was already covered on a different thread.

    Step 1- Gather all the tools you will need. In this case, a bushing tool. This tool is made by mtbr member "mtnbiker4life" and he sells it in the classifieds along with bushings for different manufacturers. It is very well made and I highly recommended it to the DIY crowd! Also shown are the assorted tools needed to remove the shock from the Yeti and it's dogbone linkage.



    Here is a picture of the old bushing prior to removal.


    Step 2- Insert the Ejector Pin through the bushing and slide the bushing guide on the other side with the counter bore facing the shock so as to capture the bushing once it's pressed out by the pin.



    I used a vise to press the bushing out out of the shock eyelet and into the counter bore.


    The bushing presses out pretty easily using the vise.


    Note that the bushing has been pressed out of the shock's eyelet and into the counterbore on the other side.


    Step 3- Installing a new bushing
    Clean the eyelet.


    Lightly grease the pin


    Put the new bushing on the pin


    Lightly grease the bushing


    Place the support foot (the end cap) into the counter bore of the bushing guide (the counter bore will not be directly against the shock during the bushing installation).


    Make sure that the slit in the bushing is facing away from the shock body (or facing the back of the bike).


    Put the tool into the vise and slowly press the new bushing in.


    Halfway in


    Done



    Step 4- Put the shock back on the bike and torque all bolts to spec.

    Test. No more bushing slop


    Total time was 10 minutes to remove the shock and dog bone, 5 minutes to remove and install a new bushing and another 10 minutes to reinstall the dog bone and put the shock back on the bike....

  5. #5
    The Bubble Wrap Hysteria
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    This is a great illustration on this tools use. The 12mm bushing tool is now available as seen side-by-side with the 1/2 inch bushing tool.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #6
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    +1! Another VERY happy user of this tool.

  7. #7
    May contain nuts
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    Got the new black 12mm tool for Manitou shocks. A thing of beauty and a joy forever. Stop messing with sockets and get one.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haggis
    Got the new black 12mm tool for Manitou shocks. A thing of beauty and a joy forever. Stop messing with sockets and get one.
    Well I did order the 1/2" version, should be here any day, I will comment back once mine comes in as I need to change out the DU's on my Roco.

    Just picked up an Manitou Evolver ISX-6, so I guess I will need the 12mm DU tool for that now or at least down the road when the DU's wear.

    Cheers
    J

  9. #9
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    I finally used the bushing tool that I bought from mtnbiker4life some time back.

    A few minutes and I was done. Thank you for making a quality tool that works this well.

  10. #10
    Powered by ice cream.
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    Yep, works great. Just the tool for the job.
    Quote Originally Posted by buddhak
    And I thought I had a bike obsession. You are at once tragic and awesome.

  11. #11
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    Agreed, great tool. I picked one up a while back but haven't needed to use it yet.

  12. #12
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    I bought one last week and used it yesterday. It is an awesome tool, very well made and extremely easy to use. Only took about 10-15 minutes to swap out the bushings. The play that was once there is now gone.

  13. #13
    moaaar shimz
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    Yeah I used it too and it took like 3-4 minutes. Great tool.

  14. #14
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    why are you using grease on the bushing?
    That isn't a good idea according to the folks at Romic and my LBS....

  15. #15
    Amphibious Technologies
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qman
    why are you using grease on the bushing?
    That isn't a good idea according to the folks at Romic and my LBS....

    Agreed. I did that once and dirt got in the bushing and actually decreased life of bushing. Never again. I run them dry and they last much longer.
    "The best you've ridden is the best you know" - Paul Thede, Race Tech

  16. #16
    The Bubble Wrap Hysteria
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCUBAPRO
    Agreed. I did that once and dirt got in the bushing and actually decreased life of bushing. Never again. I run them dry and they last much longer.
    The manufacture of the bushings states these can be run dry or lubricated since the ones I sell have a small percentage of lead which increases lubricity. As stated our application is exposed to the elements so adding anything that will make dirt/sand stick to it would not be good.

