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Thread: Pike 2014

  1. #201
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    I was under the impression that the dual position forks were only available in white.

  2. #202
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    All part numbers for all RockShox product is here:

    http://cdn.sram.com/cdn/farfuture/pG..._spc_rev_a.pdf

    If you want to know if you can swap lowers to convert from 26 to 275 or whatever, this will tell you. Not overtly, but you'll have to see what parts are used for each fork.

    My 2012 Revelation 26" solo air fork uses all the same internals as the 275 version so I just bought lowers and installed them to convert my fork.

    mk
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  3. #203
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    Quote Originally Posted by trailbildr View Post
    All part numbers for all RockShox product is here:

    http://cdn.sram.com/cdn/farfuture/pG..._spc_rev_a.pdf

    If you want to know if you can swap lowers to convert from 26 to 275 or whatever, this will tell you. Not overtly, but you'll have to see what parts are used for each fork.

    My 2012 Revelation 26" solo air fork uses all the same internals as the 275 version so I just bought lowers and installed them to convert my fork.

    mk
    This is gold. Thanks for posting.

  4. #204
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    The SRAM service site is FULL of good stuff. It's the first place to go, really...

    Service Resources - RockShox | SRAM

    mk
    TrailWerks Cyclery
    TrailWerks Suspension Service

    trailwerkscyclery.com

  5. #205
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    Killer fork. I have a 2014 S-works Enduro with the 160mm. I've played with it a lot and have the tokens and preload set how I like.

    For HIGH speed square edge hits, am I the only one who feels this fork has too much high-speed compression? I'm wishing for a bit more low speed comp, and less high speed comp, for some good blow off.
    Bend, Oregon

  6. #206
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    How fast are you going and through what kind of terrain? At the ski resort I don't think it has too much all, nor through really chunky sharp rocks. The "blow off" is very seemless with this fork, but the air-spring curve makes it resist using travel IMO, not so much the low speed compression.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  7. #207
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pau11y View Post

    I like to set the compression damping to non-existent for climbs so the front wheel can follow the ground w/o any of my weight on the bar. On the downs, turn to the middle of the RCT3 setting to get some mid-stroke support. This was how I rode the Fox 34 to pretty good effect.
    Are you talking about the clicking low speed compression dial here tg the middle, or flipping the blue lever to the middle setting?

  8. #208
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    Quote Originally Posted by BushPilot View Post
    Are you talking about the clicking low speed compression dial here tg the middle, or flipping the blue lever to the middle setting?
    I think the LSC (maybe I'm using the wrong term) is in the middle of the blue lever? Anyway, that's backed all the way out. The 3 RCT settings is set to the lightest damping also. Basically, as low of a compression setting as possible so the fork will compress w/ the minimal amount of force. When I go down, I'm referring to flipping the blue lever.

    Oh BTW, I set my sag at that lightest comp damping setting. The air pressure is a LOT lower than you'd get from their chart, even w/ 2 tokens in. I went for a ride yesterday and was running a touch above 45psi and I still had an inch of travel I didn't use w/ the lowest comp damping. It was a slower out/back trail w/ more tech. And, I didn't even bother flipping the blue lever to the middle of the 3 RCT setting on the downs.
    Naysayers never apologize. Critics go to their grave thinking everyone else is wrong.
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  9. #209
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    How fast are you going and through what kind of terrain? At the ski resort I don't think it has too much all, nor through really chunky sharp rocks. The "blow off" is very seemless with this fork, but the air-spring curve makes it resist using travel IMO, not so much the low speed compression.
    Any normal 4" tall rock at 20mph feels pretty abrupt. I generally would run a bit more pressure than most, in my forks in the past, but 75 psi at 195lbs I don't think is out of line with this fork. 75 psi with no volume spacers(stock one removed), for the most linear feel I can get, while keeping the front end high, I am happy with the slow speed feel and diving in berms, but the high speed valving does feel stiff.

    I also have the rebound all the way open, and it's still not "too fast" yet. Makes me wonder if my fork was assembled with a heavier weight oil or something.
    Bend, Oregon

  10. #210
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    Gotcha. Thanks! I'm running a just little over 50 psi with two tokens. It is plush but a little divey under hard braking. Although I have not totally bottomed the fork yet even with hard landings. I have had the lsc knob backed all the way out too, so starting to experiment with bumping it up a little and well as flipping the lever to the mid setting like you've been doing. I notice turning the knob and also maybe flipping the lever affect the rebound speed.

