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  1. #1
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    Motiv Ground Pounder - Need to replace rear shock

    I have a Motiv Ground Pounder from Cosco wholesale....put about 1600+ miles on it. Rear shock seems kinda smushy now...bounces way too much, doesn't absorb like it used to. Does anyone have a recommendation for replacement. I have not too much an idea about shocks and what to replace it with or what CAN be put in it's place.

  2. #2
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    Buy Another one

    Repairing a Costco bike is a study in diminishing returns. You simply cannot fix it. It was junk the day it rolled out of the factory, and it was made worse the day it was assembled by someone who is not a professional. Spending money on rear shock for it would be like polishing a turd. I don't say this to be insulting to you, but to make a point about the quality or lack thereof that went into any Costco bike.

    Go to a bike shop, tell them how much you have to spend, tell them where you ride and how, and would they kindly show you the best bike they have/carry for your needs? Be prepared for some harsh reality when you see the prices of bikes whose rear suspension actually performs. I'll repeat this one part because it is the most important: GO TO A BIKE SHOP.

  3. #3
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    I have not a problem with this bike as everything has been upgraded, like any bike, I would be spending more money for a bike with better shocks in the rear, considering that is the only problem WITH that bike, I am keeping it. If someone has something intelligent like specs on what to replace it with, please post. If you feel the need to tell me "it's not worth it" cause you feel angry that I spent 1/4 you did on your bike and got the same if not better parts to work with, then go somewhere else. (Oh and mind you the shocks lasted me 1600+ miles without a problem and they rode just fine till now)

  4. #4
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    He is right as far as the cost of the bike vs. the cost of a new shock.... But if you want to go the replacement route, take the bike to a bike shop so they can measure the shock stroke and eye to eye length and then they can see what is available for your bike...

    Brian

  5. #5
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    MadMike25, Kracker may have been harsh, but there is at least some degree of wisdom to be had from his post. I’ll be honest. At first I thought this might be a troll, but I can tell by the size of the chip on your shoulder in the second post that you’re serious.

    With that said, you need to determine the “eye to eye” measurement of the shock and the “stroke” (how far the shock itself compresses) to determine if it can be replaced. If it’s a common size, you might be able to find something second hand that would not cost you more than the bike cost new (minus all of the upgraded parts, of course). Chances are that it is not likely to be compatible (size, mounting style, available spring rates and frame clearances), but I don’t know for sure.

    Another route to go would be to find a used or cheap new FS frame. You can find ones that should be equal to or better than yours for as little as $300 (a good rear shock can cost that much or more) if you shop hard. Put all of your upgraded parts on that and get back on the trail.

    Hard to know for sure without knowing what exactly the other upgrades are.

    And if you really like the bike that much, it might make more $en$e to buy another new COSTCO bike and transfer your upgraded parts to it.

    IMHO, my choice (if you have indeed upgraded everything else including the fork – otherwise disregard this) would be to upgrade the frame and shock by carefully shopping for a new or good used replacement. An example would be the KHS 504 that jenson was recently selling for $299. If the shock is compatible with something like a Fox, Rock Shok or Manitou (or some others) and you could get it for say around $100, you might end up happy to go that way.

    Just a thought or two: If you have indeed ‘upgraded’ everything else on the bike, then you likely have as much invested as the rest of “us” dummies, so brush that chip off your shoulder. And you didn’t get the same or better parts for Ľ of what others paid. You got a high-end department store style bike (and that ain’t saying much) for less than a department store would have charged for it. I am not the least bit angry that I am not riding your bike no matter if it was given to me for free. You might also be ten times the rider I am and I’m still not angry.

    Here’s the thing with a COSTCO bike. The thing that gets to most experienced cyclists when they see the bikes in COSTCO is the way they are assembled and sold more so than the bike and parts themselves. I have been there many times and seen them for myself. My own brother has worked for COSTCO for over ten years and even spent some time assembling bikes when things got hectic around Xmas time (if you were lucky, you got one that was assembled by him). I know what they offer to pay to have them assembled outside the store. Let’s just say that it’s not much more than a combo from McD’s. You can’t expect to get a bicycle assembled properly for that much money. I have personally never seen one assembled well enough to ride safely right from the store. To be honest, you won’t likely find one in a department store ready to safely ride either. I have even seen bikes in bike stores on the showroom floor that were not ready too, but every bike I have ever bought from a bike store was sent back to the mechanic to be inspected and tuned before being released. The other factor is fit. All of the COSTCO and other department store bikes are basically “medium” sized frames. If you belong on a medium size frame, that’s great, but people unknowingly buy improperly sized bikes every day and miss out on the enjoyment of riding a properly sized bike. Beyond that, it can be painful, injurious and even dangerous to ride a bike that’s improperly sized and/or adjusted. If you know for a fact that a COSTCO bike is the right size for you, you know how to properly set up, adjust & maintain a bicycle and don’t mind riding a bike spec’d with barely entry level or below (for serious MTB duty) parts that is several pounds heavier, weaker and usually less reliable than it could or should be, then you got what you paid for.