    During my testing I ran them lubricated and dry. It did not make a difference. I've even removed them and reinstalled them to do more testing. In my years of testing these on bikes and in pumps here are a few things that can cause premature failure:

    1. Incorrect installation by using the wrong tool
    2. Incorrect placement of the slit
    3. Incorrect installation of pivot/shock hardware

    The only caution to be taken is not to apply to much since the bushing could shift inside the bore but since it's capture by the spacers it will not come out.

    A quote from Garlock Application Guide - Lubrication - Can be used totally dry, fully lubricated, or with intermittent lubrication and can be used in the presence of many industrial liquids.

  17. #17
    "El Whatever"
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker4life
    A quote from Garlock Application Guide - Lubrication - Can be used totally dry, fully lubricated, or with intermittent lubrication and can be used in the presence of many industrial liquids.
    Actually, the same type of bushing is used on our forks and we use lots of oil in them.
    Check my Site

  18. #18
    Amphibious Technologies
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker4life
    During my testing I ran them lubricated and dry. It did not make a difference. I've even removed them and reinstalled them to do more testing.
    No difference; so why not run them dry then?
    "The best you've ridden is the best you know" - Paul Thede, Race Tech

  19. #19
    Nightriding rules SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCUBAPRO
    No difference; so why not run them dry then?
    I do it so I can take the reducers out easily (don't have a bolt extractor ) to change shocks, work on them, etc

    they get kind of stuck when dry...

  20. #20
    The Bubble Wrap Hysteria
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCUBAPRO
    No difference; so why not run them dry then?
    I am currently running them dry due to trail conditions.....dust and sand. Like many parameters in mtn bke set up......test, and document then run what works for your style of riding on the many different trails you ride. Their is no one set answer.....it's all about working within the manufactuers given/stated parameters.

  21. #21
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    I'm waiting for this fine tool to be delivered(Belgium),but what to do with reducers that are very stuck? I just can't get the smallest (Fox shock) out . How do you guy's do this?
    Thx.

  22. #22
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    Arrived yesterday and used right away:works very good,everything went smooth.Took about ten minutes to get the bushing's out and new ones in.

  23. #23
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    Bonking ... not feelin' well X-Post: Review of mtnbiker4life's shock bushing tool

    hi,

    Arrived yesterday and used right away:works very good,everything went smooth.Took about ten minutes to get the bushing's out and new ones in.

    I'm waiting for this fine tool to be delivered(Belgium),but what to do with reducers that are very stuck? I just can't get the smallest (Fox shock) out . How do you guy's do this?
    Thx.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by CliffordHayes
    hi,

    Arrived yesterday and used right away:works very good,everything went smooth.Took about ten minutes to get the bushing's out and new ones in.

    I'm waiting for this fine tool to be delivered(Belgium),but what to do with reducers that are very stuck? I just can't get the smallest (Fox shock) out . How do you guy's do this?
    Thx.
    If the reducers are firmly seated, then the DU bush doesn't need replacing. When the bush is worn they fall out...

  25. #25
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    damn its only 25 bucks? i dont even need one and am tempted to buy it at that price

  26. #26
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    OK I'm going to ditch the socket approach to replacing bushings and get the tool. But I have a question; I have a Fox and typically replace everything: all the spacers/reducers and bushings. It makes things more expensive and takes longer. Plus I tend to avoid the process b/c I don't have all the parts. Should I just be replacing the lower bushing more frequently? Right now I have the "pick up your seat thump."

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slabysz
    OK I'm going to ditch the socket approach to replacing bushings and get the tool. But I have a question; I have a Fox and typically replace everything: all the spacers/reducers and bushings. It makes things more expensive and takes longer. Plus I tend to avoid the process b/c I don't have all the parts. Should I just be replacing the lower bushing more frequently? Right now I have the "pick up your seat thump."
    In my experience, once you have the "pick up your seat thump", the reducers are worn as well. I would like to know the same thing because I usually don't replace the bushing until it's too late.