  11. #211
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    Removed my lowers to inspect after about 5 rides. I got 3 drips out of one lower, and and MAYBE a teaspoon full out of the other. I know the spec oil volume is small, but this was REALLY dry.

    Some PTFE seal grease pushed into foam ring, and filling the seals, and some 7wt shock oil(lighter for cold season) in the lowers, and the fork is AMAZINGLY more compliant. The slow rebound I was noting two posts up, is substantially faster. I thought it was buttery before it is REALLY buttery now!

    I also played with the bare cartridge, and I am now confident that I was wrong two posts up, and there is not too much high speed compression. I could blast on that thing with the adjusters full open with very little restriction.
    Last edited by thuren; 09-27-2013 at 04:17 PM.
    Bend, Oregon

  12. #212
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    Quote Originally Posted by thuren View Post
    Removed my lowers to inspect after about 5 rides. I got 3 drips out of one lower, and and MAYBE a teaspoon full out of the other. I know the spec oil volume is small, but this was REALLY dry.

    Some PTFE seal grease pushed into foam ring, and filling the seals, and some 7wt shock oil(lighter for cold season) in the lowers, and the fork is AMAZINGLY more compliant. The slow rebound I was noting two posts up, is substantially faster. I thought it was buttery before it is REALLY buttery now!

    I also played with the bare cartridge, and I am not confident that I was wrong two posts up, and there is not too much high speed compression. I could blast on that thing with the adjusters full open with very little restriction.
    Is there a good set of rebuild instructions out yet?

  13. #213
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    I'm cracking it open in a few hrs or service the oil bath with the recommended 0w30 oil.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  14. #214
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    Quote Originally Posted by hillharman View Post
    Is there a good set of rebuild instructions out yet?
    I have not seen full rebuild instructions, but this is for servicing the lowers.

    http://cdn.sram.com/cdn/farfuture/mS...ice_manual.pdf
    Bend, Oregon

  15. #215
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    I'm cracking it open in a few hrs or service the oil bath with the recommended 0w30 oil.
    What oil are you guys using? Thanks for the service instruction link.

  16. #216
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    Such a great thread - loving my new Pike 150mm on the Knolly Endo. It was reading all the initial reviews / comments on this thread that put me over the edge. Thanks guys.

    After throwing the fork on the bike - i quickly set the sag and didnt touch a single setting - felt awesome right away.

    Stoked.
    I support EMBA

  17. #217
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    Quote Originally Posted by hillharman View Post
    What oil are you guys using? Thanks for the service instruction link.
    0w30, Mobile, that's what is specified. About the right amount came out of the left leg. Nothing came out of the right. 5ml is almost nothing... Changing this oil was easy though, no surprises.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  18. #218
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    Great thread. Interestingly enough my 140mm pike solo came with 2 tokens installed and two more in the bag. With 2 installed I had about 70psi and I wasn't using all of the travel. I just removed one and bumped up the pressure to 90 (sag set at exactly 20%). Unfortunately I won't be able to ride until at least next wednesday to see if it made any difference. I might pull the lowers now to see what kind of oil volume is in mine in the mean time. FWIW I'm about 190lbs without gear.

  19. #219
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    My experience has been with two tokens installed, vs no token, and same 20% sag I am using more travel and fork feels much more supple. At 155lbs body weight, I am running 47lbs psi with two tokens and 55psi with no tokens. I wish there was more tokens that came in the box with fork.
    sth

  20. #220
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    I am finding that pressures and settings, from rider to rider, vary a LOT with this fork. Weight plays a part naturally, but I'm starting to think that riding style plays a bigger part with tuning this fork, as the fork is so smooth, you can feel the changes more than normal.

    I'm 190-200lbs geared up(depending on Camelback or not).

    I had one token in stock, and with 65psi I felt like the fork was too mushy, even with the low speed all the way in. Rebound was also too slow for me also, with the knob full open. Use of travel was great on big hits.

