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  1. #1
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    rear shock major screw-up: HELP PLEASE!

    So I wanted to replace my Fox RP23 rear shock. After letting out the air, I unscrewed the front joint (sorry if the terminology is incorrect - I am no native speaker), which went fine (picture 1).

    When I tried to unscrew the back joint, the left side yielded a relatively short screw (picture 4). The right side, however, did not bulge (picture 3). Now it appears that I have damaged the screw and cannot unscrew it any longer!

    This is very depressing! On the other hand, in the front the right side was not really a screw, but simply a hollow bar with a thread inside (picture 5). Hence I was wondering whether maybe I can simply hammer it out from the other side. Can somebody give me some advice? I am rather desperate!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails rear shock major screw-up: HELP PLEASE!-2012-12-29-11.18.43-copy.jpg  

    rear shock major screw-up: HELP PLEASE!-2012-12-29-11.18.39-copy.jpg  

    rear shock major screw-up: HELP PLEASE!-2012-12-29-11.18.24-copy.jpg  

    rear shock major screw-up: HELP PLEASE!-2012-12-29-11.18.06-copy.jpg  

    rear shock major screw-up: HELP PLEASE!-2012-12-29-11.17.41-copy.jpg  

    Last edited by adriano; 12-29-2012 at 03:58 AM.

  2. #2
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    I have uploaded a few more pictures to make it clear where the problem is.

  3. #3
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    Might it help to heat up the whole contraption with a hot-air pistol?

  4. #4
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    Was it a hex head bolt or torx? Hard to tell, but it looks like you stripped the head out? Does the bolt turn freely at all? if it does, you may be able to tap it out from the other side with something long and thin. If it won't turn, you can use a hacksaw (carefully) to cut a groove in the head of the bolt and use a flat head screwdriver to try and remove it.

    Also, looking at the state of the shock etc, you may want to clean your bike before you start dismantling it, take it from me, it make the job a lot easier.
    I don't crash, I just have slightly uncontrolled dismounts!

  5. #5
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    Try threading in the short screw partially and tap on it to drive the bolt on the other side out.

  6. #6
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    Thanks Kiwi. It does not move at all! My hope is that the part with the damaged screwhead is identical to the "long thing" on the upper side of Figure 5 (I don't know how to call it. A bolt?). If so, it may be stuck but it should be pushable with some patience. Is it reasonable to expect a bolt there as well?

    I tried to insert a metal spike from the other side and hit it with a rubberhead hammer - but it didn't move out. However, I didn't push things too hard since I did not want to destroy the whole frame.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by sxross View Post
    Try threading in the short screw partially and tap on it to drive the bolt on the other side out.
    Done that, to no avail - but maybe too lightly. It should be a bolt with an inner thread on the other side, right? It cannot really be another screw? In the latter case I would be "screwed"...

  8. #8
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    If the bolt is the same as the one in pic 4, you should be able to hit it out then, you may have to use a little bit more force. You won't damage the frame unless you go really overboard with the hammering.
    I don't crash, I just have slightly uncontrolled dismounts!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kiwiplague View Post
    If the bolt is the same as the one in pic 4, you should be able to hit it out then, you may have to use a little bit more force. You won't damage the frame unless you go really overboard with the hammering.
    That's what I thought, but I am really worried and disconcerted that it does not move. From your experience with shocks, would the rear side be attached to the frame in the same was as the front side? My worry is that maybe the rear side features something else, like a central barrel with two threads on both sides - what do I know. Although that woudln't make any sense... Sorry for rambling - I am really a bit nervous, it's weekend and great weather outside and I want to get my bike back into shape!

  10. #10
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    Usually they should be the same. No matter how nice the weather is, if you think you will damage your bike further, don't do any more to it, take it to a bike shop on monday and get them to look at it. One weekend of no biking is better than no biking at all because of a broken bike.
    I don't crash, I just have slightly uncontrolled dismounts!

  11. #11
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    I would expect the rear bolt to be similar to the front. It looks like there is a fair amount of corrosion which is probably causing things to stick. Like Sxross said, thread the bolt part way in and tap it out.

  12. #12
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    At this point with the head of the sleeve bolt trashed, don't try to "save" the bolt from further damage; you're going to have to replace it anyway. So you'll need to either clean it up and reassemble in order to ride this weekend then take it to the shop the next time you can or knock that sleeve out and find something else to do until you get a new sleeve and bolt.

