Results 1 to 40 of 40
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    186

    whats all the hype with triple crown forks?

    i've noticed triple crown forks have been becoming increasingly popular the past few months. so whats the big deal about them?

  2. #2
    Gravity Tester
    Reputation: Dangeruss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    549
    Popular amongst aggressive trail riders / free riders / and downhillers. With a double crown fork, you can have longer travel without trying to manage all the twisting and bending forces with a single crown. This yields a stronger, less twist prone, beefier front end which is often desireable in those types of riding.

    XC riders shun them due to weight, but I'd bet if you could deliver a dual crown fork under 4.5 lbs they might be interested for similar handling improvement reasons.

  3. #3
    Your bike is incorrigible
    Reputation: Guyechka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    3,139
    Quote Originally Posted by Dangeruss
    Popular amongst aggressive trail riders / free riders / and downhillers. With a double crown fork, you can have longer travel without trying to manage all the twisting and bending forces with a single crown. This yields a stronger, less twist prone, beefier front end which is often desireable in those types of riding.

    XC riders shun them due to weight, but I'd bet if you could deliver a dual crown fork under 4.5 lbs they might be interested for similar handling improvement reasons.
    Maverick DUC -- dual crown, 6" travel, a little under 4 pounds. They are popular out here for XC, trail riding.

  4. #4
    banned
    Reputation: 29Colossus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    4,150
    Quote Originally Posted by smalbikpro
    i've noticed triple crown forks have been becoming increasingly popular the past few months. so whats the big deal about them?
    Stiff and deep.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: itsdoable's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,898
    Quote Originally Posted by smalbikpro
    whats all the hype with triple crown forks?
    What's a triple crown fork? Where does the 3rd crown go....

  6. #6
    www.derbyrims.com
    Reputation: derby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,787

    Triple clamp/duel crown

    Quote Originally Posted by itsdoable
    What's a triple crown fork? Where does the 3rd crown go....
    The real term is triple clamp (including the axle clamp), with duel crowns above and below the head tube.

    Stiffer than single crown.


  7. #7
    Don't skid
    Reputation: KONA_in_SB's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    1,158
    Actually I think that overall dual crown are decreasing in popularity (except in DH racing and extreme freeriding conditions) do to the increased number of long travel (6+ inches) single crown forks. And dual crown forks have been poplular for a lot longer than the last few months.
    The Revolution will not be motorized...especially at $5 per gallon.

  8. #8
    Whatever
    Reputation: MINImtnbiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    555
    Specialized has their 2007 Enduro coming with their new in-house developed triple clamp fork, that supposedly is around 4lbs. I have a Maverick and can tell you it is WAY stiffer than a single crown. And it is 3.9lbs. You can blast through a rock garden and the front wheel still goes where you want it to...no deflection.

  9. #9
    Who are the brain police?
    Reputation: Locoman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,099
    Come on now, my Zoke 66 can hang with the dubs and trips.
    The Who - Glittering Girl
    Ween - The Grobe
    Yellowman - Strong Me Strong
    all your base are belong to us

  10. #10
    Yummy
    Reputation: K'Endo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,264
    Quote Originally Posted by MINImtnbiker
    Specialized has their 2007 Enduro coming with their new in-house developed triple clamp fork, that supposedly is around 4lbs. I have a Maverick and can tell you it is WAY stiffer than a single crown. And it is 3.9lbs. You can blast through a rock garden and the front wheel still goes where you want it to...no deflection.
    Specialized developed a fork? Hardly ...

    stratos sued and out of business...

    Kn.
    I used to be with it. Then, they changed what "it" is, and now what I'm with is no longer "it". And whatever "it" is, is strange and confusing.

  11. #11
    Whatever
    Reputation: MINImtnbiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    555
    Interesting...Specialized still is bringing to market a lightweight triple crown, whether or not they developed it.