  28. #28
    The Bubble Wrap Hysteria
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    Quote Originally Posted by ebotto
    In my experience, once you have the "pick up your seat thump", the reducers are worn as well. I would like to know the same thing because I usually don't replace the bushing until it's too late.
    Yes sir, if you wait to long before changing them those spacers/reducers will wear. If the bearing material has worn off the DU Bushing to a point of creating some wobble then spacers/reducers will be allowed to move inside that bushings. THe worst damage will be seen if you have 8mm mounting bolts because the ID of the bolt hole is larger then if you had a 6mm bolt thus reducing the amount of material in the spacer/reducer....essentially making it weaker. How long will it take to bugger everything up....who knows. I'm typically on top of my sh*t so it has never gone that far. But one of my riding buddies rides her bike until it falls apart....usually on the trail which is a buzz kill.

  29. #29
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    Bushing tool

    mtnbiker4life is my hero.

    The last time I needed a DU bushing replaced, I took it to my LBS. They took the shock from me, whipped out their handy flat-head screw driver and hammer and started hacking away. Then they charged me $15. Sure the play was gone, but I swore never to do that again. I usually work on my own bikes, but if I don't have an appropriate tool, I get a little gun shy.

    This bushing tool is amazing. It is so simple and effective, I wish I invented it. I intended to remove the shock and put it in a vise, but the lower mount would not budge. I ended up using a c clamp on the upper bushing while the lower mount was still connected to the bike. The old one came out, and the new one went in with no fuss at all. I put everything back together and the play was gone.

    Thanks mtnbiker4life, I now have one less reason to visit my LBS for maintenance that I can do myself. I think it would be in every do it yourself rider's and every LBS's best interest to own one of your tools.
    Some of us are Hammers, others, just Tools.

  30. #30
    my body breaks the falls
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    I have to echo the praise here. Received mine yesterday (only three days from order date) and in under ten minutes the job was done. I also want to say that the tool is a demonstration of simple elegance. It looks as good as it works. I love it when members of the community fill a niche like this.
    $500 million for more irresponsible EBRPD land management? No thanks.
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  31. #31
    Chilling out
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    +1, good stuff.

    for those that don't have a bench vise, a large c-clamp held in place with a tool box on a table, carefully applied, works just as well.

  32. #32
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    Another happy user

    I got my tool today and had the bike back together again in no time. Well worth the price in reduced aggravation.

    Walt

  33. #33
    More Torque
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    Got and used my a couple of months ago. Excellent stuff!

  34. #34
    Ridin' dirty!
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    2 up for this tool!
    One of the nicest tools I've purchased in a long time...
    "Common sense isn't always that common!"
    Custom Prophet and Custom Delta V

  35. #35
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    Good job!

    Very well made tool. I deal with special tools in the aircraft industry. This is on par.
    Mtnbiker4life excellent to work with, Buy it
    kompressor

  36. #36
    Boyeeee
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    +1

    I used mine recently when building up a buddy's used Nomad. Good tool.

  37. #37
    11 is one louder than 10
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    worth the cash for sure. Just used it, with a hammer - no problems. Great Tool.
    "The thing is, Bob, it's not that I'm lazy, it's that I just don't care."

  38. #38
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    just used it tonight...tool works great...although mine became all stained up after like 3 minutes, haha
    "He can make even a global summit meeting seem like a kegger." M. Dowd, NY Times, 19 July 2006

  39. #39
    56-year-old teenager
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    I just got this tool and wanted to add my compliments to mtnbiker4life. It worked like a champ. I think it's very fairly priced.
    Work is the curse of the biking classes.