    I now am at 76psi with no tokens, and I am WAY happier. Faster rebound, low speed compression all the way in, plus the extra pressure, now staying high in the supple part of the stroke. Using full travel, and not diving in corners.
    Bend, Oregon

  21. #221
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    Quote Originally Posted by thuren View Post
    I am finding that pressures and settings, from rider to rider, vary a LOT with this fork. Weight plays a part naturally, but I'm starting to think that riding style plays a bigger part with tuning this fork, as the fork is so smooth, you can feel the changes more than normal.

    I'm 190-200lbs geared up(depending on Camelback or not).

    I had one token in stock, and with 65psi I felt like the fork was too mushy, even with the low speed all the way in. Rebound was also too slow for me also, with the knob full open. Use of travel was great on big hits.

    I now am at 76psi with no tokens, and I am WAY happier. Faster rebound, low speed compression all the way in, plus the extra pressure, now staying high in the supple part of the stroke. Using full travel, and not diving in corners.

    How is it for the high speed hits? Still ruff or did adding oil smooth out those high speed hits? You guys have me thinking of leaving coil for the first time since.........ever! How is the tracking? Wheel glued to the ground at high speeds or does it skip around a bit?

  22. #222
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    Pike 2014

    Quote Originally Posted by Swissam View Post
    How is it for the high speed hits? Still ruff or did adding oil smooth out those high speed hits? You guys have me thinking of leaving coil for the first time since.........ever! How is the tracking? Wheel glued to the ground at high speeds or does it skip around a bit?
    For me, the high speed comp is excellent. I had a 2013 and 2014 Fox 34 before this and they would both skip around and feel harsh or wallowy as I toyed with settings. Pretty much right out of the box the Pike was insanely controlled, and I find myself plowing through sections that made me nervous before. I can actually correct my lines through really rough stuff rather than worrying about being super careful to pick the smoothest one at the top of a chunky section. So. Much. Fun.

  23. #223
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swissam View Post
    How is it for the high speed hits? Still ruff or did adding oil smooth out those high speed hits? You guys have me thinking of leaving coil for the first time since.........ever! How is the tracking? Wheel glued to the ground at high speeds or does it skip around a bit?
    It's the most comparable fork to a coil I have tried. My problem with air forks has been never using full travel, as I like lots of pressure to keep the front end high, and rebound fast, like a coil. At that pressure, it would be RARE I would get full travel with other forks.

    I would always do a test with my fork, from my DH days. I would roll about 5mph, and with my weight full force, ALL the strength I had, try my hardest to bottom the fork. If it bottomed easy, I would add compression. Not use full travel, remove compression.

    My last few Fox forks, when set up riding and handling like I wanted, I would always come up about an inch short doing this test, as the air pressure ramped up too much.

    This Pike is the first fork I've owned, that when I have the pressure "right" for me, that I can use 90%-100% of the travel easily, doing this test.....

    EDIT: I am SUPER picky regarding the way suspension feels, on TRUE "high shaft speed" hits. At first my Pike was a bit sticky masking bad high-speed compression performance. Once I dropped the lowers, greased and lubed, all good super fast acting on the high speed.
    Bend, Oregon

  24. #224
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    Quote Originally Posted by thuren View Post
    It's the most comparable fork to a coil I have tried. My problem with air forks has been never using full travel, as I like lots of pressure to keep the front end high, and rebound fast, like a coil. At that pressure, it would be RARE I would get full travel with other forks.

    I would always do a test with my fork, from my DH days. I would roll about 5mph, and with my weight full force, ALL the strength I had, try my hardest to bottom the fork. If it bottomed easy, I would add compression. Not use full travel, remove compression.

    My last few Fox forks, when set up riding and handling like I wanted, I would always come up about an inch short doing this test, as the air pressure ramped up too much.

    This Pike is the first fork I've owned, that when I have the pressure "right" for me, that I can use 90%-100% of the travel easily, doing this test.....

    EDIT: I am SUPER picky regarding the way suspension feels, on TRUE "high shaft speed" hits. At first my Pike was a bit sticky masking bad high-speed compression performance. Once I dropped the lowers, greased and lubed, all good super fast acting on the high speed.
    I've also noticed a bit of a break in period on my Pike. It started out still plusher than my 2013 Fox 34, but has gotten even better since then.