    Regarding the Zoke 66...sure, but that is a 6 1/2 pound freeride fork. The Maverick DUC32 is under 4 pounds. The Specialized is supposedly 4 1/2 pounds. Supposedly -- and this may be marketing BS -- triples are not as stressful to frames because for the same travel fork, the triple spreads loads on the top and bottom of the head tube. Someone with an actual engineering background should be able to call BS on that claim if that is not true.

    Point is, "hype" or not, folks are starting to use triple crowns for more than DH/freeride. I think that was the original question.

  12. #12
    Goathead Gladiator
    Reputation: bwolmarans's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    280
    the nice thing about a single crown freeride fork is you get all the weight without the stiffness :-)

  13. #13
    Just another FOC'er
    Reputation: .Danno.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    2,222
    Quote Originally Posted by MINImtnbiker
    Interesting...Specialized still is bringing to market a lightweight triple crown, whether or not they developed it.

    Regarding the Zoke 66...sure, but that is a 6 1/2 pound freeride fork. The Maverick DUC32 is under 4 pounds. The Specialized is supposedly 4 1/2 pounds. Supposedly -- and this may be marketing BS -- triples are not as stressful to frames because for the same travel fork, the triple spreads loads on the top and bottom of the head tube. Someone with an actual engineering background should be able to call BS on that claim if that is not true.

    Point is, "hype" or not, folks are starting to use triple crowns for more than DH/freeride. I think that was the original question.
    Actually, because they're stiffer the peak shear force to the headtube is higher than an SC fork. That's why a lot of frame manufactures say no DC forks.

    Ultimately, if an SC was equally stiff the top and bottom headset races would see the same forces as a DC fork. I think some are getting close.

  14. #14
    Me hates pinchflat
    Reputation: 545cu4ch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    2,415
    Quote Originally Posted by bwolmarans
    the nice thing about a single crown freeride fork is you get all the weight without the stiffness :-)
    Nahh. Single crowns are usually lighter. Plus, they are more versatile for tricks and have a longer turning radius.
    I personally think that long travel SC look pimp
    Quote Originally Posted by sriracha
    "jesus would huck it"
    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    i have found the 1.5" headtubes to be slightly larger in diameter than 1 1/8", plus or minus

  15. #15
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,307
    Quote Originally Posted by K'Endo
    Specialized developed a fork? Hardly ...

    stratos sued and out of business...

    Kn.
    That has little to nothing to do with Spec. designing their own fork. I do not like what they have done to Stratos (and others) but it is mostly OT here.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: xKREDx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    2,263
    I think that its almost the other way around you see more single crown forks then you do dual crown or triple clamp's like for example look at the 07 glory in my opinion its one of the best DH bikes out there and its got a 07 66 which is a single crown fork also now lots of newer single crown fork's are starting to have as much travel as some dual crown fork's do.
    Quote Originally Posted by shredder111
    Can I paint your rockring, silly bun salad?

  17. #17
    Use this space for what?
    Reputation: Cozza's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    219
    Quote Originally Posted by derby
    The real term is triple clamp (including the axle clamp), with duel crowns above and below the head tube.

    Stiffer than single crown.

    Actually, the crowns themselves are called triple clamps, because they clamp 3 things, the 2 fork tubes and the steerer.
    '08 Cannondale SystemSIX 4
    '07 Bianchi MUSS - with trick bits
    '04 Kona Stinky - Sold!
    '86 Miele

  18. #18
    Yummy
    Reputation: K'Endo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,264
    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    That has little to nothing to do with Spec. designing their own fork. I do not like what they have done to Stratos (and others) but it is mostly OT here.
    Well actually, Spec's use of loopholes in patent laws to steal designs, bully competitors out of business and then call the designs their own has a lot to do with whether or not they've designed their own fork.

    Whether or not it is on or off topic, I find their behaviour so objectionable that it's worth taking every opportunity to expose it whenever and wherever possible. Specialized has shown a trend toward using lawyers and threatened lawsuits to get rid of smaller competitors and we should all be absolutely enraged by such conduct.

    Kn.
    I used to be with it. Then, they changed what "it" is, and now what I'm with is no longer "it". And whatever "it" is, is strange and confusing.