  40. #40
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    Action Chuck says: Don't waste your time with sockets and trying to make something work. Took mine to work and replaced my bushing on my coffee break...it's that easy. This tool will have a new bushing in your shock in 10 minutes or less with no damage to anything. I ordered mine on a Saturday, got it in my mailbox on Tuesday. $28 bucks to my door, including the bushings. Worth every penny and then some, thanks!

  41. #41
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    It worked perfectly on my Fox shock too. Great tool. Below is the eBay link:

    http://shop.ebay.com/mtnbiker4life/m...&_trksid=p3686

  42. #42
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    works great
    kompressor

  43. #43
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    Another Thumbs up

    Have had this tool for a year and it works great. Had a few bushing push out easy but a few in so tight that the vice left teeth marks in the back of the tool. Was really glad I was using this tool on that occasion.

    I've also used it to push reducers off shock, sealed bearings all reducers. A lot of other uses for this tool when you get 'stuck'.

  44. #44
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    Another Satisfied Customer

    Ordered on Tuesday. Received it on Thursday. Took ten minutes to replace bushing. No more play! Yay!

  45. #45
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker4life
    ...During my testing I ran them lubricated and dry. It did not make a difference. I've even removed them and reinstalled them to do more testing. In my years of testing these on bikes and in pumps here are a few things that can cause premature failure:

    1. Incorrect installation by using the wrong tool
    2. Incorrect placement of the slit
    3. Incorrect installation of pivot/shock hardware

    The only caution to be taken is not to apply to much since the bushing could shift inside the bore but since it's capture by the spacers it will not come out.

    A quote from Garlock Application Guide - Lubrication - Can be used totally dry, fully lubricated, or with intermittent lubrication and can be used in the presence of many industrial liquids.
    Where should the slit go?
    (Seriously-thx)

    Edit:
    After researching I found the slit shouldnt get placed in the shock path.

  46. #46
    Singletrack Slayer
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    Just got it today and it is so nice, Thank you for the coolest tool ever mtnbiker4life ,

    Thanks
    ~~~~~~Singletrack Slayer~~~~~~~

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slabysz
    OK I'm going to ditch the socket approach to replacing bushings and get the tool. But I have a question; I have a Fox and typically replace everything: all the spacers/reducers and bushings. It makes things more expensive and takes longer. Plus I tend to avoid the process b/c I don't have all the parts. Should I just be replacing the lower bushing more frequently? Right now I have the "pick up your seat thump."
    hey so what's this "pick up your seat thump" ? when i pull up my seat i notice that there is in fact some play on the bottom of my shock --- looks like the part of the shock where the eyelet is can move around a bit on the pivot (not sure if i'm using the correct terms here). do i just need to change the bushings there too or am i kinda screwed at this point and need to do the spaces/reducers ?

    i looked this stuff up to see how to replace the *other* bushing, the one on the top of my fox vanilla shock, which is making clicking noises.

    thanks!
    swine

  48. #48
    Singletrack Slayer
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    Sounds like your bushings are toast, you might need new reducers as well. If it just started and you noticed it you might just need the bushings replaced. I was lucky to catch it right away and the org. reducers are fine.
    ~~~~~~Singletrack Slayer~~~~~~~

  49. #49
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    "I'm not including the steps to remove the shock from the bike and the dogbone as that was already covered on a different thread. "

    could you kindly post a link? i'm at this step and lookin for the info...

    thanks

  50. #50
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    ok so i managed to figure it out with the help of another forum... btw this tool is awesome! thanks mtnbiker4life! another happy customer

    so the pick-up-the-seat thump is now gone, but when i first push the seat down there's a click. does that mean my reducers are toast?

    otherwise it is waaaaay smoother than it was prior to the surgery.

    oh and i just realized i didn't pay attention to where the slit was! does this just mean i should change the bushings again sooner? and i'm not quite sure i understand "Make sure that the slit in the bushing is facing away from the shock body (or facing the back of the bike)." - which one? back of the bike or away from the shock body? cause there's 2 bushings one on each end...

    cheers
    swine

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