    Scrub the shock body eyelets out before you reassemble with the new bolt. I'd say you have some lovely oxidation in there helping bond the bolt sleeve to the body eyelets.

  13. #13
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    Thank you everybody. I appreciate the prompt community help across 16 time zones, from New Zealand to Tennessee (I am in Switzerland). This is why the Internet was invented!!!

    Turns out that I can ride the bike after all. The shock is not (yet) broken, so I just put the left screw back in place, pump up the shock and be done for a while. The primary reason for this whole action was to measure the bushings in order to replace them with the wonderful Huber bushings. This will have to wait though.

    I agree with you that corrosion/oxidation is the most likely reason for the bolt being glued to the eyelets. At least now I know that there is a problem there. My incredibly talented bike shop guy is out until Jan 8th (good for him), but I believe that I can bear until then...

  14. #14
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    When you replace that sleeve bolt, make sure to lightly grease or anti-seize the "sleeve".

  15. #15
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    So, I removed the entire big enchilada, with the shock and its "receiver" (apparently called the "link") from which it cannot be separated. I am soaking the screw receptacle with WD-40, and will let it stand overnight - and hope for the best...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails rear shock major screw-up: HELP PLEASE!-2012-12-29-16.51.29-copy.jpg  

    Last edited by adriano; 12-29-2012 at 09:39 AM.

  16. #16
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    It appears the reducer and the pin/bolt have fused together via galvanic corrosion. I can tell you right now that DW40 is not going to help. The only method is the mechanically break that corrosive bond. Get a hugh hammer and a punch the same diameter or if you have a press that would be easier. The bad guy in this is those Fox Hat Style reducers......they are not anodized and aluminum oxidizes/corrodes no matter what material the fastener is made from.

    Too all those still user the Fox Hat Style reducers.....toss them in the garbage.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by adriano View Post
    So, I removed the entire big enchilada, with the shock and its "receiver" (apparently called the "link") from which it cannot be separated. I am soaking the screw receptacle with WD-40, and will let it stand overnight - and hope for the best...
    Same thing happened to a friends bike. He removed the shock and rocker plates as you have done. He took a block of wood and drilled a 7/16" hole (allow for shock bolt to pass thru) and then place the rocker assembly on its side - took a hammer and punch and drove the bolt out (a press and arbor might have been nicer). It was very important to support the lower plate or it might have cracked.
    Last edited by keen; 12-29-2012 at 11:52 AM.

  18. #18
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    thank you so much friends! Now, can you tell me what kind of press I should get? Like could you google some images and share the links with me? Sorry for being a nag - I am quite inexperienced when it comes to mechanics as you have already realized (molecular biology is another matter, there I wouldn't need any handholding...)

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by adriano View Post
    thank you so much friends! Now, can you tell me what kind of press I should get? Like could you google some images and share the links with me? Sorry for being a nag - I am quite inexperienced when it comes to mechanics as you have already realized (molecular biology is another matter, there I wouldn't need any handholding...)
    just google search these terms: Mechanical Arbor Press Or I am sure any good shop will have a press.

  20. #20
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    If you put the allen key in a vise, *edit can you leverage the shock or rocker plate free?
    Last edited by Deerhill; 12-29-2012 at 11:38 AM.
    ...

  21. #21
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    tried everything, including vise and hammering again - but no luck. The darn thing is soldered fast. Oh well, I will get a press (turns out that it's not expensive), but for good measure I will buy a new "shock link".

    Anybody knows whether this link is what I need for a Cannondale Rize 1 carbon? It says "Rize 130" but I am not sure if it's the same thing. At 60$ it is annoying but bearable...

  22. #22
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    When I am working on cars motorsports or mountain bikes and something strips I use a Drexel with a cutting disc and cut a slit in the head of the bolt take my flat head and a hammer put the flat head in and hack the screw driver a few times and try to turn if that doesn't work. Not sure which screwdrivers you have but my snap on ones can use a wrench on it as we'll to add more leverage to budge the bolt out

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by shreddin22 View Post
    When I am working on cars motorsports or mountain bikes and something strips I use a Drexel with a cutting disc and cut a slit in the head of the bolt take my flat head and a hammer put the flat head in and hack the screw driver a few times and try to turn if that doesn't work. Not sure which screwdrivers you have but my snap on ones can use a wrench on it as we'll to add more leverage to budge the bolt out
    That's a cool technology - thanx! It will be my "Plan B".