  19. #19
    Me hates pinchflat
    Reputation: 545cu4ch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    2,415
    Quote Originally Posted by xKREDx
    I think that its almost the other way around you see more single crown forks then you do dual crown or triple clamp's like for example look at the 07 glory in my opinion its one of the best DH bikes out there and its got a 07 66 which is a single crown fork also now lots of newer single crown fork's are starting to have as much travel as some dual crown fork's do.
    The glory that comes with the 66 is the Glory 8 model for freeride. The Glory DH comes with a double crown fox 40
    Quote Originally Posted by sriracha
    "jesus would huck it"
    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    i have found the 1.5" headtubes to be slightly larger in diameter than 1 1/8", plus or minus

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: xKREDx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    2,263
    Quote Originally Posted by 545cu4ch
    The glory that comes with the 66 is the Glory 8 model for freeride. The Glory DH comes with a double crown fox 40
    Oh I thought that the glory with the 66 was the DH verson. I never knew that giant made a glory for freeride thats cool.
    Quote Originally Posted by shredder111
    Can I paint your rockring, silly bun salad?

  21. #21
    MTK
    MTK is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    309

    K'Endo,

    Well actually, Spec's use of loopholes in patent laws to steal designs, bully competitors out of business and then call the designs their own has a lot to do with whether or not they've designed their own fork.

    Whether or not it is on or off topic, I find their behaviour so objectionable that it's worth taking every opportunity to expose it whenever and wherever possible. Specialized has shown a trend toward using lawyers and threatened lawsuits to get rid of smaller competitors and we should all be absolutely enraged by such conduct.

    I am enraged by such conduct,and thanks for the link. Good read,and let us not
    forget Mnt.Cycle. I still cant beleive that story. They make such a fine bike
    as well. I would love to Crush his empire,if only I had the money.

    MTK{ I thought Shimano was the Evil Empire?}

  22. #22
    banned
    Reputation: Pete's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    2,227
    Quote Originally Posted by MINImtnbiker
    I have a Maverick and can tell you it is WAY stiffer than a single crown. And it is 3.9lbs. You can blast through a rock garden and the front wheel still goes where you want it to...no deflection.
    That is such a load of crap that your post looks brown on my monitor.

    (DUC32 owner who is currently riding a single crown that is stiffer, deflects much less AND doesn't have incredibly primitive dampning that relegates the DUC32 to "also ran" status.)

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    1,603
    be wary that turning radius will decrease...you can find 170 mm single crowns
    "He can make even a global summit meeting seem like a kegger." M. Dowd, NY Times, 19 July 2006

  24. #24
    just along for the ride
    Reputation: Brown_Teeth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,035
    Indeed turning radius is the problem with 3 clampers, almost impossible at time to clear switchbacks on the steep climbs.

  25. #25
    Just another FOC'er
    Reputation: .Danno.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    2,222
    Quote Originally Posted by Brown_Teeth
    Indeed turning radius is the problem with 3 clampers, almost impossible at time to clear switchbacks on the steep climbs.
    Both of mine allow at least 70 degrees, maybe more. I think most people run too thick bumper stops.

    I never bang my knees either

    The biggest drawbacks on the triples for me are that I can't switch forks around quite as easily, and no X-ups. Not that I'm losing a lot on that 2nd issue considering my half a$$ed style

  26. #26
    Whatever
    Reputation: MINImtnbiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    555

    Compared to what?

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete
    That is such a load of crap that your post looks brown on my monitor.

    (DUC32 owner who is currently riding a single crown that is stiffer, deflects much less AND doesn't have incredibly primitive dampning that relegates the DUC32 to "also ran" status.)
    OK, maybe I should've prefaced my comment with "compared to SC forks of similar weight and design intentions." ... Yes, it does not compare to a Fox36 which is 2 pounds heavier. And as far as damping, I'm not going to argue that. Damping is totally personal preference. Some hucksters like a real slow rebound. And some like me, prefer very fast rebound.

