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  1. #1
    HOO KOO KRAZY
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    ROCK SHOX Indy XC (expectations)?

    The 1999 Gary Fisher Hoo Koo E Koo I picked up this week has this shock on it. From what I've read, even though this is older it is unusually reliable. Since it appears to be the least serviced item on this bike, what should I expect from it?

    What is newer but compatible? What can anyone tell me about front suspension in general. In my newbie announcement I noted that my GOOD Diamondback I bought ten years ago was promptly stolen, so I've not yet had much experience with front suspension.

    Any input is welcome. Thanks.
    get busy LIVIN or get busy DYIN!

  2. #2
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    As an older elastomer ("rubber bumper") shock, I'd not expect it to work well at all.

    New elastomers work ok for a while, until they split, or get sacked out. But one that's 7 years old without any work done?

    Personally, I'd ditch it and look for an 85mm Marzocchi MX. It will be quite a bit heavier, but the improved ride will be so worth it.

  3. #3
    HOO KOO KRAZY
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    Good job!

    OK that's a great bit of information. I didn't even know what this shock consisted of, really have no idea what is of equal (or better) quality now.

    I should say that the bike is overall in great shape. The shock only has one of the decals partially torn off, not dents, paint dings or apparent damage. The rest of the bike seems to have been well maintained with a few upgrades.

    Any information about how (what to get) I might keep this bike in great running order is what I am looking for. Nothing too fancy, but just the basics. Hard when you've been "out of the know" for ten years!
    get busy LIVIN or get busy DYIN!

  4. #4
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    something comparable.... OMNI shocks, suntour shocks, etc all those are about just as bad as the indy XC.

    thing is many times you can get a decent shock for cheap at a shop just because its been taken off a bike, like for instance i saw a rockshox pilot shock for under 100bucks brand new thats CAD it would be a bit better then what you have and more travel

  5. #5
    56-year-old teenager
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    As the owner of a late-'90s Big Sur that came with the same fork, I'd say any short-travel shock with hydraulic damping would be an improvement! I got a same-vintage Manitou FS to replace mine. The FS is nothing spectacular, but it's dramatically better than the Indy.

    Check the closeout sales for year-old models, and the take-offs at the LBS and eBay.

  6. #6
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    I posted the same question "Fork Upgrades". 50 people read the thread and no one chose to comment. I have the same POS Indy C forks on an older Diamondback. They have zero dampening on comp or rebound, just springs. I too am looking for something a little lighter w/dampening on comp/rebound. Adjustability would be a little more than I need. At least you got some responses.

    Rick

  7. #7
    People of zee wurl,Relax!
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    I still use it

    I have the same fork on my Gary Fisher Big Sur coverted to singlespeed. I upgraded a lot of parts on the bike but never messed with the fork. It's not the greatest but I have taken it to Slickrock and Porcupine Rim in Moab and it did fine. If you do upgrade you could get something like the Marz MX. I suggest saving up your money for a new bike rather than trying to upgrade the HKEK too much..
    Less Talk, More Rock.
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  8. #8
    HOO KOO KRAZY
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    Hope t-h-a-n-k-s

    Thanks for these responses.

    From what I understand, the XC is slightly better than the C in that the XC has both a spring and elastomer, no? That being said, both are OLD technology (if the "T" word is even applicable) so anything from the last few years would probably be an improvement.

    These hints are good. The trouble for me is that I really am CLUELESS when I see them in use, on the showroom floors, or on-line which is what and what the internal quality is.

    I bought this bike as a break from the routine of my road bike. I'm guessing that I'll probably start enjoying this though WAY TOO MUCH and things will get reversed. I'll start riding my road bike as an alternative to the MTB.

    We will see!
    get busy LIVIN or get busy DYIN!

  9. #9
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    Welcome to mountain biking. It is certainly addictive. Just ride the bike and don't worry too much about the fork for now. I had the same fork on my first mountain bike (a '97 GT Karakoram) and it's only slightly more plush than a fully rigid fork and not as stiff laterally or fore and aft but it will do. Plus it will be hard to find a modern fork that will match the 63mm travel of the Indy so while working better they'll also change the handling/geometry of the bike.

    Put some good hard, fun miles on this bike then when you're truly addicted, upgrade the whole thing. Enjoy.

  10. #10
    TNC
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    No way, KRob...

    Quote Originally Posted by KRob
    Welcome to mountain biking. It is certainly addictive. Just ride the bike and don't worry too much about the fork for now. I had the same fork on my first mountain bike (a '97 GT Karakoram) and it's only slightly more plush than a fully rigid fork and not as stiff laterally or fore and aft but it will do. Plus it will be hard to find a modern fork that will match the 63mm travel of the Indy so while working better they'll also change the handling/geometry of the bike.

    Put some good hard, fun miles on this bike then when you're truly addicted, upgrade the whole thing. Enjoy.
    The Indy line is/was the schnitz when it comes to big hit bike forks. I sold my Monster T and kept my Indy SL just for the big stuff.

    LOL!...OK, OK...maybe I'm exaggerating...a little. Check out this blast from the past that is on my...well...I'm not sure what kind of bike you'd call it. Indy SL with Englund air carts that actually have compression and rebound damping. Seriously, the fork is a great commuter/comfort/cruiser bike fork...and the fork weighs almost nothing because everything was alloy on this model. It has enough lateral rigidity to be used as Indiana Jones' bull whip.

    To the original poster, just about everything out there available in the last few years is somewhat of an improvement over the Indy XC...as long as it didn't come on a WalMart bike. Even a cheap Suntour fork at least has some improved lateral rigidity. Like KRob suggested, ride the bike for awhile until you find a good deal on a new or used "later model" fork in the 75-80mm range, and then service the Indy XC and use it on a commuter or cruiser bike that had a rigid fork on it.
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  11. #11
    HOO KOO KRAZY
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    T-h-a-n-k-s

    Yeah, I FINALLY got out on it. Didn't get over anything to dramatic to know the limits of the XC, but the local High School did provide some great fun (stairs, dirt piles, inclines, etc..).

    I'll keep everyone posted on what I do next. Was at a swap meet/flea market on Saturday and had about 5 sets of front suspension right in front of me. They guy was selling them (amidst his BOXES and BINS of misc other parts) for ten bucks each! Probably should have snagged one, but again... had no clue what was new and what was old.

    I really do appreciate the various input.
    get busy LIVIN or get busy DYIN!

  12. #12
    HOO KOO KRAZY
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    TNC - question...

    So what would be the advantage (disadvantage) of a 100mm fork?
    get busy LIVIN or get busy DYIN!

  13. #13
    TNC
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    Depends on bike.

    Quote Originally Posted by sacto
    So what would be the advantage (disadvantage) of a 100mm fork?
    The longer fork you put on any given bike will raise the front end, thereby slacking your front geometry. That may be good or bad depending on your bike's designed head angle and your riding style. Some bikes are very quick handling, almost to a fault. When you put a taller fork on those, it can actually improve handling for many types of riding by relaxing the geometry. On some bikes, the taller fork will be too much, and will cause the front tire to be unable to get a good bite on the ground...especially when climbing. Everything's a compromise.

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