  25. #225
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    Quote Originally Posted by thuren View Post
    EDIT: I am SUPER picky regarding the way suspension feels, on TRUE "high shaft speed" hits. At first my Pike was a bit sticky masking bad high-speed compression performance. Once I dropped the lowers, greased and lubed, all good super fast acting on the high speed.
    Thanks for the post. You have me thinking that I need to open up the shock and check the oil level, and do essentially what you did. Haven't opened up a fork before, so I'm a bit nervous about it, but it can't be that bad. Do you need any special tools? And when you say "greased", what did you grease?

  26. #226
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    Quote Originally Posted by White Bear View Post
    Thanks for the post. You have me thinking that I need to open up the shock and check the oil level, and do essentially what you did. Haven't opened up a fork before, so I'm a bit nervous about it, but it can't be that bad. Do you need any special tools? And when you say "greased", what did you grease?
    Rubber mallet. For ages RS has used damping/dummy shafts that press into the lowers, so you need a rubber mallet to knock them up into the fork (with the bike turned upside down. Then simply turn it upside down and see what comes out. Add the required oil to both sides, reinstall foot-nuts and adjuster knob, good to go. Since it's not an "open bath damper", you don't have to worry about a huge mess of oil.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  27. #227
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    Cool-blue Rhythm

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Rubber mallet. Then simply turn it upside down and see what comes out. Add the required oil to both sides, reinstall foot-nuts and adjuster knob, good to go. Since it's not an "open bath damper", you don't have to worry about a huge mess of oil.
    OMG, gotta do a YouTube video of me whacking my $1100 fork and watching parts fall out the bottom! Not sure the huevos are that big!

  28. #228
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    Quote Originally Posted by White Bear View Post
    OMG, gotta do a YouTube video of me whacking my $1100 fork and watching parts fall out the bottom! Not sure the huevos are that big!
    This is normal procedure to drop the lowers on pretty much any modern fork.

    So, get a friend to help who has done this before, or resign yourself to paying someone else to do it.

  29. #229
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    SRAM's youtube channel have lots of useful videos: SRAMtech - YouTube

    <iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Yl0GdF0w5hI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

  30. #230
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    So does the pike and monarch rc3 come with remote? I don't belive they do but I could be wrong. At first I thought who needs remote control for a shock or fork? (prejudice stemming from much earlier carnations) However out on a very rough trail today (a more open setting) were a few rock lips, small jumps and what have you when I realized how much more fun and more air I could have if I had one switch to control both fork and shock, being able to flip up the compression on the fly getting more pop off a jump then flip it back to open and how that could make the DH that much more fun. I had always looked at the remote suspension as more of a climbing feature until today. Or am I wrong and remotes suck?

  31. #231
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    Today I noticed that my fork would make a sound as though it was topping out when the fork traveled from compressed to fully extended. I've been riding the 29'er Solo 140 for a couple of months now and this is the first time noticing this sound. Any concerns?

  32. #232
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    Quote Originally Posted by trailbildr View Post
    All part numbers for all RockShox product is here:

    http://cdn.sram.com/cdn/farfuture/pG..._spc_rev_a.pdf

    If you want to know if you can swap lowers to convert from 26 to 275 or whatever, this will tell you. Not overtly, but you'll have to see what parts are used for each fork.

    My 2012 Revelation 26" solo air fork uses all the same internals as the 275 version so I just bought lowers and installed them to convert my fork.

    mk
    So just change the lowers, and voila, you got a 27.5 Revelation? That might be a great way to get into 650b.
    Faster is not always better, but it's always more fun

  33. #233
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    Today I reached for my rebound knob and to my surprise, it was gone??? Will this be an easy LBS item to purchase?

  34. #234
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    Quote Originally Posted by bassn View Post
    Today I reached for my rebound knob and to my surprise, it was gone??? Will this be an easy LBS item to purchase?
    Not exactly an unusual occurrence with Rockshox forks. Can be a good idea to set your rebound and then remove the knob and keep it in a safe place, i.e. in your camelbak (if you use one).
    Your lbs should be able to order one in for you.
    I don't crash, I just have slightly uncontrolled dismounts!