  27. #27
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    24,637
    Quote Originally Posted by .Danno.
    Both of mine allow at least 70 degrees, maybe more. I think most people run too thick bumper stops.

    I never bang my knees either

    The biggest drawbacks on the triples for me are that I can't switch forks around quite as easily, and no X-ups. Not that I'm losing a lot on that 2nd issue considering my half a$$ed style
    I didn't think I'd ever see it much, but these days I DO turn my fork 90 degrees on some uphill switchbacks. It's a 170mm 66, and the ability to turn it that far means the difference for many of these switchbacks, especially when there's about 30 of them on a 2500' ascent.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  28. #28
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    24,637
    Quote Originally Posted by MINImtnbiker
    OK, maybe I should've prefaced my comment with "compared to SC forks of similar weight and design intentions." ... Yes, it does not compare to a Fox36 which is 2 pounds heavier. And as far as damping, I'm not going to argue that. Damping is totally personal preference. Some hucksters like a real slow rebound. And some like me, prefer very fast rebound.
    Unfortunatly, maverick would like to keep discussions and descriptions vague, because it is true that it will deflect less fore and aft (if that is a big problem for you), but it will also deflect MORE in torsion, or "twisting". This in undeniable due to the nature of an inverted fork design, made even worse when you remove the second crown. The brake arch on a conventional fork does a lot to keep the fork twisting, and it is also near where the sliders meet the stanchions, which helps even more. An inverted fork has nothing in this area to help prevent torsional flexing.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  29. #29
    Whatever
    Reputation: MINImtnbiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    555
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    I didn't think I'd ever see it much, but these days I DO turn my fork 90 degrees on some uphill switchbacks. It's a 170mm 66, and the ability to turn it that far means the difference for many of these switchbacks, especially when there's about 30 of them on a 2500' ascent.
    90 degrees is pretty tough while putting down any kind of power...without plowing the front wheel sideways. You must be pretty good! 85 degrees or so is perfectly rideable going up. I have made more switchbacks on my DUC32 than on my old singlecrowns (SID, SID SL, Mars, etc) which were all wimpy XC forks. Maybe it is because it's a stiffer fork than my old ones, and holds a line, and also maybe I've become a better rider in 3 years on the DUC Also a lot has to do with frame geometry...wheelbase, head angle, etc. On a bike with a long wheelbase and slack head angle, it is much more difficult to climb steep switchbacks.

  30. #30
    Whatever
    Reputation: MINImtnbiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    555
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Unfortunatly, maverick would like to keep discussions and descriptions vague, because it is true that it will deflect less fore and aft (if that is a big problem for you), but it will also deflect MORE in torsion, or "twisting". This in undeniable due to the nature of an inverted fork design, made even worse when you remove the second crown. The brake arch on a conventional fork does a lot to keep the fork twisting, and it is also near where the sliders meet the stanchions, which helps even more. An inverted fork has nothing in this area to help prevent torsional flexing.
    Oh, that must be why all of Honda's top motocross and road racing bikes use inverted forks. And many many more.

    Jayem, just what is your personal beef with Maverick? If you don't like them, then don't buy one.

  31. #31
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    24,637
    Quote Originally Posted by MINImtnbiker
    Oh, that must be why all of Honda's top motocross and road racing bikes use inverted forks. And many many more.

    Jayem, just what is your personal beef with Maverick? If you don't like them, then don't buy one.
    Because it's not possible to get the amount of travel that those motorcross forks have and still retain a decent amount of bushing overlap. The only viable option is of course the inverted design.