  24. #24
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    Use your vise and a socket as a press
    ...

  25. #25
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    an impact driver tool like this might help you break it free. cut a slot in the bolt and use the slot head bit to try and spin the bolt. bonus is you get to wail on it with a hammer!

    Last edited by FullMonty; 12-29-2012 at 09:42 PM.

  26. #26
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    That might work as well if you have an impact driver just make sure you have good tips.

  27. #27
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    I'd think he could drill out the bolt. I had to do that with rivets on my 4x4 to replace a leafspring mount. You start with a tiny pilot bit in the middle of the bolt/screw. Then continue to move up a size until the bolt pops loose. Not hard at all, just a little time consuming.
    Just because you can't hear them scream doesn't mean they don't. Save a plant, eat meat.

  28. #28
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    Yes you can drill rivets out but they are designed differently than a bolt. If you drill the bolt out if there are any threads in there you are going to wipe them all out. Drilling rivets is just about the only way to remove them. Bolts I wouldn't do that unless you are drilling something where the threadedart is strong because you are going to have to re tap the hole or helacoil it

  29. #29
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    Threaded part*

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by shreddin22 View Post
    Yes you can drill rivets out but they are designed differently than a bolt. If you drill the bolt out if there are any threads in there you are going to wipe them all out. Drilling rivets is just about the only way to remove them. Bolts I wouldn't do that unless you are drilling something where the threadedart is strong because you are going to have to re tap the hole or helacoil it
    Good point. Thanks for catching that. I wasn't thinking of the threads.
    Just because you can't hear them scream doesn't mean they don't. Save a plant, eat meat.

  31. #31
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    Actually as you can see here the only thread is inside the bolt, which is doomed anyway. Hence the thread issue is not critical.

    I happen to possess a really powerful Bosch impact drill. With this guy I have drilled holes through reinforced concrete like it was butter (almost). Would that be a good power tool for this task? If so, which kind of bit would have to be used? Note that I would still prefer the "pop-out" strategy over the "drill-away" option...

  32. #32
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    Have u tried cutting a slit in it. Like I suggested. Drilling should be your last resort. If you don't drill it dead straight you run the risk of damaged the housing and drilling right thought it. Going to need a strong bit. And some lube to cool the bit down. Good luck to you

  33. #33
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    If you drill, you want to start with a small bit and work up size by size. The largest bit that you want needs to be just a hair smaller than the diameter of the screw/bolt shaft. You don't want to damage the surrounding metal. As shreddin said you need lube to keep it cool. It'll make the drilling quite a bit easier.
    Just because you can't hear them scream doesn't mean they don't. Save a plant, eat meat.

  34. #34
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    Another option is trying a bolt remover. Because of my post limit, I'm not allowed to add a link, but they are easily found by typing "Craftsman screw out bolt remover" I've had luck with removing rusted out screws. The bolt head on your bike is already fried, so it can't hurt.

  35. #35
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    Damn! I'm dying to know what he did and if he succeded.

  36. #36
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    I did succeed - but it was painful and bloody!

    First I flooded the hole with rust remover (I tried WD40 before to no avail). Then I cut through the shock bushing with a Dremel and a diamond disc. This was very fast and easy. In addition, I cut a slit on the head of the bolt to create a position for the screwdriver.

    At this point, the bolt came out with no effort at all!

    Shock and shocklink were undamaged. The bushing however was dead. In the meantime I had ordered (and received) new bushings and gliding reducers from Stephan Huber (Huber Bushings - High Precision Shock Bushings) which cost little and are great. Because Stephan's reducers are made of Teflon, and the bushings are anodized, these issues will never arise again. Stephan also sells a little tool for extracting the reducer, which made the procedure fast, precise, and painless.

    So there was a happy end - you would think. Regrettably my woes did not end. In the interim I found that the same thing had happened to the ball bearings connecting the shocklink to the seatstay. The outer ring of the bearing was "soldered" to the seatsay, and the inner ring was firmly attached to the pivot screw. When I removed the screw, the bearing fell apart and all the little balls fell off.

    I won't bore you with the whole story, but in the end I had no choice but to replace the seatstay (in addition to bearings and screws). Fortunately I found a used carbon seatstay on ebay for 40$. It has a few scratches but it is functional, does not seem to have any inner damage, and the bearings are OK.

    Anyway, my bike is back to functional state and I had a great ride yesterday. Thank you to everybody who advised and helped here!

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