  35. #235
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    Quote Originally Posted by bassn View Post
    Today I noticed that my fork would make a sound as though it was topping out when the fork traveled from compressed to fully extended. I've been riding the 29'er Solo 140 for a couple of months now and this is the first time noticing this sound. Any concerns?
    Anyone else experiencing such a sound/feel? I'm not the most experienced when it comes to suspension issues, but it does feel abnormal. Today I will check the fluid levels on the lowers to see if that might be the culprit. It's just weird that it happened all of a sudden???

  36. #236
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    Some noise is not abnormal when running excessive rebound. Supposedly the charger can handle lots of rebound damping, but I'd still question your setting (how many clicks?). Otherwise, it could mean air in the damping cartridge, but you'd likely notice this as a lack of damping. The noise could be air just escaping/entering the damping leg, which is hollow obviously.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  37. #237
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Some noise is not abnormal when running excessive rebound. Supposedly the charger can handle lots of rebound damping, but I'd still question your setting (how many clicks?). Otherwise, it could mean air in the damping cartridge, but you'd likely notice this as a lack of damping. The noise could be air just escaping/entering the damping leg, which is hollow obviously.
    Thanks for replying. I'm running my rebound in the middle of the setting. Since my rebound knob fell, I couldn't tell you how many clicks. It's more of a slight thunk sound.

  38. #238
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    What do you guys think about a separate thread for "PREFERRED PIKE SETTINGS". I could see something like the following would be helpful:
    1) Rider weight
    2) Fork length
    3) # of tokens
    4) LSC (clicks)
    5) measured SAG
    6) PSI
    7) maybe type of use

    Other ideas?

  39. #239
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    Pike 2014

    Wheel size. I believe all 3 have different air chamber volumes.

  40. #240
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    Quote Originally Posted by White Bear View Post
    What do you guys think about a separate thread for "PREFERRED PIKE SETTINGS". I could see something like the following would be helpful:
    1) Rider weight
    2) Fork length
    3) # of tokens
    4) LSC (clicks)
    5) measured SAG
    6) PSI
    7) maybe type of use

    Other ideas?
    Great idea in theory... but useless in reality. Type of trails ridden, rider skill, rider aggressiveness, rider preferences and so on have a huge impact.

    Actually the biggest issue is that some people have no idea how to properly adjust their fork and shouldn't be used as a reference. They might be happy or at least content with the way it performs, but their settings won't help someone else get their fork tuned right.

  41. #241
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    What are the best tuning options do increase small bump sensitivity without bottoming.
    1) lower PSI, add tokens
    2) lower PSI, less rebound dampening (quicker rebound)
    3) lower PSI, increase LSC
    4) other suggestions

    Currently running 0-2 clicks of LSC
    8-10 clicks in from full out of rebound
    1 token
    22.65% sag
    Any thoughts are appreciated.

  42. #242
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    A combination of all of the above for me. I ended up adding 2 tokens, running about 25% sag ( a bit over 50 psi) and a couple clicks of lsc. I don't often use all the travel and it's plush.

  43. #243
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    Quote Originally Posted by G-AIR View Post
    2) lower PSI, less rebound dampening (quicker rebound)
    3) lower PSI, increase LSC
    Combo of the above. My recommended air pressure is 75psi but after playing with the forks, I ended up running 60psi (gives me 25% sag) and no tockens + 3 clicks of LSC and slighlty quicker rebound..... SUPER happy with the forks. Actually, blown away by these forks.

  44. #244
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    150 solo, 160 solo or 160 dual?

    Hi MTBR

    Here's my first and quite heavy post on the forum - hope you can help me

    I recently bought a used black 2012 Yeti SB-66 alloy with the standard 150mm Fox Float 32 without kashima. So stoked about the bike in general but the fork seems a little flimsy during high speed and rough stuff, and not that sensitive when it comes to small bumps and plushness overall.

    Therefore I'm considering an upgrade to the RS PIKE.

    But I'm in doubt on which model to choose.

    I'm living in flat Denmark and most of my riding is in local forests with a lot of short climbs and descents. My riding style is aggressive cross country moving into all mountain. I like to do drops (currently up to 4 ft) and I'm working on improving my airtime. Occasionally I'll bring the bike to the Alps and serious mountains abroad, but I'll mostly use the bike in more modest topography.