    The road racing bikes that use inverted forks only have a few inches of travel, and the amount of overlap as compared to travel is pretty large. That means that a marzocchi shiver with only 2" of travel would be one hell of a stiff fork, but when compared to other 7-8" right-side up forks, it's a good deal flexier.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  32. #32
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    24,637
    Quote Originally Posted by MINImtnbiker
    90 degrees is pretty tough while putting down any kind of power...without plowing the front wheel sideways. You must be pretty good! 85 degrees or so is perfectly rideable going up. I have made more switchbacks on my DUC32 than on my old singlecrowns (SID, SID SL, Mars, etc) which were all wimpy XC forks. Maybe it is because it's a stiffer fork than my old ones, and holds a line, and also maybe I've become a better rider in 3 years on the DUC Also a lot has to do with frame geometry...wheelbase, head angle, etc. On a bike with a long wheelbase and slack head angle, it is much more difficult to climb steep switchbacks.
    Well, I can't tell you why you make more switchbacks on the duc, but the SID and mars are/were jokes as far as I'm concerned. I worked in a shop long enough and had enough expereicnes with those forks to know just what kind of trash they were. Is a DUC32 better than a SID? Maybe, but that ain't saying a lot considering how flexy and crappy a SID is in terms of damping and chassi.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  33. #33
    Whatever
    Reputation: MINImtnbiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    555
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Well, I can't tell you why you make more switchbacks on the duc, but the SID and mars are/were jokes as far as I'm concerned. I worked in a shop long enough and had enough expereicnes with those forks to know just what kind of trash they were. Is a DUC32 better than a SID? Maybe, but that ain't saying a lot considering how flexy and crappy a SID is in terms of damping and chassi.
    I wasn't comparing those forks. My point was that my triple crown doesn't hinder me on switchbacks. But the other reference forks I've ridden are, yes, crappy.

    Re: the motocross forks, they have 12" of travel. Two inches more than today's high-end DH forks. I'm not going to argue with you anymore; I still don't understand your deal with Maverick. For what it is, a lightweight long-travel stiff XC/all mtn fork, it is great. For a full-on freeride fork, yep, I might look somewhere else as there are tons of other options. But for XC forks most of them are spindly, not much lighter, and much less travel.

  34. #34
    MTK
    MTK is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    309

    Back to the topic.

    Forgive me,I need to stay on the thread. I have a Mazi 1998 Z1 Dual
    {single crown 20mm},and a 1998 Mr.T Double Crown{20mm}. Both are
    4 inch travel and are used on my Hardtail. For me,I Can Not chase my
    Buddy on my Single Crown balls out, in the Rough while he is on his Squishy.
    Period,end of Topic. If I have my Double Crown,I will try my best and sometimes
    win. The difference is amazing. Also,20mm is so much Stiffer. That
    has not been talked about to much on this thread. Anyways,there is no
    perfect setup. So I just switch um when I feel like it. I will say that I favor
    the Single Crown for overall perfection,if that's possible. I Like the turning
    radius. Both are Tanks and I have never put them on a Scale. I do have a
    new scale though,perhaps I will? Mabye not.

    MTK

  35. #35
    banned
    Reputation: Pete's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    2,227
    Quote Originally Posted by MINImtnbiker
    Compared to what?
    A Pike air. The same "class" and the same target audience, even though it has less total travel...

    The Pike blows away the DUC32 in stiffness, plushness, damping, the ability to maintain travel at reduced levels of travels, a true lockout, etc. There is no comparison.


    Quote Originally Posted by MINImtnbiker
    Damping is totally personal preference.
    Agreed. The only problem is that the DUC32 has practically zero damping. Hence, it packs very badly under breaking and on repeated hard hits.

  36. #36
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    24,637
    Quote Originally Posted by MINImtnbiker

    Re: the motocross forks, they have 12" of travel. Two inches more than today's high-end DH forks.
    Please tell me which high end DH forks have 10" of travel.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by 29Colossus
    Stiff and deep.
    'nuff said.

  38. #38
    ~Disc~Golf~
    Reputation: highdelll's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    16,491
    Quote Originally Posted by MightyBison93
    'nuff said.
    great 2nd post and dead-thread resurrection.
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  39. #39
    meow meow
    Reputation: b-kul's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    10,622
    Quote Originally Posted by MightyBison93
    'nuff said.
    ummmmm, you bumped a four year old thread to say that?

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    4,687
    Yeah! I would have said "That's what she said" Or "My wife likes it that way" or............

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •