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  1. #1
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    Please help me with my vanilla r (06)

    Well, I just got a new Kona Coiler (06) and the rear shock's spring was waaaaaaaaay to heavy (700) so, I decided to take off the shock and swap coils... here's the problemo...

    I need to get off this bolt that is going through the eye of the shock, but I cannot figure out how the heck to get it out... check out the pic. I attached for details.

    Any help is much appreciated :]
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  2. #2
    Master of None
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    That's called a shock eye reducer, and it should pull right out. The pro way to get those stuck ones out is to use a bolt extractor, but you can try to wrap something around it so you don't scratch it up and pull it out with some vice grips. A slight twisting motion will help pull it out.

  3. #3
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    Thank you VERY much... even tho it's not gonna do much help now, because I took it in to my LBS and the guy told me that if I put in a lighter spring, it will bottom out to much, which will void the warranty on my coiler, and he said that it would make the frame crack... personally I really dont believe this crap... what's your say?

  4. #4
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    Use this calculator to determine what spring rate you need, and no it should not void your warranty. Make sure you get the correct spring length. I believe the coiler is 7.785 x 2.0

    Mountain Bike Spring Rate Calculator V5.0

  5. #5
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    yeah I already have an old x-fusion spring that I'm gonna slap on there if its not gonna hurt my bike.. it's the same as the stock coil, except it' 550 lb.

  6. #6
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    Make sure it's not too soft. You should have about 30% sag. Measure the distance between the shock eyes with you off the bike, and then measure again with you in the "attack position," like you would be in when riding downhill. The second measurement should be 30% less than the first. If you have more sag than that you could bottom out the shock and damage the frame or other parts.

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