    The obvious choice would be the 150mm solo black version, because it's the "natural" travel length with which my bike was "born". With my current fork I sometimes miss a little extra travel ... whether that's due to the fact that my current fork isn't using all of it's travel or that it's too harsh - I cannot tell. (I'm 88kg in full gear and the fork is set to 75psi, sag is around 30%))

    The second option would be the 160mm solo version also in black. I do not mind a slack geometry on the straights and descents, but I'm concerned that the bike would become too cumbersome while climbing.

    The third option and probably the one I think is the most interesting, is the Dual Position 160mm. Being able to lower the fork 30mm while climbing, sounds very appealing to me, but it has a significant drawback: the fork only comes in white!! which will not match my bike!!

    Do you guys know if the 160mm Dual Position will be available in black in the foreseeable future? And if not; I'll definitely consider doing a custom paint job on a white fork if the dual position turns out to be the right choice for me and my riding style.

    Please forgive me for all my questions but which fork do you guys think I should go for considering my style of riding and aesthetic preferences?

    Pike 2014-dsc_1418.jpg

  45. #245
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by G-AIR View Post
    What are the best tuning options do increase small bump sensitivity without bottoming.
    1) lower PSI, add tokens
    2) lower PSI, less rebound dampening (quicker rebound)
    3) lower PSI, increase LSC
    4) other suggestions

    Currently running 0-2 clicks of LSC
    8-10 clicks in from full out of rebound
    1 token
    22.65% sag
    Any thoughts are appreciated.
    So you bought one huh?

    Forgot to add:

    me: about 215 RTR weight, fork is on a Knolly Endorphin
    70psi, puts me right at 25% sag, maybe 28%, can't quite remember
    rebound is about in the middle, maybe a few clicks to the fast side
    LSC is about 6 clicks out from closed
    two tokens

    It's plush as can be, and I typically have just about 1/2" of travel left after riding my normal trail with a few small jumps and drops. I love this fork.
    If jackasses could fly this place would be an airport.

  46. #246
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    First I admitted I have a problem. Then I bought the fork.

    It's been great so far, just trying to get it completely dialed. It's a great fork for the Endo. The Revelation wasn't bad and matched very well with the CTD. The Pike just does everything a bit better. The Pike is actually lighter than the revelation I had as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by rscecil007 View Post
    So you bought one huh?

    Forgot to add:

    me: about 215 RTR weight, fork is on a Knolly Endorphin
    70psi, puts me right at 25% sag, maybe 28%, can't quite remember
    rebound is about in the middle, maybe a few clicks to the fast side
    LSC is about 6 clicks out from closed
    two tokens

    It's plush as can be, and I typically have just about 1/2" of travel left after riding my normal trail with a few small jumps and drops. I love this fork.

  47. #247
    Pivoteer
    Reputation: tiSS'er's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by G-AIR View Post
    First I admitted I have a problem. Then I bought the fork.

    It's been great so far, just trying to get it completely dialed. It's a great fork for the Endo. The Revelation wasn't bad and matched very well with the CTD. The Pike just does everything a bit better. The Pike is actually lighter than the revelation I had as well.
    Very, very nice. I gotta admit, a Warden with a Pike and a XX1 setup is sounding more and more appealing. Seems like it is butter right out of the box. PG has 2 29er versions and they are sweet. Game changing fork for sure. How are they for stiffness? Lyrik worthy or close?
    Employed by Pivot Cycles - www.pivotcycles.com

  48. #248
    Te mortuo heres tibi sim?
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiSS'er View Post
    Lyrik worthy or close?
    Yes. Have spent significant time on Revelation and Lyrik forks in the past, swapping out on the same frames, using the same wheel.

    Stiffer than my 20mm axle tapered Revelation - noticably so. Feels no more or less stiff than the straight steerer tubed Lyrik to me. Don't know how it would feel compared to a tapered Lyrik though.

    The 15mm setup is a non-issue on this fork, IMO, unless you also have to spring for new wheel vs. having a hub that can be swapped to 15mm from whatever you've already.

