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  1. #1
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    Putting Air in Fox Float RL Shock?

    How the heck do I do it? Is it possible with a regular bike pump?

  2. #2
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    You need a shock pump. Remove air cap from left leg (non-drive side), thread on shock pump, pump to correct psi, remove, reinstall air cap.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72 View Post
    You need a shock pump. Remove air cap from left leg (non-drive side), thread on shock pump, pump to correct psi, remove, reinstall air cap.
    I think he's talking about a rear shock.

    Either way, yeah you should get a shock pump. they have small barrels, an accurate gauge, and are designed for high pressure.
    - A tiny amount of air can make a big difference in pressure, and
    - A small change in pressure can have a big effect on the shock performance.

    You need a pump with a gauge on it because just measuring the pressure with a separate gauge changes it. And you might need around 150 psi or so. Most tire pumps wo go that high and don't have gauges that high. Plus, they push too much volume to make a small adjustment.

    Probably a $25 investment for a nice little shock pump.

  4. #4
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    I would get a shock pump but the thing is I would only be using it this one time (I'm fixing up my manager's bike). I was able to get some air in the shock but it bottoms out pretty easily. I'm going to try out the air tank later, as long as the head fits on the valve (it's a tight squeeze)...

  5. #5
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    If you have a bike with a shock, you need a shock pump to make occasional adjustments anyway. You could take it to a shop and they might pump it up for free. Or borrow one.

  6. #6
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    Shock pump.

    Doh. Too late on my part. That's what I get when leaving a page up for too long.

  7. #7
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    I tried out my CO2 tire inflater and it worked quite nicely lol, not too soft but not too stiff. It was kind of scary though, filled it up in a fraction of a second and it was quite loud

  8. #8
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    Don't worry, I won't, almost made my pants brown, and I don't like when I do that...

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxxdout View Post
    I tried out my CO2 tire inflater and it worked quite nicely lol, not too soft but not too stiff. It was kind of scary though, filled it up in a fraction of a second and it was quite loud
    Jeez Loueeeeze don't do that ever again!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxxdout View Post
    I tried out my CO2 tire inflater and it worked quite nicely lol, not too soft but not too stiff. It was kind of scary though, filled it up in a fraction of a second and it was quite loud
    You probably should not work on bicycles...

  11. #11
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    I've worked on bicycles before but this is the first one I've worked on with an air shock. Did I screw up by putting CO2 in the shock? If so, tell me so I can take it out and just bring it by the bike shop tomorrow and have them fill the shock with a shock pump...

  12. #12
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    If it's a FOX rear shock start out with 10lbs over your weight. If its a FOX fork, start out with 50% of your weight....
    ...and proud member of the anti-sock puppet desolation

  13. #13
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    It's a rear shock. He weighs less than me, around 190 maybe, so I took some out of it because it was too stiff for me, but now it's good.

    Also, he's not much of a mountain biker. He bought the bike because he has like 130 acres and money. He said he hasn't rid it in 2 years. I cleaned the crap out of it, it was in kind of rough shape, needed pretty much everything adjusted (besides the rims, they are perfectely straight). I took it through the trails and it kicks major behind. He's going to be happy. I'm going to ask if he plans on selling it in the future because I love this bike. It's an 05 Cannondale Jekyll.

  14. #14
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    As mentioned before, you need a SHOCK PUMP for air shocks and forks...there is no substitute for this. How is it you can control the volume and pressure with a CO2 pump? It's a crapshot, your lucky you didn't blow the seals.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxxdout View Post
    I've worked on bicycles before but this is the first one I've worked on with an air shock. Did I screw up by putting CO2 in the shock? If so, tell me so I can take it out and just bring it by the bike shop tomorrow and have them fill the shock with a shock pump...
    CO2 Expands and contracts terribly with temperature changes. I definitely would not use it.

  16. #16
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    I don't think CO2 is any problem at all.
    What you risked however, is blowing up the shock, which could have been a serious injury to yourself.
    Those canisters, in order to fill up an entire tire up to 40 pounds or so, need to have several hundred pounds of pressure in them (just an estimate, it might be 1000, I dont know). The can might be rated to three or four hundred, again I don't know. That's the point. You don't know either. The sudden over pressure of the aluminum can could have burst it. The seals might give way first, but not necessarily. It wasn't a smart move. But I'm glad it all worked out.

  17. #17
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    Well damn, I feel like a retard. Ill see if i can stop by the lbs tomorrow and have them properly fill up the shock...

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxxdout View Post
    Well damn, I feel like a retard. Ill see if i can stop by the lbs tomorrow and have them properly fill up the shock...
    Well its already full. If the pressure seems ok, then you got lucky and you are done. CO2 isn't going to perform differently than air (maybe even better since oxygen in air attacks the rubber seals). Don't worry about the CO2.

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