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  1. #1
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    We the people ... RockShox Revelation Race Dual Air

    Hi: This may be somewhat of a newbie question but I need some help. I have a 2010 Rock Shox Revelation Race Dual Air in my Ibis Mojo. It features the 20mm Maxle Lite, I've been thinking about changing it for a Float RLC FIT with a 15QR axle, but what I'm not sure is if the 20mm Maxle Lite is the equivalent to Fox's 20 QR axle, or if the 15QR featured on the float I'm looking at will fit.
    I appreciate the help, thank you.

  2. #2
    aka dan51
    Reputation: d-bug's Avatar
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    Personally I would stick with the Revelation. That's one of the best forks I've ever owned.

    If you want to go to the Fox 15QR, then you will need to make sure your hub can be converted to the 15mm standard.
    The Fox/RS stuff is not interchangeable. The 20 or 15 simply refers to the diameter of the thru axle in mm.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    ...People thought they were getting a good fork because it was a "fox".

  3. #3
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    Personally I would stick with the Revelation. That's one of the best forks I've ever owned.
    Maybe I haven't been able to properly dial the settings because I miss my old Float R, it was plusher.

    The 20 or 15 simply refers to the diameter of the thru axle in mm.
    So, supposing I buy a FLOAT 36 with a 20QR I'd still have to do come conversion to the hub?.
    Thank you.

  4. #4
    aka dan51
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    Quote Originally Posted by defuentes View Post
    Maybe I haven't been able to properly dial the settings because I miss my old Float R, it was plusher.


    So, supposing I buy a FLOAT 36 with a 20QR I'd still have to do come conversion to the hub?.
    Thank you.
    Work on the Rev settings; there are plenty of threads on it regarding settings. The first setting is not to use the RS recommended settings. They are too firm.
    It's the plushest air fork I've ever used. I wish RS made a dual air Lyrik.

    You would only need to modify the hub if you were going with a different thru axle diameter, like going from 20 to 15. Getting a float 36 will not require changing the hub.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    ...People thought they were getting a good fork because it was a "fox".

  5. #5
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    I'll play with the settings, and you're right, the ones recommended by RS are very firm.

    You would only need to modify the hub if you were going with a different thru axle diameter, like going from 20 to 15. Getting a float 36 will not require changing the hub.
    That's what I thought, thanks.

  6. #6
    The Bubble Wrap Hysteria
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    Here is a post by a mtbr member regarding the Motion Control Damper.......I wish I knew the thread so I could give credit to the member.


    The end-all explanation to Motion Control Damping...
    ________________________________________
    Ever wonder what the heck is with Motion Control? Why so many people like it? Why so many people don't like it (lack of setup)? Why is it just about the most versatile system you can use?

    Here's a breakdown of how motion control works:

    You have a plastic spring tube that compresses from the oil pressure. It can compress up to around a quarter inch.

    At the bottom of the spring tube is a hole. This is the compression hole. The compression knob turns a rod that adjusts how much of the hole is showing.

    The bottom of the plastic spring tube is sealed off from the inside of the tube to force oil through the compression hole. Locking the compression closes this hole.

    The bottom of the spring tube is a sleeve that covers the compression hole. As oil pressure rises the spring tube gets pushed back. The floodgate setting is nothing more than a metal rod that screws in and out and adjusts the distance from it and the bottom of the spring tube where the compression hole is. Under full open loose floodgate, the rod is all the way down and nearly touching the compression damper.

    When the compression is locked out, it will not open again until it has been pushed upwards by the oil pressure and is touching the floodgate rod. The floodgate rod opens the compression hole upon contact and opens it more and more depending on how high the oil pressure is.

    Backing the floodgate all the way up to full firm will cause the compression unit to travel a longer distance before being opened and letting oil through and leveling the oil pressure. The spring tube is something like 5000 lbs/in so moving it becomes very hard the longer it has to move before opening. This is why the fork can literally become totally locked out with full FG. It's because the spring tube needs to compress more than the rider's weight can fulfill before opening the compression hole.

    Quite frankly, it's the most effective and simple system you can make. The floodgate setting is pretty much like having an adjustable shim stack without having to change shims.