    I don't baby my bikes, but am only about 170-175# RTR, so YMMV. Larger mammals may notice more noodliness in the fork than myself.
    Florence Nightingale's Stormtrooper

  49. #249
    Keep on Rockin...
    Reputation: Miker J's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thomasbf View Post
    Hi MTBR

    Here's my first and quite heavy post on the forum - hope you can help me

    I recently bought a used black 2012 Yeti SB-66 alloy with the standard 150mm Fox Float 32 without kashima. So stoked about the bike in general but the fork seems a little flimsy during high speed and rough stuff, and not that sensitive when it comes to small bumps and plushness overall.

    Therefore I'm considering an upgrade to the RS PIKE.

    But I'm in doubt on which model to choose.

    I'm living in flat Denmark and most of my riding is in local forests with a lot of short climbs and descents. My riding style is aggressive cross country moving into all mountain. I like to do drops (currently up to 4 ft) and I'm working on improving my airtime. Occasionally I'll bring the bike to the Alps and serious mountains abroad, but I'll mostly use the bike in more modest topography.

    The obvious choice would be the 150mm solo black version, because it's the "natural" travel length with which my bike was "born". With my current fork I sometimes miss a little extra travel ... whether that's due to the fact that my current fork isn't using all of it's travel or that it's too harsh - I cannot tell. (I'm 88kg in full gear and the fork is set to 75psi, sag is around 30%))

    The second option would be the 160mm solo version also in black. I do not mind a slack geometry on the straights and descents, but I'm concerned that the bike would become too cumbersome while climbing.

    The third option and probably the one I think is the most interesting, is the Dual Position 160mm. Being able to lower the fork 30mm while climbing, sounds very appealing to me, but it has a significant drawback: the fork only comes in white!! which will not match my bike!!

    Do you guys know if the 160mm Dual Position will be available in black in the foreseeable future? And if not; I'll definitely consider doing a custom paint job on a white fork if the dual position turns out to be the right choice for me and my riding style.

    Please forgive me for all my questions but which fork do you guys think I should go for considering my style of riding and aesthetic preferences?

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Find out what the recommended A to C on the fork for the frame. A Fox 150mm may not have the A to C as the Pike. That said, I think they are coming in pretty close to the same A to C.

    I've played around with enough forks and frames to have come to the conclusion that going with what is recommended by the frame designer is best.

    A 150mm fork will still climb OK. A 160mm on a bike made for a 150mm not so much. While Dual Position forks function very well with climbing steeps, I find them more trouble than they are worth. Especially with shorter steeper techy climbs. They are also problematic when I forget to change the travel back to full mode and head back down hill.

    A longer travel fork does not automatically make the bike perform better on downhills. That is a huge misconception.

    The Pike... Amazing fork.

  50. #250
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    Find out what the recommended A to C on the fork for the frame. A Fox 150mm may not have the A to C as the Pike. That said, I think they are coming in pretty close to the same A to C.

    I've played around with enough forks and frames to have come to the conclusion that going with what is recommended by the frame designer is best.

    A 150mm fork will still climb OK. A 160mm on a bike made for a 150mm not so much. While Dual Position forks function very well with climbing steeps, I find them more trouble than they are worth. Especially with shorter steeper techy climbs. They are also problematic when I forget to change the travel back to full mode and head back down hill.

    A longer travel fork does not automatically make the bike perform better on downhills. That is a huge misconception.

    The Pike... Amazing fork.
    Ok, a 150mm fork vs. 160, no, not much difference, in fact, might as well go with the more travel. 10mm isn't going to make much of a difference in climbing, might as well have the extra travel. The pike is also shorter axle-to-crown than the fox 150mm, so one more reason to go with 160.

    In the more general sense:

    Screw the recommended axle to crown, if we're talking about 150 vs 160 and it came with a 150, it's only 10mm. Chances are they didn't design it with the thought that there'll only be that one 150mm fork forever. If we were talking about 20 or more mm different than stock, then yes, we'd need to be more careful and think it through/possibly not do it.

    Yes, you are correct that more travel doesn't always perform better downhill, I've been on enough quality dampers to know, but on the other hand, slightly slacker does handle downhill better, and we're talking about a pike, not a 170mm Jr T or something that would be trying to snap your wrists off.

    How much time do you have with the new dual-position Pike? I'll admit I have zero time with it and that I'm skeptical of air-spring travel adjustments, but that doesn't mean it doesn't work. I used ETA for climbs for something like 6 years and it worked great every time, so it's not automatically bad, depends on how they designed it.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

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