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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    X-Post: Review of mtnbiker4life's shock bushing tool


  2. #2
    "El Whatever"
    Reputation: Warp's Avatar
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    Please post it here directly. Maybe AM will do a sticky out of it... it's pure gold!
    Check my Site

  3. #3
    Nightriding rules SuperModerator
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    yeah...awesome work, Flip!

  4. #4
    mtbr member
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    The unabridged version....

    If you slightly lift up the saddle of 575 and hear a knocking or looseness kinda noise, make sure all the suspension bolts are tight, your rear wheel's bearings are not loose and your saddle is tight on the seatpost. If the sound and sensation is still there, it's more than likely your shock's bushings.
    Here is what it would sound like (turn up the volume):


    I'm not including the steps to remove the shock from the bike and the dogbone as that was already covered on a different thread.

    Step 1- Gather all the tools you will need. In this case, a bushing tool. This tool is made by mtbr member "mtnbiker4life" and he sells it in the classifieds along with bushings for different manufacturers. It is very well made and I highly recommended it to the DIY crowd! Also shown are the assorted tools needed to remove the shock from the Yeti and it's dogbone linkage.



    Here is a picture of the old bushing prior to removal.


    Step 2- Insert the Ejector Pin through the bushing and slide the bushing guide on the other side with the counter bore facing the shock so as to capture the bushing once it's pressed out by the pin.



    I used a vise to press the bushing out out of the shock eyelet and into the counter bore.


    The bushing presses out pretty easily using the vise.


    Note that the bushing has been pressed out of the shock's eyelet and into the counterbore on the other side.


    Step 3- Installing a new bushing
    Clean the eyelet.


    Lightly grease the pin


    Put the new bushing on the pin


    Lightly grease the bushing


    Place the support foot (the end cap) into the counter bore of the bushing guide (the counter bore will not be directly against the shock during the bushing installation).


    Make sure that the slit in the bushing is facing away from the shock body (or facing the back of the bike).


    Put the tool into the vise and slowly press the new bushing in.


    Halfway in


    Done



    Step 4- Put the shock back on the bike and torque all bolts to spec.

    Test. No more bushing slop


    Total time was 10 minutes to remove the shock and dog bone, 5 minutes to remove and install a new bushing and another 10 minutes to reinstall the dog bone and put the shock back on the bike....

  5. #5
    The Bubble Wrap Hysteria
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    This is a great illustration on this tools use. The 12mm bushing tool is now available as seen side-by-side with the 1/2 inch bushing tool.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #6
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    +1! Another VERY happy user of this tool.

  7. #7
    May contain nuts
    Reputation: Haggis's Avatar
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    Got the new black 12mm tool for Manitou shocks. A thing of beauty and a joy forever. Stop messing with sockets and get one.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haggis
    Got the new black 12mm tool for Manitou shocks. A thing of beauty and a joy forever. Stop messing with sockets and get one.
    Well I did order the 1/2" version, should be here any day, I will comment back once mine comes in as I need to change out the DU's on my Roco.

    Just picked up an Manitou Evolver ISX-6, so I guess I will need the 12mm DU tool for that now or at least down the road when the DU's wear.

    Cheers
    J

  9. #9
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    I finally used the bushing tool that I bought from mtnbiker4life some time back.

    A few minutes and I was done. Thank you for making a quality tool that works this well.

  10. #10
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    Yep, works great. Just the tool for the job.
    Quote Originally Posted by buddhak
    And I thought I had a bike obsession. You are at once tragic and awesome.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
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    Agreed, great tool. I picked one up a while back but haven't needed to use it yet.

  12. #12
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    I bought one last week and used it yesterday. It is an awesome tool, very well made and extremely easy to use. Only took about 10-15 minutes to swap out the bushings. The play that was once there is now gone.

  13. #13
    moaaar shimz
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    Yeah I used it too and it took like 3-4 minutes. Great tool.

  14. #14
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    why are you using grease on the bushing?
    That isn't a good idea according to the folks at Romic and my LBS....

  15. #15
    Amphibious Technologies
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qman
    why are you using grease on the bushing?
    That isn't a good idea according to the folks at Romic and my LBS....

    Agreed. I did that once and dirt got in the bushing and actually decreased life of bushing. Never again. I run them dry and they last much longer.
    "The best you've ridden is the best you know" - Paul Thede, Race Tech

  16. #16
    The Bubble Wrap Hysteria
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCUBAPRO
    Agreed. I did that once and dirt got in the bushing and actually decreased life of bushing. Never again. I run them dry and they last much longer.
    The manufacture of the bushings states these can be run dry or lubricated since the ones I sell have a small percentage of lead which increases lubricity. As stated our application is exposed to the elements so adding anything that will make dirt/sand stick to it would not be good.

    During my testing I ran them lubricated and dry. It did not make a difference. I've even removed them and reinstalled them to do more testing. In my years of testing these on bikes and in pumps here are a few things that can cause premature failure:

    1. Incorrect installation by using the wrong tool
    2. Incorrect placement of the slit
    3. Incorrect installation of pivot/shock hardware

    The only caution to be taken is not to apply to much since the bushing could shift inside the bore but since it's capture by the spacers it will not come out.

    A quote from Garlock Application Guide - Lubrication - Can be used totally dry, fully lubricated, or with intermittent lubrication and can be used in the presence of many industrial liquids.

  17. #17
    "El Whatever"
    Reputation: Warp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker4life
    A quote from Garlock Application Guide - Lubrication - Can be used totally dry, fully lubricated, or with intermittent lubrication and can be used in the presence of many industrial liquids.
    Actually, the same type of bushing is used on our forks and we use lots of oil in them.
    Check my Site

  18. #18
    Amphibious Technologies
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker4life
    During my testing I ran them lubricated and dry. It did not make a difference. I've even removed them and reinstalled them to do more testing.
    No difference; so why not run them dry then?
    "The best you've ridden is the best you know" - Paul Thede, Race Tech

  19. #19
    Nightriding rules SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCUBAPRO
    No difference; so why not run them dry then?
    I do it so I can take the reducers out easily (don't have a bolt extractor ) to change shocks, work on them, etc

    they get kind of stuck when dry...

  20. #20
    The Bubble Wrap Hysteria
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCUBAPRO
    No difference; so why not run them dry then?
    I am currently running them dry due to trail conditions.....dust and sand. Like many parameters in mtn bke set up......test, and document then run what works for your style of riding on the many different trails you ride. Their is no one set answer.....it's all about working within the manufactuers given/stated parameters.

  21. #21
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    I'm waiting for this fine tool to be delivered(Belgium),but what to do with reducers that are very stuck? I just can't get the smallest (Fox shock) out . How do you guy's do this?
    Thx.

  22. #22
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    Arrived yesterday and used right away:works very good,everything went smooth.Took about ten minutes to get the bushing's out and new ones in.

  23. #23
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    Bonking ... not feelin' well X-Post: Review of mtnbiker4life's shock bushing tool

    hi,

    Arrived yesterday and used right away:works very good,everything went smooth.Took about ten minutes to get the bushing's out and new ones in.

    I'm waiting for this fine tool to be delivered(Belgium),but what to do with reducers that are very stuck? I just can't get the smallest (Fox shock) out . How do you guy's do this?
    Thx.

  24. #24
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    Reputation: Haggis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CliffordHayes
    hi,

    Arrived yesterday and used right away:works very good,everything went smooth.Took about ten minutes to get the bushing's out and new ones in.

    I'm waiting for this fine tool to be delivered(Belgium),but what to do with reducers that are very stuck? I just can't get the smallest (Fox shock) out . How do you guy's do this?
    Thx.
    If the reducers are firmly seated, then the DU bush doesn't need replacing. When the bush is worn they fall out...

  25. #25
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    damn its only 25 bucks? i dont even need one and am tempted to buy it at that price

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