    Floodgate also works as a high speed valving:

    It requires over twice as much fork speed and pressure to get the compression unit to compress when it isn't fully closed. This is because the oil is allowed to flow through and doesn't create enough pressure and normal speeds to compress the spring tube enough to bring the compression unit in contact with the floodgate rod. Thus you must loosen the floodgate which lowers the floodgate rod closer to the compression unit. That way the floodgate rod is doing something on faster hits and is helping to level off oil pressures.

    In full open compression mode, the floodgate is useless no matter what setting it is in. There is just too much oil being let through the compression hole to generate enough pressure to push the spring tube back enough.

    You must close the compression hole half or all the way in order to effectively use floodgate as a high speed valving.

    Ideally you want to have the compression hole set fairly tight in order to control fork movement on slow speeds. Stuff like pedal bobbing and fork dive are slow speed events. You want to close the compression so as to limit the fork's ability to move at slow speeds. You then want to loosen the floodgate so that the rod is all the way down to the compression damper. That way ANY movement faster than pedal bobbing or fork dive will cause the compression unit to hit the floodgate rod and open the compression hole, thus letting oil through and letting the fork move like normal.

    The reason myself and Kapusta like that setting is because it provides the most consistent damping, very linear in respect to oil blow off.

    Running the compression halfway open and closing floodgate all the way tight so the rod is way up will result in a super progressive damping, which is not what you want for most riding. It won't control ANY low speed movements and use too much travel at higher speeds. Running full floodgate with open compression is asking for a horrible ride no different than an SSV fork.

    Running full locked compression and using a light floodgate is the best you can get to a platform feel, but with better bump ability and consistent damping through the whole stroke. This setting doesn't degrade bump smoothness much and makes the fork ride higher and more controlled. IMO this system is incredibly more useful and versatile than any SPV fork. I can't stand riding any SPV fork after having Motion Control.

    On the other hand though leaving compression full open is nice for maximizing wet traction, when traction is more important than eliminating fork dive or pedal bob.


    Well, there's the short explanation of it all...


    edit: one great thing about the Motion control damping system is that it provides a seamless movement when pushing open the compression hole with the floodgate rod. Instead of a system that has an on/off switch where it goes from locked to loose in 2 mm of fork compression, motion control has a bit of give before hitting the floodgate rod and letting oil through.

    The spring damper tube can compress roughly a quarter inch. Due to the fluid dynamics of the oil push rod, it takes more fork movement than 1mm to get the oil level to move up 1mm, thus there is a leverage ratio acting on the spring tube. This allows the fork to still compress even when the compression hole is still locked and hasn't hit the floodgate rod yet. Try locking compression and then running floodgate full tight, you will notice this compression in the spring tube adds up to around 20mm.

    That all provides for one hell of a seamless system.


    .

  7. #7
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    Thank you mtnbiker4life. Very useful; does anyone have a link to a manual for the fork?; I want to learn exactly which knobs control what and be able to set it properly. I'm used to only have rebound speed and single air pressure.

  8. #8
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    The first setting is not to use the RS recommended settings. They are too firm.
    Hi Dan; I think we have the same bike and weight about the same with gear; you also have the revelation right? What settings do you use?; So that I have a good starting point for configuring mine.
    Thanks.

  9. #9
    aka dan51
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    Quote Originally Posted by defuentes View Post
    Hi Dan; I think we have the same bike and weight about the same with gear; you also have the revelation right? What settings do you use?; So that I have a good starting point for configuring mine.
    Thanks.
    Have a look through this thread for some good starting points. I put my info in it as well.
    2010 150mm Rockshox Revelation Settings Thread
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    ...People thought they were getting a good fork because it was a "fox".

  10. #10
    Huffy Rider
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    I had that same fork on my previous reign and it was awesome, very plush, just fiddle with your settings. Going to a Fox is a step backwards. I have a 2011 RLT Ti and liked the 2010 Race a little better. And yes, the RS air settings are a little too harsh.

    Brenda

  11. #11
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    Hi Brenda and all; you were right!; I FINALLY got my settings right and it feels great, very plush. Had to go way below what RS suggest and opened the floodgate almost completely but I finally understand what every setting does!. THANKS!.

  12. #12
    aka dan51
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    Cool, glad you got it dialed in.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    ...People thought they were getting a good fork because it was a "fox".

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