    I have loved a bike that my father salvaged from a dumpster that we refurbished and I rode it far and often. I’m in the process of trying to find a similar bike for my daughter to ride at college. I bought a car once for $50 that I drove for a year and even as I added a quart of Ray-Lube every week, I loved it for what it was (cheap transportation at a time when I really needed it). When that old car finally croaked, I left it next to some railroad tracks and walked away laughing and cackling. I have had several other old beaters that were not much better, but I never kidded myself about their intended use and most importantly, their limitations. For your own safety, I hope you don't either.

    The bottom line is that if you like your bike, get over it, get it fixed and let’s go riding.

  6. #6
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    Too bad I know how to check over a bike and re-assemble it myself...correctly.

  7. #7
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    Cheap bikes

    Quote Originally Posted by MadMike25
    Too bad I know how to check over a bike and re-assemble it myself...correctly.

    it can be hard to get advice on cheap bikes here sometimes, but dont let the flaming get to you. Some good advice has been given here though. You need to get the shock measured. that is the first step. after that you can look at the possibilities to replace it. my last bike was from cosco. i loved it for about 2 years. it then seemed a lot of parts needed to be replaced. it was not worth it to me, so i bought a new bike. if the rear shock is your only problem, look into replacing it.

    Not everyone needs a $1500 bike to be happy.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by MadMike25
    Too bad I know how to check over a bike and re-assemble it myself...correctly.
    “Too bad” for who? Me? Your bike, your ability to spot an excellent deal on a “mountain bike”, your ability to re-assemble it correctly and then replace all of it’s parts has absolutely nothing to do with me.

    The world is full of people that are “misunderstood” by certain segments of the population. In this forum, you are one of those people. It doesn’t make you right or wrong, just different. In this forum, you are like the guy that goes to the speed shop because he wants to hop up his 74 Gremlin and wants to know who makes a four-barrel intake manifold and headers for it. All the guys with Mustangs and Camaros are scratching their heads wondering why. It’s OK, however the sooner you accept that you are going to be misunderstood in this forum, the sooner you can move on and be more effective at getting what you need from here.

    If that floats your boat, fine. However, your “too bad” comment leads me to believe that you still want to get into how great a deal your bike was/is. If so, then tell us how much you paid for it new, when you bought it, if it fits you correctly (which is entirely possible), what parts you have upgraded to and how much each of those parts cost and we can discuss whether or not it is such a great deal. Then we can also discuss whether it’s wise to sink even more money into it.

    Otherwise, if you have decided that you want to replace the rear shock whether or not it makes sense to others and you’d still like some assistance replacing the shock, measure the eye to eye and stroke and let’s move on. If you could post a picture of it that clearly shows how it mounts, that could be helpful too.

  9. #9
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    Good thing I learned my lesson early...

    If you're willing to drop $300 on a new shock just save a few more nuggets and replace it with a Weyless SP frameset from SuperGo ... not your BIG BRAND, HIGH $$$ bike but a worthy Single Pivot design for a fraction of the cost, $499. I'm not a big fan personally but I must admit a good deal when I see one. You can upgrade this rig all you want and I'm sure the frame will withstand whatever you throw at it. Did I mention for $50 more it includes the $350.00 5th Element Air shock and the frame is a similar design to the Santa Cruz Heckler? MOVE ON AMIGO! Spend your money wisely.

    Here's a link: http://www.supergo.com/profile.cfm?L...04&referpage=#

  10. #10
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    Not sure i'd want to hear I needed a new frame when the question was a shock recomendation. Sure a new frame bike would be a positive choice but there could be money issues etc. Maybe he really likes his Costco ride ??? As stated shock eye to eye is crucial - a used Fox Vanilla R can be had for less than a $100, usually less (E-Bay, MTBR, Ridemonkey etc.)

  11. #11
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    Wow...

    Quote Originally Posted by MadMike25
    Too bad I know how to check over a bike and re-assemble it myself...correctly.

    MadMike, you really come across as a true idiot. You have a bunch of helpful people here who are offering you sound advice, yet you get defensive at every suggestion. These people KNOW what they are talking about...there is a reason they spend much of their free time on a bicycle forum, you know.

    So, instead of acting foolishly, do what you intended to do in the first place when you posted: LISTEN.

  12. #12
    Are you talking to me?
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    Good points.

    Quote Originally Posted by jstine912
    MadMike, you really come across as a true idiot. You have a bunch of helpful people here who are offering you sound advice, yet you get defensive at every suggestion. These people KNOW what they are talking about...there is a reason they spend much of their free time on a bicycle forum, you know.

    So, instead of acting foolishly, do what you intended to do in the first place when you posted: LISTEN.
    I was going to chime in early on, but MadMike had already gone on the defense mode. This fourm is made up uf people who are trying to share a passion, and most have been through a similar situation. (or know someone who has)

    MadMike, if you really want to upgrade the shock, you need to measure the eye to eye and the stroke, but also the width (in millimeters) of the mounting hardware. Understand that there is a good chance that the mounting system is not compatable with the current upper-end shock technology. Good luck.
    gfy

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